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Thread: Usage for long term investments

  1. #1

    Default Usage for long term investments

    Hi. Recently, I had a feel of the Canon 300D and Nikon D70. Im not trying to start a war here, i jus need more information.

    I am currently a student. I am wondering, which is a better choice. Because mainly Canon has 3rd party accessories which I believe is easier to find and cheaper than Nikon 3rd party accessories. I also heard that the auto focus for D70 is slower than the 300D, bud is is slower by a lot ? I hope to hear from you guys out there. Thanks alot =)

  2. #2

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    Again I would likes to say it, it is the photographer who make great pictures not the camera itself.

    So if you likes Nikon, go for it and the same go for Canon. Camera is just a tool, so choose your gears which gives you more feeling ...

    Dun go for hearsay, try it and prove it to urself ..
    AMPA * WPPI * J team

  3. #3

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    Haha...see if my advice helps.
    Go look for your fellow photography friends and see what most of the have.

    The reason being you can borrow equipment from them next time.

    It's not going to make much difference going with either Nikon or Canon. Probably the million and oneth time saying this: each system got their own strengths and weakness.

    If you still can't decide, go toss a coin. It's that simple.

    3rd-party accessories and 2nd-hand components for both systems are relatively easy to find because of the large user base. Neither system is cheaper to acquire compared to the other.
    Last edited by Ah Pao; 11th April 2004 at 12:07 PM.

  4. #4
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    There are things from/made for Canon that are more expensive compared to Nikon counterparts and the vice versa is true. A more constructive way of evaluating this situation is to actually decide what you need for your photographic needs. Only when you know what you need, you can start comparing prices in a more meaningful manner. When you buy an SLR, you've got to think beyond camera bodies and see your purchase as a whole system.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by allcowsmoo
    Hi. Recently, I had a feel of the Canon 300D and Nikon D70. Im not trying to start a war here, i jus need more information.

    I am currently a student. I am wondering, which is a better choice. Because mainly Canon has 3rd party accessories which I believe is easier to find and cheaper than Nikon 3rd party accessories. I also heard that the auto focus for D70 is slower than the 300D, bud is is slower by a lot ? I hope to hear from you guys out there. Thanks alot =)
    Digital cameras does not make good long term investment. If you really want long term investment, buy a film camera.

  6. #6
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    Start with a EOS 300/33 and a 28-105 lens. Technology is never a long term investment. Film is a long term invesment and cheap.

  7. #7

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    Haha...I feel the heat coming not from the Nikon and Canon camps, but the film and digital camps...

    Again, both film and digital got their own distinct strengths and weakness. BTW, film is also a kind of technology.

    Just get something that fits your budget and needs, and you'll be very happy.

    You said you had a feel for both cameras. So why not borrow both for a while, or go a camera shop, and see which one you like better?

    Choosing a system is a very personal thing. It should never be decided based on paper specifications alone.

  8. #8

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    i started photgraphy a year ago wif my minolta film camera. figured out that minolta parts are really ex !, and im not familier wif dslr and stuff's market. so yupp.

  9. #9

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    A person with true photography in heart will care how well the picture he produced. Model and brand only mean speed, conveinences and personal preferences. If the gear he bring is limited or missing 1 len, he will try to shoot at his best or work with it's limitation to take advantage to produce.

    Also, probably he doesn't have so much time arguing abt gear/format or interested to teach people because even he is right, most of the time he will meet many that talk alot but never about to produce and yet think they are right or good.

    That is why even great Jesus, people spited on him, laugh at him and say he is mad etc. In this world, there will also people who disagree with you and choose the opposite way no matter what is the fact.

    Not surprise to say that most people are technology greek or when they have cash, they would think of buying a new toy will really help them to take good photograph. With the modern technology, it is not difficult to produce technological good picture. Good photography is another different thing. Most are not even confident to use a fully mechanical camera of any brand other then what they are comfortable with and something they know how to operate. Otherwise, all camera are the same.

    People talking about buying ultrasharp len and yet shoot handheld beyond the focal length rule, how can it be sharp in the first place? I hope you all know what is the focal length rule. There are people who laugh at me saying he can handheld 4 seconds to shoot night scene and I can't. Haha, I really cannot and I do not think they can either

    Then I hear comment about amateur versus professional film. All films change color balance as they age. Amatur film is marketed with the asumption that it won't be exposed and processed promptly after it is purchased. Consequently, amatuer, or consumer, film is released onto the market quite early in its color life.

    Professional films are meant to be exposed and processed quickly. This is why they're marketed at their optimum color balance.

    All photographers have their own preferences when it comes to color renditions, grain, and sharpness of individual films. How do you know tell the recorded on Velvia or Provia is the correct yellow? I'm not refering to its color quality here. No one film is perfectly suited for all subjetcs, in all lighting conditions.

    Consider the following example. You're shooting for a major client whose product has a certain identifianle color, such as the yellow of Kodak's film boxes. You would want to make sure that the film you used would be consistent in color rendition from roll to roll. But suppose you're shooting a nature photograph. What exactly is the correct color of a cherry tree or of a sunset?

    Maybe I might spur up some heat, but then nothing to feel heat about, just go shoot more and ask what have you produce today with your camera gear. Are they better and better each time and not with mouth.

    Relax pal, shoot more.
    Last edited by whoelse; 18th April 2004 at 09:00 PM.

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