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Thread: Scanning of Negatives?

  1. #1
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    Default Scanning of Negatives?

    Hi Fellow Snipers,

    Goodday I started with digital cam so no idea on the purpose of scanning negatives. I can understand scanning the developed film and slides but negatives??? For what purpose? Anyone can shred some light?

    Thanks and warmest regards.

  2. #2

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    (1) Archival purposes.
    (2) Usually cheaper.

    And after shedding some light, what are you going to do about it?

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    Quote Originally Posted by CAMEDIA
    Hi Fellow Snipers,

    Goodday I started with digital cam so no idea on the purpose of scanning negatives. I can understand scanning the developed film and slides but negatives??? For what purpose? Anyone can shred some light?

    Thanks and warmest regards.
    For the same reason as scanning slides -- to get that frame into your PC to do touchup, printing, emailing, websites, archival, etc.

    Regards
    CK

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    Now got some light but still cloudy. Archival tt I can understand but email/touchup/etc....negatives to be have no color, doesn't touchup, etc should be done on a scanned developed photo.

    Maybe its due to my concept that negative bo color one. Can shred some more light, a little more....plzzzz

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by CAMEDIA
    Maybe its due to my concept that negative bo color one. Can shred some more light, a little more....plzzzz
    Erm, scanned negatives HAVE colour.
    Don't really know how the actual mechanism works, but scanned negatives have colour for sure. Basically the colours are inverse of those "exposed" on the negatives, minus the orange cast. The scanning software will do the colour reversal automatically.

    Of course, unless you are talking about B/W negatives.

  6. #6
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    The scanner software will automatically convert the orangy negatives back to the regular colours you see on a photo. From there you can do whatever you want to it just like any digital image. Even for B&W negatives ("colourless") there is still hell lot of things you can do with it as a digital file (including adding colour to it.... )


    Regards
    CK

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    Quote Originally Posted by ckiang
    The scanner software will automatically convert the orangy negatives back to the regular colours you see on a photo. From there you can do whatever you want to it just like any digital image. Even for B&W negatives ("colourless") there is still hell lot of things you can do with it as a digital file (including adding colour to it.... )


    Regards
    CK
    Ahhh...now I understand liow...got color one ...Thanks for sharing the info. So normally for film shooters, do they still develop all photos (which I used to do with P&S but find costly leh) in a roll or juz scan in the negatives then decide to develop which one later? The main reason I see why I am doing digital is for the instant review and lower running cost, ie no need to buy film and develop them.

    This is interesting, maybe I explore a bit into film.

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by CAMEDIA
    Ahhh...now I understand liow...got color one ...Thanks for sharing the info. So normally for film shooters, do they still develop all photos (which I used to do with P&S but find costly leh) in a roll or juz scan in the negatives then decide to develop which one later? The main reason I see why I am doing digital is for the instant review and lower running cost, ie no need to buy film and develop them.

    This is interesting, maybe I explore a bit into film.
    You should explore film, especially slides. It's a test of your skills. A lot of my friends do not hesitate to trash megabytes of pictures on a digicam, yet when I pass them my SLR, simply refuse to take a single shot.

    My money-saving strategy is to scan the roll, and then select the shots I want and blow it up. It's overall cheaper that way. Nevertheless, I must say that the running costs of film is eventually more expensive compared to digital--but then again, digicams depreciate like crazy...

    I yearn for instant review, but I realise I can live without it most of the time.

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by CAMEDIA
    Ahhh...now I understand liow...got color one ...Thanks for sharing the info. So normally for film shooters, do they still develop all photos (which I used to do with P&S but find costly leh) in a roll or juz scan in the negatives then decide to develop which one later? The main reason I see why I am doing digital is for the instant review and lower running cost, ie no need to buy film and develop them.

    This is interesting, maybe I explore a bit into film.
    My reason of doing film despite the cost is that I'm dying to get into SLR but no money to get DSLR, hence a film SLR

    I have a digicam for events that can simply shoot for fun like birthday, BBQ, or even to check for exposure or composition before I commit my film on a shot

    A good side effect is that it makes me think more about how the picture will come out before I shoot with film. Any good picture will have double happines effect while bad pictures will have double pain (the bad picture and the cost of making that bad picture ) So in the end, lesson learnt from film camera sticks better

    And of course, to save cost, I don't print oll of my negatives, normally I just send the rolls to develop and scan, no printing.

    Well, the above mentioned things are just for me, not sure about what other film shooters do with their negatives

    Hope that helps

    Cheers

  10. #10
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    One advantage I find...

    can use film like xtra 800 or 1600 on my compact Point and Shoot.
    I like small size camera and low light photography.

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    Quote Originally Posted by CAMEDIA
    Ahhh...now I understand liow...got color one ...Thanks for sharing the info. So normally for film shooters, do they still develop all photos (which I used to do with P&S but find costly leh) in a roll or juz scan in the negatives then decide to develop which one later? The main reason I see why I am doing digital is for the instant review and lower running cost, ie no need to buy film and develop them.

    This is interesting, maybe I explore a bit into film.
    You can do either. Some people still prefer a physical print. Look at it as an option you can exercise. You can either 1) Print all or 2) Develop and scan and then see which ones you want to print.

    Lower running costs? Guess it depends on which DSLR you buy...

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