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Thread: Need pointers for wedding shots!

  1. #1

    Default Need pointers for wedding shots!

    HI, I am thinking of helping my friend in his coming wedding . (Not as an official photog.)

    I would appreciate if you guys/gals can advice me some pointers ( if with photo sample , even better)
    I'm curious to know what would be the best mode ( manual or Aperture priority?) ?
    Should I bring along a flash, I am not used to flash photography yet.

    What would be the appropriate Aperture for wedding candid shots?

    Dont feel like bringing along my tripod, is it ok?

    Thank You!
    Last edited by Hosea; 17th May 2004 at 10:45 PM.

  2. #2
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    Hi,

    try doing a search on 'wedding' or 'ROM' in clubsnap. I think you can get some answers to your questions.

  3. #3

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    The best mode would be 'P' mode cos u don't have to worry about anything! Just let the camera decide. To me, a good wedding photo is one that captured the moment. Don't think so much of whether the DOP is sufficient or whether the bride's hair is messy or not, by the time u are ready, the cow would have reached home!!! :P

    Flash is a MUST since u are shooting indoor (i presumed).

    Tripod is NOT required cos no one is going to wait for you to set up!!

    f/5.6 should be quite sufficient to take candid shots.. but i believed you should be more concern abt the shuttter speed instead cos candid means not prepared, everything might be gone in sec.. shutter 1/90 and above recommended

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by chelsea

    Flash is a MUST since u are shooting indoor (i presumed).
    Flash can also be use in outdoor too when the backlight is strong.

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by Snowcrash
    Hi,

    try doing a search on 'wedding' or 'ROM' in clubsnap. I think you can get some answers to your questions.
    Thanks , did try to search and see some photo there.

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by chelsea
    The best mode would be 'P' mode cos u don't have to worry about anything! Just let the camera decide. To me, a good wedding photo is one that captured the moment. Don't think so much of whether the DOP is sufficient or whether the bride's hair is messy or not, by the time u are ready, the cow would have reached home!!! :P

    Flash is a MUST since u are shooting indoor (i presumed).

    Tripod is NOT required cos no one is going to wait for you to set up!!

    f/5.6 should be quite sufficient to take candid shots.. but i believed you should be more concern abt the shuttter speed instead cos candid means not prepared, everything might be gone in sec.. shutter 1/90 and above recommended
    Thanks Chelsea,
    Hmm, using flash. I have to borrow a flash and it is not meant for digital a very old flash. So setting quite incovenience.
    Btw, think should raise the flash as certain angle to prevent harsh flash on the face ,right?

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by skyline_impreza
    Flash can also be use in outdoor too when the backlight is strong.
    That's true also.

  8. #8

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    it's true that flash can also be used as fill in light during outdoor..

    if the flash is really an old flash that needs a lot of setting, it's better that you learn and try it out before the actual day.

    you might need a bounce card if u want to lift the flash to a certain angle. the ceiling might be able to do that, provided it's not too high.. hdb flat ceiling is ok, but not those ballroom..

  9. #9

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    bring lots of film , battery, memory card. sleep early, reach early and think more before pressing the shutter...

    remeber to eat first too.... a hungry photographer cannot perform ....

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hosea
    Thanks Chelsea,
    Hmm, using flash. I have to borrow a flash and it is not meant for digital a very old flash. So setting quite incovenience.
    Btw, think should raise the flash as certain angle to prevent harsh flash on the face ,right?
    Get a good flash if possible. You should be using a bounce card whenever the ceiling is not too high. Take note that flash recycling time will increase (and consequently, shot to shot time) if you're using a bounce card.

  11. #11

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    If I were u, I will rather not use a bounce card if the ceiling is high. It is pointless, shadows will still be casted and the photo will still look flat.

  12. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by imaginary_number
    Get a good flash if possible. You should be using a bounce card whenever the ceiling is not too high. Take note that flash recycling time will increase (and consequently, shot to shot time) if you're using a bounce card.
    thanks for all the good advices!
    Street, thanks .. ya must eat something before I go.
    Imaginary & Niviek,
    Actually I thought of keeping myself at low profile without flash and bound card., dont want to stress the assigned Photog.
    Look like a flash might helps a lot for the indoor. Think I have to use the Auto mode of the flash and key manually after reading my cam's setting.

    I am more worry on the portion when they serve tea and giving of Angpow.
    Space can be limited and I might not have a good position.

    Would it be a good idea to use zoom lens( 200mm) , as I realized I hv stand really far if I use zoom lens. I might be block by others.

    How about when outside the house, along the car park and also near the house. Should i use auto as mentioned . Will auto also create a good portrait like the Aperture priority?

  13. #13

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    Hosea: Flash is a MUST for indoors. For lens during indoors, I will use a 28-70 or equivalent. It will be enough for all needs if you dun have other lens.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hosea
    Thanks Chelsea,
    Hmm, using flash. I have to borrow a flash and it is not meant for digital a very old flash. So setting quite incovenience.
    Btw, think should raise the flash as certain angle to prevent harsh flash on the face ,right?
    Suggestions:-

    Indoors use flash. Since flash does not have TTL, suggest you go manual. Depending on the auto mode of the flash you borrow. Go for f8 or f5.6, shutter speed /125 or 1/250. Set your flash auto to same f number as camera. Bounce if ceiling is not high, make sure you judge you distance to subject and estimate the bounce. Don't forget to set flash iso to the same as your camera, guess you'll be on iso200. Also check if lights are switched on in the room and set your WB accordingly to the lights.

    Outdoors use flash also if sun is bright and behind subjects. Go on P mode and check the camera's aperture selection and match your flash auto mode to that same as camera's selection. For front lit shots you should be able to get good exposures without the flash.

    The kit lens is suitable for both indoors and outdoors.

    Perhaps you may also like to try using some filters like soft diffuser, soft spot for the bride's portraits. I have some such 55mm filters, let me know if you need, you can borrow them.

    Perhaps some experts can give comments on the above suggestions.
    Last edited by nokin; 18th May 2004 at 03:10 PM.

  15. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by nokin
    Perhaps you may also like to try using some filters like soft diffuser, soft spot for the bride's portraits. I have some such 55mm filters, let me know if you need, you can borrow them.
    Diffusers will reduce the amount of light and might degrade the picture quality. IMO, for film, you can overexpose the shot by maybe 1 stop and ask the lab to do some soft effect. The results is fantastic. For digital, using soft filters is a waste of money IMO. Photoshop is our best friend.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hosea
    thanks for all the good advices!
    I am more worry on the portion when they serve tea and giving of Angpow.
    Space can be limited and I might not have a good position.
    You are not the main photographer, rite? This "standard" shot should be left to the main photographer. Ya, try not to stand in his way or just oppose him where you can be seen.



    Quote Originally Posted by Hosea
    Would it be a good idea to use zoom lens( 200mm) , as I realized I hv stand really far if I use zoom lens. I might be block by others.
    I will recomend a good tele zoom for candid shot. You won't block the main photographer and can snap w/o people noticing you. However, do be mindful of camera shake at long focal length.

    If the couple is receptive to B&W, using them might be give them something different that the main photographer can't.

    Good luck.

  17. #17
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    try not to duplicate the main photographer shots..
    shoot something else instead..

  18. #18
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    Actually, during wedding shoots, I prefer wides over zooms, do be careful of distortions.

    Just go and enjoy shooting, don't have to worry about settings & workflow that the main has to, unless you're the main of course...

  19. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by nokin
    Suggestions:-

    Indoors use flash. Since flash does not have TTL, suggest you go manual. Depending on the auto mode of the flash you borrow. Go for f8 or f5.6, shutter speed /125 or 1/250. Set your flash auto to same f number as camera. Bounce if ceiling is not high, make sure you judge you distance to subject and estimate the bounce. Don't forget to set flash iso to the same as your camera, guess you'll be on iso200. Also check if lights are switched on in the room and set your WB accordingly to the lights.

    Outdoors use flash also if sun is bright and behind subjects. Go on P mode and check the camera's aperture selection and match your flash auto mode to that same as camera's selection. For front lit shots you should be able to get good exposures without the flash.

    The kit lens is suitable for both indoors and outdoors.

    Perhaps you may also like to try using some filters like soft diffuser, soft spot for the bride's portraits. I have some such 55mm filters, let me know if you need, you can borrow them.

    Perhaps some experts can give comments on the above suggestions.
    Thanks Nokin, this are great advices...ya, if I need the diffuser I will call you. Hope to have time to play with the old flash b4 wedding.
    Last edited by Hosea; 18th May 2004 at 07:18 PM.

  20. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by NiVleK
    Diffusers will reduce the amount of light and might degrade the picture quality. IMO, for film, you can overexpose the shot by maybe 1 stop and ask the lab to do some soft effect. The results is fantastic. For digital, using soft filters is a waste of money IMO. Photoshop is our best friend.
    Hmm, I don't know PS

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