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Thread: Taking photos from public place

  1. #21

    Default Re: Taking photos from public place

    Quote Originally Posted by wildcat View Post
    Heh, okay. Thanks for the feedback... will definitely take note of suggestions and give my feedback to "Management"... if I ever find the top guy. It seems like I'm just being routed from one security person to another and I have a feeling this might have been something they implemented on their own.
    Sounds like those coin-op beat-em ups. You need to fight all the way to the top of the building and the Bozz is sitting silhouetted against the window

    Many rent-a-cops always like to feel important and impose their own rules.
    Hope you manage to speak to the management real soon rather than have them waste your time.

    BTW, if the pavement is paved in their color/building material is it public or private?

  2. #22

    Default Re: Taking photos from public place

    Quote Originally Posted by sabee View Post

    And there's no need to be nasty to security personnel imo, it makes it even harder for other photographers.
    I believe most photographers wont be nasty to security personnel who are polite and friendly. It becomes nasty when these guards have double standards and sounding too demeaning (like shouting at you, hey no photography). For example, if you are told to stop shooting at, say Esplanade, but you can see horde of tourists shooting like no tomorrow, how would you feel?

    this angmo thingy IS really happening, even have witnessed them myself before.
    always the Light, .... always.

  3. #23

    Default Re: Taking photos from public place

    Even the Shuang Lin Shi/Shiong Lim Buddhist Temple forbids photography. I was stopped by one of the people when she saw me taking photo of the temple's architecture. That was a few years ago, when the temple was going to complete it's renovation.

    I was wondering, what are they trying to protect against. It's architecture? Is it a secret or copyright? Makes no sense to me.

  4. #24

    Default Re: Taking photos from public place

    Quote Originally Posted by ireallydontlikepink View Post
    Oh that explains why i was being stopped from taking photo at National Library?
    I thought the security is worried that we are terrorist? ... Trying to map the location?
    Or i too imaginative ...
    You're not imaginative, and you're right about it. Problem is, the security threat is making some people paranoid. They're going through the motion and act in such a manner, hoping as a form of deterrence. Their boundaries are within their premises. Public areas are out of their scope. If you want to play hard ball, ask them to call the police.
    This is a grey area, because tourist is unlikely to be stopped, even for government building. STPB won't be happy and will step in. People can hide video camera to shoot the area, people taking shots from zoom a distance away, etc. Never ends. They act to show. Message to "T" is, stay away. Point is, is the building a potential threat?

    As a matter of fact, the "T" has already won a minor victory, disrupting peace. We're never back to the days where you could snap a shot anyway other than Military facilities. SAD

  5. #25

    Default Re: Taking photos from public place

    Quote Originally Posted by johnlim View Post
    Even the Shuang Lin Shi/Shiong Lim Buddhist Temple forbids photography. I was stopped by one of the people when she saw me taking photo of the temple's architecture. That was a few years ago, when the temple was going to complete it's renovation.

    I was wondering, what are they trying to protect against. It's architecture? Is it a secret or copyright? Makes no sense to me.
    Eh? I shot there and even posted here last year.
    And no, i don't look like a monk

  6. #26
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    Default Re: Taking photos from public place

    this issue can be better tackled if the building's faceless management tells the security people the reason behind the no-photography policy (like what Canonised mentioned).

    the reason why we are pissed is because the security people don't even know the reasons behind the policy... or maybe there is none at all they just happily say "no photography allowed".
    Mythbusters - the bigger the explosion, the better it is.

  7. #27
    Senior Member redstone's Avatar
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    Default Re: Taking photos from public place

    Quote Originally Posted by johnlim View Post
    Even the Shuang Lin Shi/Shiong Lim Buddhist Temple forbids photography. I was stopped by one of the people when she saw me taking photo of the temple's architecture. That was a few years ago, when the temple was going to complete it's renovation.

    I was wondering, what are they trying to protect against. It's architecture? Is it a secret or copyright? Makes no sense to me.
    No photography of the Buddha / Buddhasativ's statues... No close photography of inside the prayer halls.

  8. #28

    Default Re: Taking photos from public place

    Quote Originally Posted by Inflames View Post
    Lol. Crude but true enough.
    Not true at all. I've been requested to stop at loads of places including Parkview Square, both exterior and interior. I've also been stopped at what was then Caltex House in Raffles Place, by security, even though I was on the balcony shooting down at the exhibition area, the Sail when it was being built, the Honeywell building at Changi Business Park, a few other construction sites and even a demolition site. Also a couple of industrial plants at Jurong etc etc, the list goes on.

    It's all about paranoia, not what colour you are. It doesn't help if you have a tripod and an SLR. Because then you're obviously not a tourist, but a terrorist.

    Normally what I do is keep shooting until I've finished, remaining calm and being polite. The security will not manhandle you on public property. However don't try this outside an oil refinery or somewhere owned by an American company. You will get arrested by the colour blind police.
    Last edited by PaulRussell; 3rd June 2010 at 12:21 PM.

  9. #29

    Default Re: Taking photos from public place

    Quote Originally Posted by PaulRussell View Post
    Not true at all. I've been requested to stop at loads of places including Parkview Square, both exterior and interior. I've also been stopped at what was then Caltex House in Raffles Place, by security, even though I was on the balcony shooting down at the exhibition area, the Sail when it was being built, the Honeywell building at Changi Business Park, a few other construction sites and even a demolition site. Also a couple of industrial plants at Jurong etc etc, the list goes on.

    It's all about paranoia, not what colour you are. It doesn't help if you have a tripod and an SLR. Because then you're obviously not a tourist, but a terrorist.

    Normally what I do is keep shooting until I've finished, remaining calm and being polite. The security will not manhandle you on public property. However don't try this outside an oil refinery or somewhere owned by an American company. You will get arrested by the colour blind police.
    Obviously, it is security concern; Maybe they are afraid of terrorist attacks.

  10. #30
    Senior Member wildcat's Avatar
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    Default Re: Taking photos from public place

    Still no conclusion as I am still at home; haven't gone to office yet talk to next "Management" in place.

    However a group of us went to Parkview to shoot with no problem; the only issue is if you try to take inside the building, or the fountain area at the behind, on their side of the road.

    The few of us managed to get the crane area and the security guard came out and we thought he was going to chase us away but he was just going over to talk to a contractor fixing the floor. After that, we hung around 10mins, security guard was also there, so that place is actually okay for photos?

  11. #31
    Member ireallydontlikepink's Avatar
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    Default Re: Taking photos from public place

    Quote Originally Posted by madmacs View Post
    you were stopped at national library? a few years ago i was shooting a friend against the railing outside the library when the security guard approached to tell my friend to be careful. he then suggested i go up to the 9th floor open terrace to shoot. said the view very nice.
    The security is Female is it??
    I was taking the infrastructure outside wor .. NOT inside leh ..
    Then this firm looking security just come over and say NO photography.

    So i guai guai smile and walk off lor.
    LIFE is like Photography. You use the Negatives to develop. The Pictures to prove the beauty.

  12. #32
    Senior Member redstone's Avatar
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    Default Re: Taking photos from public place

    Quote Originally Posted by johnlim View Post
    Obviously, it is security concern; Maybe they are afraid of terrorist attacks.
    So next time they'll stop people doing a sketch of the place? Ban photography might as well ban cameras in the whole of singapore! Now "no photography" signages are nearly as prevalent as "no smoking" signages!

    Double standards are everywhere! So a non local-looking person most probably won't be stopped... Guards make their own rules... so do property owners... why ban photography inside a building? Don't say condo or somewhere where private lives can be "intruded". The lobby of an office building, or say somewhere even more public, shopping centres. Why ban photography? What's the logic from the management?

  13. #33
    Senior Member wildcat's Avatar
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    Default Re: Taking photos from public place

    Quote Originally Posted by johnlim View Post
    Obviously, it is security concern; Maybe they are afraid of terrorist attacks.
    Oil refineries, American Embassy, Parliament buildings, I can understand. Shopping centres, office building...

  14. #34

    Default Re: Taking photos from public place

    Quote Originally Posted by wildcat View Post
    Oil refineries, American Embassy, Parliament buildings, I can understand. Shopping centres, office building...
    Shopping centres have these rules all the while, even in other countries. I think it is for commercial reasons, or it simply is a case of private property. I don't care less if they stop me, just dont' take lor.

  15. #35

    Default Re: Taking photos from public place

    Quote Originally Posted by PaulRussell View Post
    Not true at all. I've been requested to stop at loads of places including Parkview Square, both exterior and interior. I've also been stopped at what was then Caltex House in Raffles Place, by security, even though I was on the balcony shooting down at the exhibition area, the Sail when it was being built, the Honeywell building at Changi Business Park, a few other construction sites and even a demolition site. Also a couple of industrial plants at Jurong etc etc, the list goes on.

    It's all about paranoia, not what colour you are. It doesn't help if you have a tripod and an SLR. Because then you're obviously not a tourist, but a terrorist.

    Normally what I do is keep shooting until I've finished, remaining calm and being polite. The security will not manhandle you on public property. However don't try this outside an oil refinery or somewhere owned by an American company. You will get arrested by the colour blind police.
    Hi Paul, of course it's not always the case, there are exceptions. And obviously, security is the main issue here and carrying a Dslr + tripod really make things difficult for a photographer, it's fool proofed. One good way is to get the shot done quickly and move on, this goes the same when shooting abroad.

    But we can't deny that double standards, especially towards certain type of skin colour is a real thing in Singapore and most Asian countries. There are still alot of Asians helding on to dreams like "there are mountains of gold over the sea".

    I wouldn't want to rant more about my experiences with this issue. And of course, matters are even more obvious in other countries which I don't want to mention.
    Find me beauty, find me kindness, find me truth...

  16. #36

    Default Re: Taking photos from public place

    Quote Originally Posted by Inflames View Post
    Hi Paul, of course it's not always the case, there are exceptions. And obviously, security is the main issue here and carrying a Dslr + tripod really make things difficult for a photographer, it's fool proofed. One good way is to get the shot done quickly and move on, this goes the same when shooting abroad.
    Yep that's the way terrorists work. They don't carry round DSLRs and tripods, they use small handheld video cameras that are hard to spot. The 'no photography' rule is just a way of practicing unnecessary authoritarianism.

    But we can't deny that double standards, especially towards certain type of skin colour is a real thing in Singapore and most Asian countries.
    Racism is everywhere. Ask my 7 and 13 yr old sons, both born here, who were told yesterday by a Chinese Golden Mile shopkeeper that they had no right to be there and should go back home where they came from. Novena, presumably.

    There are still alot of Asians helding on to dreams like "there are mountains of gold over the sea".
    There are no mountains of gold overseas. I've been there.

  17. #37
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    Default Re: Taking photos from public place

    Quote Originally Posted by PaulRussell View Post
    There are no mountains of gold overseas. I've been there.
    but that doesn't stop people from having this perception
    Mythbusters - the bigger the explosion, the better it is.

  18. #38
    Senior Member wildcat's Avatar
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    Default Re: Taking photos from public place

    Quote Originally Posted by johnlim View Post
    Shopping centres have these rules all the while, even in other countries. I think it is for commercial reasons, or it simply is a case of private property. I don't care less if they stop me, just dont' take lor.
    This is the part which I am trying to clarify - are the security guards at these places making up rules of their own as they go along, and just because no one challenges them, they happily take it as "the lawwgh" (spoken in Sylvester Stallone's tone). Left to their own devices, they'd happily go on being Judge Orte.. err, I mean Judge Dread where they are judge, jury and executioner, with disregard to what the real law really says.

    Take for example cycling rules. One cannot cycle on the pavement and can be fined $20 for doing so. Yet if I were Mr Judge, can I just go around imposing that $20 fine on any Tom, Dick and Harry who cycles on the pavement? No, because only an officer of the law can do so. I can, on the other hand, report him to a police and action can be taken, but I cannot take action into my own hands, by making my own interpretations.

  19. #39
    Senior Member wildcat's Avatar
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    Default Re: Taking photos from public place

    Called up the number given, asked for Mayakrishna. The lady mentioned that he will only come in 8pm, asked if I wanted to speak to anyone else. She asked if I want to be transferred to speak to someone else and I did. So I spoke to this guy Manat who simply refused to transfer me to "Management", and kept asking for my name and number (in fact, he claims that Mayakrishna no longer works there). Passed him my name and hp number and now awaiting his call.

    A Mr. Roger Lee called me next and I have the following answers from him:
    1. Juristriction is as long as stepping on the granite area.
    2. Stopping us from taking photographs is because of security reason
    3. I quoted him several instances where I cannot take photos of a building (e.g. oil ref, A.Embassy, Parliament) and some which I can (e.g. Iluma). His reply is that the building management has a right to stop people as long as the person is within the premises (ref #1). If we publish any photos of the building, then a certain fee will have to go to them. I explained that we are not publishing the photos for commercial use and the issue ended there.

    Is this true?

  20. #40
    Senior Member wildcat's Avatar
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    Default Re: Taking photos from public place

    The biggest problem I am facing now is that I cannot find any law which says we cannot take photos, so Management can set the rules as they see fit. I wish there was really a more solid "You Cannot" ruling which makes it easier to contest rather than fighting a ghost.

    This is the closest and it doesn't refer to any hard facts.
    http://sgforums.com/forums/10/topics/388804?page=1
    Then got a lot of references from ClubSnap.
    And then got Wikipedia
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/No_photography


    I'm just wondering which government authority can clarify this so that we can just approach them and at least get a clear cut "NO YOU CAN'T" and that's the end of story. I hate all these grey area issues.
    Last edited by wildcat; 3rd June 2010 at 05:30 PM.

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