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Thread: Problems of pictures with bright sky...

  1. #41

    Default Re: Problems of pictures with bright sky...

    Quote Originally Posted by voxies09 View Post
    normally i will use full auto settings in my 550D, and see what is the aperture, shuttle speed, & ISO...is it the correct way to learn?
    the correct way depends on you.

    however, i doubt you will learn much based on what the camera selects. reading up first, before understanding what iso, aperture, shutter speed do in turn, and applying this to your photographs when you try it out.................... that is the way i learnt.

    although i very seriously much doubt you will learn much from what the camera thinks is best. it's a machine after all. what it selects is based on science, and photography is more than just science.

  2. #42
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    Default Re: Problems of pictures with bright sky...

    Quote Originally Posted by lankyal View Post
    I read about the sunny 16 rule in another thread.

    Just wondering if this would this rule help TS in getting the correct exposure.
    Yes. Using the photo diavonex posted as an example, you can see that the shadows are a bit soft around the edges. This puts the exposure 1 stop below Sunny 16 (Cloudy 11). Without actually being there, I can guess that the correct exposure would be f/11, ISO 100, 1/125s or equivalent.

    While using manual mode is going to be slightly more tedious, as long as the light doesn't change, your exposures will be a lot more consistent than auto.

  3. #43
    Senior Member Diavonex's Avatar
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    Default Re: Problems of pictures with bright sky...

    wallacetham, I want you to do this on a sunny day with your CPL:

    1. Stand with the sun on your left or right i.e. your shadow must be either on your left or right.

    2. Point your camera to the sky and concentrate on the area between the blue sky and clouds (if there's no cloud, concentrate on the blue sky)

    3. Turn your CPL; you'll be able to see the sky goes from light to dark and vise versa. Keep doing it until you can see the effect of the CPL

    4. Keep practising and you'll get the hang of using a CPL

    Note: You can use Auto Mode initially. If the pictures are too dark, compensate +0.7EV or +1.0EV. Over-exposure will reduce the effect of your Polarising Filter.

  4. #44

    Default Re: Problems of pictures with bright sky...

    Quote Originally Posted by kaixiang View Post
    Yes. Using the photo diavonex posted as an example, you can see that the shadows are a bit soft around the edges. This puts the exposure 1 stop below Sunny 16 (Cloudy 11). Without actually being there, I can guess that the correct exposure would be f/11, ISO 100, 1/125s or equivalent.

    While using manual mode is going to be slightly more tedious, as long as the light doesn't change, your exposures will be a lot more consistent than auto.
    Thanks for the feedback, will go try out this rule when the opportunity arises.

    Cheers.

  5. #45
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    Default Re: Problems of pictures with bright sky...

    Quote Originally Posted by Diavonex View Post
    wallacetham, I want you to do this on a sunny day with your CPL:

    1. Stand with the sun on your left or right i.e. your shadow must be either on your left or right.

    2. Point your camera to the sky and concentrate on the area between the blue sky and clouds (if there's no cloud, concentrate on the blue sky)

    3. Turn your CPL; you'll be able to see the sky goes from light to dark and vise versa. Keep doing it until you can see the effect of the CPL

    4. Keep practising and you'll get the hang of using a CPL

    Note: You can use Auto Mode initially. If the pictures are too dark, compensate +0.7EV or +1.0EV. Over-exposure will reduce the effect of your Polarising Filter.
    Thanks bro, I will try out tomorrow.

    So do you mean that CPL will hv no significant effect when we are facing the sun or the sun behind us? It don't work the same way like our polarized sunglass?

    How about taking pictures with water reflection? How to use CPL to reduce reflection on the water surface?
    Canon 500D, Tamron 17-50 f2.8, Nissin Di622

  6. #46
    Senior Member Diavonex's Avatar
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    Default Re: Problems of pictures with bright sky...

    Quote Originally Posted by wallacetham View Post
    Thanks bro, I will try out tomorrow.

    So do you mean that CPL will hv no significant effect when we are facing the sun or the sun behind us? It don't work the same way like our polarized sunglass?

    How about taking pictures with water reflection? How to use CPL to reduce reflection on the water surface?
    Yes, no significant effect if you shoot into the sun or if sun is behind you.

    A polarising filter can eliminate reflection and make water and other reflective surfaces more transparent.

    For best effect shoot between 9:30am to 10:30am when the sun is relatively low.

    Suggest you read this:

    http://www.great-landscape-photograp...ng-filter.html
    Last edited by Diavonex; 7th May 2010 at 08:36 PM.

  7. #47

    Default Re: Problems of pictures with bright sky...

    from what i had learn recently using HDR techique, you can have a picture consists of different exposures.

    For HDR, TS you can try to use the bracketing function on your camera to take a series of pictures with different exposures. For my D200, I am able to take 3 >5>7>9 shots of different exposures.

    After taking the series of images (different exposures), use photoshop to merge the image into HDR or use the program Photomatrix. Both of these programs help to compress and merge the images into one image.

    Hope that it helps.

    Btw, I wish to ask the seniors here. For HDR technique, do I have to take in RAW or in JPEG format? Heard from my friend its best to take with JPEG. so i wish to have an answer to my question. Thanks in advance

  8. #48
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    Default Re: Problems of pictures with bright sky...

    Quote Originally Posted by kaiqi07 View Post
    from what i had learn recently using HDR techique, you can have a picture consists of different exposures.

    For HDR, TS you can try to use the bracketing function on your camera to take a series of pictures with different exposures. For my D200, I am able to take 3 >5>7>9 shots of different exposures.

    After taking the series of images (different exposures), use photoshop to merge the image into HDR or use the program Photomatrix. Both of these programs help to compress and merge the images into one image.

    Hope that it helps.

    Btw, I wish to ask the seniors here. For HDR technique, do I have to take in RAW or in JPEG format? Heard from my friend its best to take with JPEG. so i wish to have an answer to my question. Thanks in advance
    if you are putting 9 RAWs to compose a HDR, that would need a huge PC memory to handle it .

    You can process HDR from multiple RAWs, Multiple Jpegs or Single RAW.
    The followings link will show you the results.

    http://jakob.montrasio.net/2007/04/1...ws-vs-3-jpegs/

    What would majority of the people prefer ? RAW or Jpeg

    http://www.flickr.com/groups/hdr/dis...7603956798887/

    It looks like many of them prefer RAW
    Last edited by kutten; 11th May 2010 at 12:18 PM.

  9. #49
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    Default Re: Problems of pictures with bright sky...

    Quote Originally Posted by kaiqi07 View Post
    from what i had learn recently using HDR techique, you can have a picture consists of different exposures.

    For HDR, TS you can try to use the bracketing function on your camera to take a series of pictures with different exposures. For my D200, I am able to take 3 >5>7>9 shots of different exposures.

    After taking the series of images (different exposures), use photoshop to merge the image into HDR or use the program Photomatrix. Both of these programs help to compress and merge the images into one image.

    Hope that it helps.

    Btw, I wish to ask the seniors here. For HDR technique, do I have to take in RAW or in JPEG format? Heard from my friend its best to take with JPEG. so i wish to have an answer to my question. Thanks in advance
    in fact, you can just try it with both Jpegs and RAWs and judge by yourself, and see which will give you a satisfy result. It should not take you a lot of time.

    Don't hear by words, trust your own eyes.
    Last edited by kutten; 11th May 2010 at 12:23 PM. Reason: more comments

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