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Thread: film scanners

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    Default film scanners

    Hi guys, does anyone have any experience with film scanners? i'm thinking of getting one through e bay but i don't know what to look out for, or are there better places to get one?

    Cheers,
    Jh

  2. #2
    Moderator Octarine's Avatar
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    Default Re: film scanners

    Quote Originally Posted by iahnij View Post
    Hi guys, does anyone have any experience with film scanners? i'm thinking of getting one through e bay but i don't know what to look out for, or are there better places to get one?
    There is a section for 35mm film (that's where photo scanners usually are needed) and an equipment section for scanners - both with plenty of information. If you feed your thread title to the Search function (upper right hand) you will find even more. Please don't expect spoonfeeding.
    EOS

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    Senior Member giantcanopy's Avatar
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    Default Re: film scanners

    I used to have an old coolscan from nikon to archive older 35mm films, but since i switched to dslr, i shelved it away. u can still see some of these coolscans or other brands such as microtek etc being sold online here. alternatively u can just use a flatbed scanner as well but the output of a dedicated film scanner will be better.

    ryan

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    Default Re: film scanners

    Example of a not-too-bad budget flatbed is the CanoScan 8800F - approximately $300 new. Not as sharp as I'd like it to be, but for web purposes, I'm ok with it. If I wanted prints, I'd bring the negs to print, not the scans...
    incywincyspider climbup the waterspout...

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    Default Re: film scanners

    Quote Originally Posted by karnage View Post
    Example of a not-too-bad budget flatbed is the CanoScan 8800F - approximately $300 new. Not as sharp as I'd like it to be, but for web purposes, I'm ok with it. If I wanted prints, I'd bring the negs to print, not the scans...
    The problem is that the prints often don't match the scans. I am still trying to overcome this myself.

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    Member zk-diq's Avatar
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    Default Re: film scanners

    Quote Originally Posted by kaixiang View Post
    The problem is that the prints often don't match the scans. I am still trying to overcome this myself.
    dont mind I ask, how do you print? inkjet/lab color print??

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    Default Re: film scanners

    Quote Originally Posted by zk-diq View Post
    dont mind I ask, how do you print? inkjet/lab color print??
    Lab color print from negatives. I am just trying out stuff for fun, nothing important. The next time I will try getting contact sheets done so that I can tell them what to adjust before printing.

    Most stuff are actually ok. The problem I had was shadows being blocked out in the photo of a black dog.
    Last edited by kaixiang; 11th May 2010 at 09:19 PM.

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    Member zk-diq's Avatar
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    Default Re: film scanners

    Quote Originally Posted by kaixiang View Post
    Lab color print from negatives. I am just trying out stuff for fun, nothing important. The next time I will try getting contact sheets done so that I can tell them what to adjust before printing.

    Most stuff are actually ok. The problem I had was shadows being blocked out in the photo of a black dog.
    Those days, all lab will have a standard neg from manufacturer which contain High light/Mid tone/Shadow and catch light (include a portrait and colour patch plus neutral gray scale). This is for lab to do their quality check/control, ensure that chemical/exposure unit/colour/gray balance/density range is within tolerance. However, very few of them do so. Now I dont think that any one is do that (cost/time).

    I will suggest when ever you take picture, just waste one frame place a 18% gray card in the scene for reference. It will be much easier for colour correction / calibration in later stage. (with a D0.0/0.3/0.7/1.0/1.7/2.4 Gray card best) This will be your reference point to check your print, if the developer over replenish, or too high of temp, the contrast will increase, or if not in neutral colour, then colour balance is out.

    When you do your own scanning, is also your important reference point for colour/density range/gray balance.

    Effective and easy way. But not many people do that. They believe some complicated gadget and wonder around. haha

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    Default Re: film scanners

    Quote Originally Posted by zk-diq View Post
    Effective and easy way. But not many people do that. They believe some complicated gadget and wonder around. haha
    Very true. When you think about it, you need to waste a lot of film to add up to the cost of these gadgets plus invest time in learning how to use them. With a grey card, it only takes 1 step to color balance.

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