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Thread: Is knowledge of exposure still relevant?

  1. #21

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    actually, i do not preach AE or AEB.
    Just that I observed that there aren't many photogs (less than 20%?) using incident lightmeter or grey card for general purpose photo taking.
    I.e. determine the light intensity the scientific way.
    It is quite a hassle, i admit. Slow even I'll say.
    But some will think it is therapeutic.
    Actually, street wisdom has it that one can meter your palm and open one stop.

    Ok I did see one young guy using a lightmeter (gossen i think) last saturday.
    He and his friend are photographing a lamp post outside Peninsular
    plaza... yeah, he is using Hassy 501(?).

    I did observe wedding photogs using lightmeter while shooting outside Fullerton.
    Actually their assistants are doing the reading.....

    Mmmmm, a non-scientific conclusion will be that incident light metering
    is usually practised by medium format guys more than 35mm. what say u...
    ---------------------
    Secondly, candlelit photos are real challenging.....
    Try it without flash and usually high speed B&W film delivers a more consistent quality......

  2. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by jpcc
    actually, i do not preach AE or AEB.
    Just that I observed that there aren't many photogs (less than 20%?) using incident lightmeter or grey card for general purpose photo taking.
    I.e. determine the light intensity the scientific way.
    It is quite a hassle, i admit. Slow even I'll say.
    But some will think it is therapeutic.
    Actually, street wisdom has it that one can meter your palm and open one stop.

    Ok I did see one young guy using a lightmeter (gossen i think) last saturday.
    He and his friend are photographing a lamp post outside Peninsular
    plaza... yeah, he is using Hassy 501(?).

    I did observe wedding photogs using lightmeter while shooting outside Fullerton.
    Actually their assistants are doing the reading.....

    Mmmmm, a non-scientific conclusion will be that incident light metering
    is usually practised by medium format guys more than 35mm. what say u...
    ---------------------
    Secondly, candlelit photos are real challenging.....
    Try it without flash and usually high speed B&W film delivers a more consistent quality......
    They use light meters for the wedding shoots to make themselves look more professional. Anyway, I think incident is the way to go.

  3. #23
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jpcc
    actually, i do not preach AE or AEB.
    Just that I observed that there aren't many photogs (less than 20%?) using incident lightmeter or grey card for general purpose photo taking.
    I.e. determine the light intensity the scientific way.
    It is quite a hassle, i admit. Slow even I'll say.
    But some will think it is therapeutic.
    Actually, street wisdom has it that one can meter your palm and open one stop.

    Ok I did see one young guy using a lightmeter (gossen i think) last saturday.
    He and his friend are photographing a lamp post outside Peninsular
    plaza... yeah, he is using Hassy 501(?).

    I did observe wedding photogs using lightmeter while shooting outside Fullerton.
    Actually their assistants are doing the reading.....

    Mmmmm, a non-scientific conclusion will be that incident light metering
    is usually practised by medium format guys more than 35mm. what say u...
    ---------------------
    Secondly, candlelit photos are real challenging.....
    Try it without flash and usually high speed B&W film delivers a more consistent quality......
    Reflective light metering in the camera system is good enough for most people. Those who use incident light meters are mostly studio/portrait photographers or MF/LF shooters (not all MF cameras have meters)

  4. #24
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    Jun 2003
    Location
    Singapore, Bedok
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    1,785

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    Quote Originally Posted by jpcc
    Just that I observed that there aren't many photogs (less than 20%?) using incident lightmeter or grey card for general purpose photo taking.
    I.e. determine the light intensity the scientific way.
    It is quite a hassle, i admit. Slow even I'll say.

    Secondly, candlelit photos are real challenging.....
    Try it without flash and usually high speed B&W film delivers a more consistent quality......
    A decent light meter is a few hundred dollars, and takes up the space of about 1 lens in the bag. i would pick one up if someone could seriously convince me of the relevance, practicality and accuracy of a incident light meter, over doing a spot-reading on a grey card. (Which costs and weighs less.)

    i would argue that any photographer experienced enough to correctly use an incident meter (ie where to place it and which direction to point it) will get by perfectly with a grey card and spot meter.

    Ok, i'll confess that i belong to the 'lazy' class of photogs who use evaluative (ie auto) metering most of the time, except the situations that demand user-intervention. Maybe those who are more rigorous in their metering can share on the advantages of using an incident meter.

  5. #25
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    Singapore, Redhill
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    Knowledge of exposure is STILL important. Two side effects exposure in our imperfect world is the Depth of Field and the Motion Blur. For sharpness, small aperture, but more motion blur. For freezing motion, higher shutter speed but larger aperture hence lack of dof. Point and shoot will not help in this, even with 3d colour matrix metering. Yes, you get a well exposed image, but what about the two side effects? As software and hardware improve, matrix metering accuracy and speed will improve, but we are still limited by the imperfect lenses. This is applicable both to digital and film.

  6. #26

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    Hi yowch,
    interesting observation on DOF.

    Two things:
    1) P&S or AE does not determine the aperture.
    It determines the exposure value.
    Normally, it will select the most suitable shutter speed, and dial in the
    aperture accordingly.
    If EV too low, use flash.
    Otherwise, use biggest aperture, and slower shutter spd accordingly.

    However, if P&S in Aper Priority mode, aperture will be determined by the user.
    But the EV calculation is still done by machine....

    2) When u go digital, methinks most likely the DOF is sacrificed due
    to the smaller sensor size.
    I haven't seen raw image from full frame sensor (e.g. Canon 1D).

    Is the DOF output for full frame sensor the same as conventional 35mm?
    Let's say using 90mm/f2.8/1m subj focus distance...


    (I understand medium format has a shallower DOF. LF is even shallower?)

  7. #27
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    Which is why exposure understanding is important. f4.0 1/125 is the same as f5.6 1/250, but to know which to choose is part of photography. If it is a truly idiot-proof camera, then I am pretty sure that it will be shutter priority from 1/xxx until 1/60, then it'll be fixed at full aperture with flash warning blinking. Actually, in some really cheap P&S cameras, there is only 1 aperture setting, often f4.0.

    Back to the question of "Is knowledge of exposure still relevant?", I still beleive that it is necessary.

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