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Thread: Any tips on how to take fine shots in hot afternoon?

  1. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by ziploc
    This is called the "Sunny 16" rule. The rule says that in a sunny day with direct sunlight (no overcast) around mid day, the shutter speed is 1/ISO if you set your aperture to f/16. So for example if the ISO you are using is 100, then you set your camera to f/16, 1/125s (the closest to 1/100).

    For Sukoo's A70 where f/16 is not available, you can use the equivalent: f/16 at 1/125s is equivalent to f/8 at 1/250s.

    For model shoot, overcast day is better then sunny day as mentioned, as softer light is more desirable. Metering technique is to use spot meter to meter the model's face, and if your model is chinese, no much compensation is needed as the skin tone will be close to grey. Remember to use AE lock if you are in aperture priority mode.

    Hope that helps.
    Hi ziploc, what if i set iso 100, speed as 1/125 and aperture f16 shown me that my shot is gonna be under or over? do i have to compensate say f8 if
    under and f32 if it is over?

    Thanks in advance!

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by sumball
    Hi ziploc, what if i set iso 100, speed as 1/125 and aperture f16 shown me that my shot is gonna be under or over? do i have to compensate say f8 if
    under and f32 if it is over?

    Thanks in advance!

    Can use flash to compensate.....

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by sumball
    Hi ziploc, what if i set iso 100, speed as 1/125 and aperture f16 shown me that my shot is gonna be under or over? do i have to compensate say f8 if
    under and f32 if it is over?

    Thanks in advance!
    Hi sumball,

    Sorry I missed your post earlier. Anyway, you shouldn't be getting under or over when you are using f/16, 1/125s (for iso100) and shooting in the "Sunny16" condition: i.e. sunny day, noon sun, no clouds in the sky, direct sunlight. You'll need to compensate when it is partially cloudy, overcast, or your subject is under the shade.

    The following guidelines are from the packaging of Fuji Superia 100 (they used f/11 1/250s for sunny16, which is equivalent to f/16 1/125s):

    Bright sunlight (sunny16 condition): f/11, 1/250s
    Hazy sunlight: f/8, 1/250s
    Cloudy bright: f/5.6, 1/250s
    Cloudy day or open shade: f/4, 1/250s

    You can actually use the sunny16 rule to check the accuracy of your spot/partial/center weighted meters: just measure a grey card under sunny16 condition. You should get f/16, 1/125s or it's equivalent (e.g. f/11, 1/250s or f/8, 1/500s, etc). Take note that you'll need to cover the entire frame when you're using center weighted metering.

    Hope that helps.
    Last edited by ziploc; 13th June 2004 at 10:43 AM.

  4. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by StealthEagle
    I was thinking about taking part in the shooting competition about the making of the grand opening in the school. I know most people will start their rehearsals in the afternoon, maybe about 3pm or so. I'm a user of the Powershot A70 (no $$$ to own SLR ) .

    I know it is not the best idea to take any photos in the hot afternoon where overexpose pics are common. But can any pros give some tips on shooting in such bright conditions?
    On a bright sunny day, the tendency is for your subject to be underexposed, not over.. you will need fill-in flash to light up the subject.

    On the A70, force flash, instead of 'automatic' and make sure you are not too far away... about 3m-5m away as the flash isn't that powerful. Check on the screen to make sure that the face is sufficiently illuminated, else move closer to subject.

  5. #25

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    In contrary to many here, I tend to shoot on overcast or cloudy days. A sunny day will not guarantee perfect shots, in fact..... I feel its harder to shoot on sunny days. The contrast between shadows and highlights can be so great, the camera will have to choose which to expose for, resulting in a lost of detail in either areas.

    However, good sunlight can result in vibrant colours, which is good for landscapes, poor for areas where detail is vital. Many have advised to use fill flash using your A70, and I rest assure that you on board flash will hardly be powerful enough to have much of an effect.

    I suggest, use evaluative metering if u do not know how to use partial. Try to shoot indoors where the lighting is more dispersed. Use fill flash indoors if it involves people (watch for possible shadowing). Since its a school opening, look out for opportunities that involve people's expression, yet having a nice part of the school in the background. Of course, you should include a couple of attractive shots of the school .... especially minute details.

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by marcwang
    In contrary to many here, I tend to shoot on overcast or cloudy days. A sunny day will not guarantee perfect shots, in fact..... I feel its harder to shoot on sunny days. The contrast between shadows and highlights can be so great, the camera will have to choose which to expose for, resulting in a lost of detail in either areas.

    However, good sunlight can result in vibrant colours, which is good for landscapes, poor for areas where detail is vital. Many have advised to use fill flash using your A70, and I rest assure that you on board flash will hardly be powerful enough to have much of an effect.
    I wholeheartedly agree... I always get underexposed to slightly underexposed subjects when shooting with bright background, especially when u want to capture in the background as much as is possible.... this occurs using evaluative or centre-weighted metering and given the flash I use 5600HS (top of the line from Minolta - GN55), I still can't get the flash to light up the subject enough even at around 3 metres away and within the flash range. Shutter speeds in such situations often top 1/1000 sec or faster.

    Perhaps the best way in such high contrast situation is to do a spot meter on the subject's face.... although this way the background will be washed out..... I always forget about this when I shoot people under sunny conditions.... haiz....

    So shooting under direct sun on a hot day is a lot harder than an overcast sky although a completely white sky (as is often the case in S'pore) is equally bad....

  7. #27

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    Thanks ziploc for the advise. Will try again....

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