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Thread: First Time corporate event shooting

  1. #21

    Default Re: First Time corporate event shooting

    Quote Originally Posted by Profezeur View Post
    I've got a friend wanting me to cover his small corporate event.
    If you don't do a good job, you friend's career might be on the line....

    Since I'm nowhere near in my technical skills as compare to all these seniors... I will not say anything about photography or the equipment....

    But.... you will need to do your homework.
    1. Get to know the environment you will be shooting in... outdoor, indoor, lighting condition, elbow space, location of where everyone are seated, where the stage is.....etc....
    2. Get to know who is who in this event.... you won't want to have any of your photo without the GM, CEO, etc of the company face... probably you would want more...
    3. Get to know the evening program is... what will be happening... what gonna happen...etc.
    4. Plan to position yourself strategically at the right time and right location to get those important shots....
    5. any other homework you can think of....

  2. #22
    Moderator ed9119's Avatar
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    Default Re: First Time corporate event shooting

    Quote Originally Posted by Profezeur View Post
    ..... try and borrow a FF body from a friend...
    a ff will save you ??? you will be shooting at totally different focal lengths that you might not be familiar with assuming u using same lens
    shaddap and just shoot .... up close
    Walkeast

  3. #23

    Default Re: First Time corporate event shooting

    Quote Originally Posted by melwave View Post
    dun mind if i ask, what is the difference?
    Quote Originally Posted by ortega View Post
    the IQ of the resulting image is different
    Quote Originally Posted by catchlights View Post
    usually fast lens has better quality on the build and optical, the overall performance is better then the consumer grade lenses.
    If I could contribute to the already informative answers, in real life terms, and to quantify it, I once read a summary of the difference between low grade consumer, prosumer and professional grade lenses, IQ wise:

    1. A poor quality consumer lens will exhibit poor image quality wide open, and will not improve much even when stopped down a lot.

    2. A good quality prosumer lens will exhibit decent/average results wide open, and start to improve noticeably when closed down, usually over many stops, probably reaching optimum somewhere around f11 - 16.

    3. A professional grade lens will usually exhibit above average or even high quality results wide open, and show slight improvement when stopped down, i.e., it reaches high levels of performance very close to its widest aperture settings, and in the case of some lenses, will not improve much from further stopping down after it hovers around it's early peak.

    This is only a simplification as different categories of lenses are designed for different purposes and will usually behave or perform differently from any set lab benchmarks.
    Last edited by Dream Merchant; 24th May 2010 at 08:40 PM.

  4. #24

    Default Re: First Time corporate event shooting

    Quote Originally Posted by coolthought View Post
    If you don't do a good job, you friend's career might be on the line....

    Since I'm nowhere near in my technical skills as compare to all these seniors... I will not say anything about photography or the equipment....

    But.... you will need to do your homework.
    1. Get to know the environment you will be shooting in... outdoor, indoor, lighting condition, elbow space, location of where everyone are seated, where the stage is.....etc....
    2. Get to know who is who in this event.... you won't want to have any of your photo without the GM, CEO, etc of the company face... probably you would want more...
    3. Get to know the evening program is... what will be happening... what gonna happen...etc.
    4. Plan to position yourself strategically at the right time and right location to get those important shots....
    5. any other homework you can think of....
    Great advise coolthought.

    I would add, if there's enough time/opportunity, try and recce the actual venue before the event, or an hour or two before the actual event and do test shots/get all your adjustments settled. This could save you from 'trouble' during the actual event.

  5. #25
    Senior Member ZerocoolAstra's Avatar
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    Default Re: First Time corporate event shooting

    Quote Originally Posted by jopel View Post
    No I don't swear by fast lens. But there is a different between f/5.6 or f/8 from a fast lens and f/5.6 or f/8 from a 'slow lens'.
    totally agree with you.

    My point was in reference to some people stating that a fast lens is absolutely necessary for indoor photography, as though implying that a 'slow' lens, eg. kit lens will not be able to capture decent shots. Maybe I've read too much into the implications...

    I do think that the TS' f/4 lens could possibly be good enough to cover the event, especially if coupled with a good flash (like 580EXII) and a body capable of suppressing signal noise at high ISO.
    Exploring! :)

  6. #26

    Default Re: First Time corporate event shooting

    Quote Originally Posted by ortega View Post
    the IQ of the resulting image is different
    Quote Originally Posted by catchlights View Post
    usually fast lens has better quality on the build and optical, the overall performance is better then the consumer grade lenses.
    Quote Originally Posted by Dream Merchant View Post
    If I could contribute to the already informative answers, in real life terms, and to quantify it, I once read a summary of the difference between low grade consumer, prosumer and professional grade lenses, IQ wise:

    1. A poor quality consumer lens will exhibit poor image quality wide open, and will not improve much even when stopped down a lot.

    2. A good quality prosumer lens will exhibit decent/average results wide open, and start to improve noticeably when closed down, usually over many stops, probably reaching optimum somewhere around f11 - 16.

    3. A professional grade lens will usually exhibit above average or even high quality results wide open, and show slight improvement when stopped down, i.e., it reaches high levels of performance very close to its widest aperture settings, and in the case of some lenses, will not improve much from further stopping down after it hovers around it's early peak.

    This is only a simplification as different categories of lenses are designed for different purposes and will usually behave or perform differently from any set lab benchmarks.

    Ahh I see, thanks for taking the time to explain.

  7. #27

    Default Re: First Time corporate event shooting

    Yup, the rest have already given you pretty much all the advice you need.

    A few things I'll personally look out for (and repeat from the others) are:
    1. Go to the venue earlier. Look at it, absorb it. Walk around to see which angles work and which won't so you don't run around like a headless chicken.
    2. At the venue, check out the lightning. Find out if there will be dimming of lights during the event and if so, to what extent.
    3. Take a few test shots to gauge the exposure (and also that of the dimmed setting, if there is and if possible)
    4. Talk to your friend to see if there are 'must have' shots that the company definitely wants to see (ie. 10-year awards given out etc etc)
    5. Don't take too long to 'think' the shot. The magic moments would have flown away if you are slow.
    6. The suggestion of 2 cameras, 1 17-40/55 and 1 70-200 has its uses. The longer lens is best used to zoom in 'stealth' mode for those candid shots. Push the 17-40 (or 55) into their faces and you lose the moment.

  8. #28

    Default Re: First Time corporate event shooting

    Quote Originally Posted by Profezeur View Post
    Haha.. Uh-oh...
    I usually stick it on E-TTL and plonk on a lightsphere, keeping it pointed up most of the time.
    I have a feeling i shld just leave this to the pros.
    I just wanna try it out this one time.

    Venue's not confirmed. But i just want to be as prepared as i can be so that i dun drown when thrown into the deep end...
    Quote Originally Posted by ZerocoolAstra View Post
    what you have done would probably work most of the time.
    But if the ceiling is very high, you won't be able to bounce the flash. So then you need to know what to do

    sorry to stress you out. If you HAVE to deliver results, you need to be prepared
    since the lightsphere is mentioned. just like to add something.
    there is this additional chrome dome (TS probably has) that can be added on to direct light forward (and all round horizontally) when flash is pointing upward.

    check out the review of this diffuser.
    review 1
    review 2

    conclusion... get the right flash with the right diffuser and using it the right way will gonna make that lady boss look ten years younger....and earn your friend a promotion??

  9. #29
    Member kaylan2000's Avatar
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    Default Re: First Time corporate event shooting

    I do think that the TS' f/4 lens could possibly be good enough to cover the event, especially if coupled with a good flash (like 580EXII) and a body capable of suppressing signal noise at high ISO.
    Again depends on lighting condition on the stage. I once had very hard time with my 17-40 f/4... thats why I feel a lower f is always handy. And in many places/situation, flash may not be desirable
    1Ds II | EF 16-35L| EF 24-105L | EF 35f/2.0 | EF 50f/1.8 | EF 85f/1.8 | EF 100L |EF 70-300L| EX 550

  10. #30
    Senior Member ZerocoolAstra's Avatar
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    Default Re: First Time corporate event shooting

    Quote Originally Posted by kaylan2000 View Post
    Again depends on lighting condition on the stage. I once had very hard time with my 17-40 f/4... thats why I feel a lower f is always handy. And in many places/situation, flash may not be desirable

    You're right.
    faster lens = $$$ that's all... Sometimes for less than 1-stop advantage in speed, the price premium is quite scary. Of course this doesn't take into account other factors like better IQ, build quality, etc.
    Exploring! :)

  11. #31
    Member kaylan2000's Avatar
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    Default Re: First Time corporate event shooting

    Quote Originally Posted by ZerocoolAstra View Post

    You're right.
    faster lens = $$$ that's all... Sometimes for less than 1-stop advantage in speed, the price premium is quite scary. Of course this doesn't take into account other factors like better IQ, build quality, etc.
    True .. Lenses are one time investment.
    1Ds II | EF 16-35L| EF 24-105L | EF 35f/2.0 | EF 50f/1.8 | EF 85f/1.8 | EF 100L |EF 70-300L| EX 550

  12. #32

    Default Re: First Time corporate event shooting

    i think u should read up n view more photos on events instead of choosing ur equipment.Think abt the things that u wan to take before the night then u will roughly noe the range of lens to bring

  13. #33
    Member pasay's Avatar
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    Default Re: First Time corporate event shooting

    Quote Originally Posted by Sivakis View Post
    Yup, the rest have already given you pretty much all the advice you need.

    A few things I'll personally look out for (and repeat from the others) are:
    1. Go to the venue earlier. Look at it, absorb it. Walk around to see which angles work and which won't so you don't run around like a headless chicken.
    2. At the venue, check out the lightning. Find out if there will be dimming of lights during the event and if so, to what extent.
    3. Take a few test shots to gauge the exposure (and also that of the dimmed setting, if there is and if possible)
    4. Talk to your friend to see if there are 'must have' shots that the company definitely wants to see (ie. 10-year awards given out etc etc)
    5. Don't take too long to 'think' the shot. The magic moments would have flown away if you are slow.
    6. The suggestion of 2 cameras, 1 17-40/55 and 1 70-200 has its uses. The longer lens is best used to zoom in 'stealth' mode for those candid shots. Push the 17-40 (or 55) into their faces and you lose the moment.
    One more thing I'd like to add, since it's been nicely summarized by sivakis :

    Try to get to the venue (if you can get permission) a few nights before and test ALL your equipment there. Like a rehearsal of sorts. If you can't get permission or your friend can't tell you the venue til the last minute, get at least the general info (indoor, outdoor, time of day, etc) and practice with as close to the venue's conditions as possible a few days before the event. Nobody wants to see a practice session on the big day.

  14. #34

    Default Re: First Time corporate event shooting

    Quote Originally Posted by kaylan2000 View Post
    True .. Lenses are one time investment.
    You sure? When a Mark II comes out, with IS, new coating, new lens element, etc. People start to salivate over it

  15. #35
    Moderator daredevil123's Avatar
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    Default Re: First Time corporate event shooting

    Quote Originally Posted by kaylan2000 View Post
    True .. Lenses are one time investment.
    I bet you'll rethink that stand, once any of you lenses need cleaning or repair.

    There is no such thing as a one time investment in equipment.

  16. #36
    Member kaylan2000's Avatar
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    Default Re: First Time corporate event shooting

    Quote Originally Posted by neech7 View Post
    You sure? When a Mark II comes out, with IS, new coating, new lens element, etc. People start to salivate over it
    Not really, many people are very happy with their OLD WORK HORSES..... like old wife you know each other and you live happily with each other with the known limitations
    1Ds II | EF 16-35L| EF 24-105L | EF 35f/2.0 | EF 50f/1.8 | EF 85f/1.8 | EF 100L |EF 70-300L| EX 550

  17. #37
    Member kaylan2000's Avatar
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    Default Re: First Time corporate event shooting

    Quote Originally Posted by daredevil123 View Post
    I bet you'll rethink that stand, once any of you lenses need cleaning or repair.

    There is no such thing as a one time investment in equipment.
    I correct myself .. LONG TERM is the right word
    1Ds II | EF 16-35L| EF 24-105L | EF 35f/2.0 | EF 50f/1.8 | EF 85f/1.8 | EF 100L |EF 70-300L| EX 550

  18. #38

    Default Re: First Time corporate event shooting

    Quote Originally Posted by kaylan2000 View Post
    Again depends on lighting condition on the stage. I once had very hard time with my 17-40 f/4... thats why I feel a lower f is always handy. And in many places/situation, flash may not be desirable
    I have to agree as i have shot quite a few corporate events for my company.

    17-40 is a wonderful lens with great contrast and colours. But indoors as i have found, the f/4 very limiting and you will need to use quite a bit of flash/bump iso just to get correct exposure.

    I now use a practical setup of Tamron 28-75mm on FF and 85mm 1.8 on a crop. I make it a point never to shoot beyond 60mm on the 28-75mm as I do not have the skill to get sharp pics indoors without IS.

    I have also tried shooting with a 35mm on FF and 85mm on a crop and that has yielded better quality photos although i had to spend more effort manually zooming.

  19. #39

    Default Re: First Time corporate event shooting

    Hi Guys...
    Thanks so much for all the advice given..

    I've got 1 last qn to ask..

    I lost my lightsphere and have gone out to buy a whaletail..
    Wat shld my camera setting rougly be when shooting ETTL with whaletail on??

  20. #40

    Default Re: First Time corporate event shooting

    Honestly?

    Set it at ISO 400 - 800, and use 'P'-rofessional mode (Programme mode). When in doubt about color balance, shoot in smaller RAW, unless you foresee printing A3 sizes and larger, then use larger RAW.

    Let the camera worry about exposure, unless you would like to familiarize yourself with the EOS flash system:

    http://photonotes.org/articles/eos-flash/


    All the best for your shoot.

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