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Thread: Nd Grad

  1. #1

    Default Nd Grad

    Just wanted to find out what brands of ND Grad Filters (X8 screw in 52mm ) are good and roughly how much do they cost?

    Any ideas?

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by bigfatfish
    Just wanted to find out what brands of ND Grad Filters (X8 screw in 52mm ) are good and roughly how much do they cost?

    Any ideas?
    screw in grads aren't very useful unless you want the line of transition smack in the middle of the frame all the time. you might want to consider the slot in type filter holders (eg cokin p).. it allows you more control.

  3. #3

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    Heard that Singh-Ray ND filters are good but don't seem to be selling in Singapore.
    I brought a Cokin ND4 GD for $27 at CP. But you first has to purchase a filterholder $10 and a Adaptor ring that can screw on to your lens, price depend on size.

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by justarius
    screw in grads aren't very useful unless you want the line of transition smack in the middle of the frame all the time. you might want to consider the slot in type filter holders (eg cokin p).. it allows you more control.

    erm... dont mind can you explain about the line of transition? So what are the advantages of a slot holding ND grad filter?

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    Hope you dun mind I borrow your thread as I have some questions too. Does the filter holder and adapter come in different size(eg. 58mm, 62mm, etc)?

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    Quote Originally Posted by bigfatfish
    erm... dont mind can you explain about the line of transition? So what are the advantages of a slot holding ND grad filter?
    nd grad filters, as it name suggest, is graduated, ie one side is dark and the other clear. the place where the two meet is the line of transition. this line can be hard (clear distinct transition) or soft (no clear line, the filter gradually darkens over a range). When you use a nd grad, you are trying to control the contrast. unless you compose with your line of contrast smack in the centre of the frame all the time, a screw in nd grad filter isn't very usefull at all as the line of transition is normally in the middle of the filter. Slot in filters on the other hand, allows you to position that line where ever you like, and you can compose better.

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by justarius
    nd grad filters, as it name suggest, is graduated, ie one side is dark and the other clear. the place where the two meet is the line of transition. this line can be hard (clear distinct transition) or soft (no clear line, the filter gradually darkens over a range). When you use a nd grad, you are trying to control the contrast. unless you compose with your line of contrast smack in the centre of the frame all the time, a screw in nd grad filter isn't very usefull at all as the line of transition is normally in the middle of the filter. Slot in filters on the other hand, allows you to position that line where ever you like, and you can compose better.
    Ah...i understand now. ok...Well, i have read that ND Grad 8X is the most useful? is that true?

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by bigfatfish
    Ah...i understand now. ok...Well, i have read that ND Grad 8X is the most useful? is that true?
    Nope!
    It really depends on the situation you are shooting.
    Example: Shooting landscape, involving sky. Your meter say that foreground is 2 stop darker than sky. So you need 1 or 2 stop ND grad (which translate to ND4 or ND8)

  9. #9

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    meaning if the contrast is really great like a FIERY SUNRISE, then I need an 8x ?

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by bigfatfish
    meaning if the contrast is really great like a FIERY SUNRISE, then I need an 8x ?
    if the difference in stop is really great, you might even need more than that.
    So you might have to couple ND8 with ND4

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