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Thread: Your digital workflow..

  1. #21
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    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    England
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    Quote Originally Posted by lytefunk
    Hey, what kind of post processing do you guys do after getting a photo from your cam? Is it the same for web viewing and printing?


    I'll start first with mine, currently using a minolta 7hi, set at sharpen 'soft', saturation +1, contrast -1, ev -0.3, adobe RGB (from some sites, since they were saying the colours were too natural AKA not vivid enough)

    Once on photoshop, it runs through a default workflow of
    USM 350% 0.4 1
    Fade luminosity 100%
    USM 15% 60 0
    Fade luminosity 100%
    levels to expand dynamic range by shifting white and black point to cut-offs in the histogram if neccessary
    curves using a S-curve for contrast increase
    and brightness and contrast if neccessary

    from here, if its for print, i convert to my printers profile or sRGB (depending on self print or developer)

    if its for web,
    reduce to 600x450
    put in watermark
    put in border



    So what do you guys think?
    Reason I'm asking being that I was playing around with photoshop and the auto-color command actually gives me nice colours without that loooong workflow above

    Any idea on how to improve it?

    Some samples of the photos can be found at my gallery below..
    Hope you don't mind but here's a few suggestions which might improve your workflow, though I don't fully understand some of the things you're trying to do.

    1. Firstly the sharpening you do at stage one should be left until last as sharpening introduces artefacts/noise that will get accentuated by your other adjustments. I don't understand the 'Fade Luminosity 100%' but I assume after sharpening you are going straight to edit and changing 'Normal' to 'Luminosity' - As far as I'm aware this has no effect (Are you trying to apply USM to just luminosity to avoid colour artefacts - this can be done in Lab mode using channels)

    2 Your second USM 15% 60 0 is similar to the technique invented by Thomas Knoll (I Believe) which is not actually a sharpening technique but improves 'Local Contrast' and gives the impression of greater clarity or sharpness. I think its subtle but excellent and can be done at any time but again I would tend to leave this until the end of processing.

    3. As for all the rest , Levels, Curves, Contrast and you then mention autocolour you could acheive all this using just curves and the eyedropper tools therein If you just set up your preferences in curves the one time and save them.(go on be brave and don't use levels).

    To do this open curves, select the black(Shadows) eyedropper and double click.. you then get a choice of settings - Change RGB to say 20,20,20. This gives a true neutral black without flooding your shadow areas). Do the same with the white (Highlights) eyedropper RGB say 240,240,240 and the grey (Midtones) RGB 128,128,128. Then Save.

    When you next use curves click on the black eyedropper and click it on the area of your photo you wish to be true black (Ditto with white and Grey eyedroppers) This will help remove incorrect colour casts, improve the dynamic range, improve contrast etc all in one go and is a vast improvement on using any of the 'Auto' functions.

    haven't explained it very well but hope you can understand and hope this helps.

    Stroma

  2. #22

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    hmmmm okok thanks =)
    will try it out


    Quote Originally Posted by stroma
    Hope you don't mind but here's a few suggestions which might improve your workflow, though I don't fully understand some of the things you're trying to do.

    1. Firstly the sharpening you do at stage one should be left until last as sharpening introduces artefacts/noise that will get accentuated by your other adjustments. I don't understand the 'Fade Luminosity 100%' but I assume after sharpening you are going straight to edit and changing 'Normal' to 'Luminosity' - As far as I'm aware this has no effect (Are you trying to apply USM to just luminosity to avoid colour artefacts - this can be done in Lab mode using channels)

    2 Your second USM 15% 60 0 is similar to the technique invented by Thomas Knoll (I Believe) which is not actually a sharpening technique but improves 'Local Contrast' and gives the impression of greater clarity or sharpness. I think its subtle but excellent and can be done at any time but again I would tend to leave this until the end of processing.

    3. As for all the rest , Levels, Curves, Contrast and you then mention autocolour you could acheive all this using just curves and the eyedropper tools therein If you just set up your preferences in curves the one time and save them.(go on be brave and don't use levels).

    To do this open curves, select the black(Shadows) eyedropper and double click.. you then get a choice of settings - Change RGB to say 20,20,20. This gives a true neutral black without flooding your shadow areas). Do the same with the white (Highlights) eyedropper RGB say 240,240,240 and the grey (Midtones) RGB 128,128,128. Then Save.

    When you next use curves click on the black eyedropper and click it on the area of your photo you wish to be true black (Ditto with white and Grey eyedroppers) This will help remove incorrect colour casts, improve the dynamic range, improve contrast etc all in one go and is a vast improvement on using any of the 'Auto' functions.

    haven't explained it very well but hope you can understand and hope this helps.

    Stroma

  3. #23
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Tomato Town
    Posts
    502

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    Quote Originally Posted by stroma
    ...

    3. As for all the rest , Levels, Curves, Contrast and you then mention autocolour you could acheive all this using just curves and the eyedropper tools therein If you just set up your preferences in curves the one time and save them.(go on be brave and don't use levels).

    To do this open curves, select the black(Shadows) eyedropper and double click.. you then get a choice of settings - Change RGB to say 20,20,20. This gives a true neutral black without flooding your shadow areas). Do the same with the white (Highlights) eyedropper RGB say 240,240,240 and the grey (Midtones) RGB 128,128,128. Then Save.

    When you next use curves click on the black eyedropper and click it on the area of your photo you wish to be true black (Ditto with white and Grey eyedroppers) This will help remove incorrect colour casts, improve the dynamic range, improve contrast etc all in one go and is a vast improvement on using any of the 'Auto' functions.

    haven't explained it very well but hope you can understand and hope this helps.

    Stroma
    Thanks for the detail explaination. I prefer to use curve as well and I notice, normally I would at least need to set black and white before I get acceptable tonage. Best is still to set all 3.

    However, I encounter one problem, not all my photos have black, white or grey reference. In this scenario, how do u utilize the curve?

    Thanks.

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