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Thread: A full spectrum camera?

  1. #1

    Default A full spectrum camera?

    Is there such a thing sold in Singapore or
    do you have to modify a digital camera on your own?

    Defination of full spectrum:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Full-spectrum_photography


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  2. #2
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    Default Re: A full spectrum camera?

    looks cool... i also wan 1...
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  3. #3

    Default Re: A full spectrum camera?

    isn't that just a modified ir camera

  4. #4
    Senior Member limwhow's Avatar
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    Default Re: A full spectrum camera?

    After reading the link, it seems to me that this Full Spectrum camera has it's usual IR Blocking filter removed, but instead of a usual IR filter, it may have perhaps just another piece of glass in.
    Thus allowing a full spectrum from Ultra-violet rays of around 390nm, all the way through the visible spectrum, up to infrared level of longer wavelength than 700nm (up to 1000nm and even beyond).
    This would give a unique picture consisting not only of visible colour rays, but also UV and IR characteristic.
    Hmmm... I am sure this can be easily done by those who modify cameras... just use a normal piece of glass, perhaps...?
    My humble opinion.

  5. #5

    Default Re: A full spectrum camera?

    there used to be a fujifilm camera that did just that. fujifilm is-1?

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  7. #7
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    Default Re: A full spectrum camera?

    Quote Originally Posted by limwhow View Post
    After reading the link, it seems to me that this Full Spectrum camera has it's usual IR Blocking filter removed, but instead of a usual IR filter, it may have perhaps just another piece of glass in.
    Thus allowing a full spectrum from Ultra-violet rays of around 390nm, all the way through the visible spectrum, up to infrared level of longer wavelength than 700nm (up to 1000nm and even beyond).
    This would give a unique picture consisting not only of visible colour rays, but also UV and IR characteristic.
    Hmmm... I am sure this can be easily done by those who modify cameras... just use a normal piece of glass, perhaps...?
    My humble opinion.
    remember not to use UV filter? else defeat the purpose.
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  8. #8

    Default Re: A full spectrum camera?

    Quote Originally Posted by Del_CtrlnoAlt View Post
    remember not to use UV filter? else defeat the purpose.
    use pure fluorite lenses for optimal uv photog, else even normal glass elements absorb uv
    pedantic.

  9. #9
    Senior Member limwhow's Avatar
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    Default Re: A full spectrum camera?

    Quote Originally Posted by Del_CtrlnoAlt View Post
    remember not to use UV filter? else defeat the purpose.
    Haha... yah, good point there!

  10. #10
    Senior Member Sion's Avatar
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    Default Re: A full spectrum camera?

    Quote Originally Posted by sbs99 View Post
    Is there such a thing sold in Singapore or
    do you have to modify a digital camera on your own?
    Try this filter:


  11. #11

    Default Re: A full spectrum camera?

    I work in a camera and lens repair company which also modifies cameras for specific industrial, scientific and surveillance applications, including spectral modifications.

    As another member said, or as published, a full-spectrum camera theoretically accepts the transmission and capture of EM waves from UV to IR. The bandpass filter, or some call it "hot mirror", rejects UV and IR, and only allows visible light (or more correctly, what is visible only to human eye) to reach the imaging sensor.

    When this bandpass filter is removed, the imaging sensor is able to "see" UV and IR. It has a wider spectral response. However, it is interesting to note that UVA is effectively blocked out by the ozone layer, and UVB is effectively blocked out by glass, hence UV photography is probably and possibly mostly composed of UVC and other UV categories.

    Recently, I used a full-spectrum modified Nikon D70 from my company. Although interesting surreal images can be made, I haven't developed a liking for full-spectrum or UV photography. I prefer IR.

    One advantage for modifying a digital camera to full-spectrum is that you can attach different grades of IR filters to the front of the lens. I used the full-spectrum D70 with 720nm and 950nm filters.

  12. #12
    Deregistered shaoken's Avatar
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    Default Re: A full spectrum camera?

    Quote Originally Posted by Sion View Post
    Try this filter:

    There's such a filter??

  13. #13

  14. #14

    Default Re: A full spectrum camera?

    Quote Originally Posted by Sion View Post
    Try this filter:

    I have seen a similar filter at work. It blocks out all visible light, and appears to have a rainbow-like reflective mirror surface where you can see your own reflection in it. It is a UV-pass filter that transmits around/below 340nm (or there abouts).

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