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Thread: Any tips on how to take fine shots in hot afternoon?

  1. #1
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    Default Any tips on how to take fine shots in hot afternoon?

    I was thinking about taking part in the shooting competition about the making of the grand opening in the school. I know most people will start their rehearsals in the afternoon, maybe about 3pm or so. I'm a user of the Powershot A70 (no $$$ to own SLR ) .

    I know it is not the best idea to take any photos in the hot afternoon where overexpose pics are common. But can any pros give some tips on shooting in such bright conditions?

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    Senior Member The_Cheat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by StealthEagle
    I was thinking about taking part in the shooting competition about the making of the grand opening in the school. I know most people will start their rehearsals in the afternoon, maybe about 3pm or so. I'm a user of the Powershot A70 (no $$$ to own SLR ) .

    I know it is not the best idea to take any photos in the hot afternoon where overexpose pics are common. But can any pros give some tips on shooting in such bright conditions?
    Hmm... don't know how true it is that overexpose is a problem. Anyway, I love shooting on a bright sunny day, since I can put my shutter speed way low, and most shots would turn out quite nice. However, just be mindful of any reflection that might affect the picture, giving a wrong metering. And always put on a lens hood so that no flares would affect the picture.

  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by The_Cheat
    Hmm... don't know how true it is that overexpose is a problem. Anyway, I love shooting on a bright sunny day, since I can put my shutter speed way low, and most shots would turn out quite nice. However, just be mindful of any reflection that might affect the picture, giving a wrong metering. And always put on a lens hood so that no flares would affect the picture.
    U mean set the shutter fast?

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    I know it is good to take pics in daylight as you don't have to worry about cam shakes and such, but sometimes if you try to take the picture of the beutiful sky and the object, most of the time you might get the correct exposure of the sky but not the object....

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    U can also try using the following setting:

    1) Set aperture to f16
    2) Set ur shutter speed to the same as ur ISO setting

    On hot afternoon this setting can give u 99% perfect pictures... well that works for me... use a lens hood also to prevent flare...
    The equipment can only bring you so far - the rest of the photographic journey is done by you.

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    i love sunny days!

    Worry about your subject first, no point having a beautiful sky but subject under/over.

  7. #7

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    concentrate on more close-up shots

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by nickmak
    U can also try using the following setting:

    1) Set aperture to f16
    2) Set ur shutter speed to the same as ur ISO setting

    On hot afternoon this setting can give u 99% perfect pictures... well that works for me... use a lens hood also to prevent flare...
    Could I know what is the shutter speed which is same as ISO setting ...

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by nickmak
    U can also try using the following setting:

    1) Set aperture to f16
    2) Set ur shutter speed to the same as ur ISO setting

    On hot afternoon this setting can give u 99% perfect pictures... well that works for me... use a lens hood also to prevent flare...
    1) Not every camera can reach f16... at least not the A70.. so what can be done?

    2) U mean if using ISO 100 then the shutter = 1/100 sec ?

    Thanks

  10. #10

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    I agree with setting the apperture to f16 on sunny days. The pictures turn out fine for me. Using the hood is a must to avoid flare.

    Use Fill-Flash when taking close-in portrait pictures so as to cast out all shadows on subject's faces caused by the sun. Pictures will be better with flashes

  11. #11

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    For me, when i set to Apperture Priority Mode, i set to f16 and snap the pictures without worrying abt the speed. This works for me. My NIKON F80 is very reliable. =)

  12. #12

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    If your A70 cannt go down to f16, is it possible to use a Neutral Density Filter to help bring down the light entering the camera by 1 to 2 stops? Sorry, i am not well versed with the A70, hence not very sure whether any filters can be attached or not.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sukoo
    1) Not every camera can reach f16... at least not the A70.. so what can be done?

    2) U mean if using ISO 100 then the shutter = 1/100 sec ?

    Thanks
    yup that's correct...
    The equipment can only bring you so far - the rest of the photographic journey is done by you.

  14. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by nickmak
    U can also try using the following setting:

    1) Set aperture to f16
    2) Set ur shutter speed to the same as ur ISO setting

    On hot afternoon this setting can give u 99% perfect pictures... well that works for me... use a lens hood also to prevent flare...

    Hi nickmak,

    wat if i am taking portraiture photos for a model? should i close up the aperture or open it up in order to isolate my modelf and the background?

    I find although the shots were taken in the morning say 8+ or 9, the sunlight is pretty bright though.

    Hope you or somebody else can help me here.

    Thanks!

  15. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by mmk
    Hi nickmak,

    wat if i am taking portraiture photos for a model? should i close up the aperture or open it up in order to isolate my modelf and the background?

    I find although the shots were taken in the morning say 8+ or 9, the sunlight is pretty bright though.

    Hope you or somebody else can help me here.

    Thanks!
    The best time to shoot potrait is during cloudy day. Try not to do it in the direct sun, you will be disappointed.

    To isolate the subject from the background, open your apperture bigger (means smaller F nos.).

    You need to familiarise with apperture and shuttle speed thingy.. these are basic.

  16. #16

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    Hi Jim,

    Thanks for your advise. However, find it is somehow the weather uncontrollable. What if we all get ready in the morning to shoot portrait and the dun comes out big big? Is there any solution to it?

    I know if I am to open up the aperture, the background will be blurred and isolate my model with the background. On the other hand, by doing so,... will this step fools the metering system in my camera?

    Or I should use spot metering instead of evaluative or partial val?

    really confuse...

    Thanks!

  17. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by mmk
    Hi Jim,

    Thanks for your advise. However, find it is somehow the weather uncontrollable. What if we all get ready in the morning to shoot portrait and the dun comes out big big? Is there any solution to it?

    I know if I am to open up the aperture, the background will be blurred and isolate my model with the background. On the other hand, by doing so,... will this step fools the metering system in my camera?

    Or I should use spot metering instead of evaluative or partial val?

    really confuse...

    Thanks!
    shoot studio lor.. easier you can control the light

    There is no relationship between focusing and exposure. no worry.
    using various metering option depending on the situation.
    Last edited by jimtong; 11th May 2004 at 02:00 PM.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by gneseew
    Could I know what is the shutter speed which is same as ISO setting ...
    This is called the "Sunny 16" rule. The rule says that in a sunny day with direct sunlight (no overcast) around mid day, the shutter speed is 1/ISO if you set your aperture to f/16. So for example if the ISO you are using is 100, then you set your camera to f/16, 1/125s (the closest to 1/100).

    For Sukoo's A70 where f/16 is not available, you can use the equivalent: f/16 at 1/125s is equivalent to f/8 at 1/250s.

    For model shoot, overcast day is better then sunny day as mentioned, as softer light is more desirable. Metering technique is to use spot meter to meter the model's face, and if your model is chinese, no much compensation is needed as the skin tone will be close to grey. Remember to use AE lock if you are in aperture priority mode.

    Hope that helps.

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    Quote Originally Posted by mmk
    Hi Jim,

    Thanks for your advise. However, find it is somehow the weather uncontrollable. What if we all get ready in the morning to shoot portrait and the dun comes out big big? Is there any solution to it?

    I know if I am to open up the aperture, the background will be blurred and isolate my model with the background. On the other hand, by doing so,... will this step fools the metering system in my camera?

    Or I should use spot metering instead of evaluative or partial val?

    really confuse...

    Thanks!

    Opening the aperture will not cause the shot to overexpose as the shutter will automatically increase in speed. The reason for overexposure is the metering system of the camera gets fooled especially if u are using evaluative or centre weighted metering and the sky takes up a large portion of the frame.... often if that is the case as others have mentioned, u spot meter the face (i.e. dun use evaluative or centre weighted metering) so that u get the face exposed properly... the sky will be slightly overexposed but that's alright if what u are after is the model's face.... and yes if u dun want overexposed face... shoot in the shade... dun include the sky or include less of it lor...

  20. #20

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    i guess what he means is shooting subjects together with the sky, most likely the exposure for the sky is 2 stop away from the subject. if u expose for the subject, the sky will be wash out in white, instead of the blueness that he desire.

    for a start, trust ur metering, matrix or evalutive. pop on a polarizer if u wan the blue skies.

    ~MooEy~

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