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Thread: Qns on Street-Shooting

  1. #1
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    Default Qns on Street-Shooting

    Hi all,

    got some qns on streetshooting....when you are shooting someone or some stuffs on sale, do we need to ask permission from the subject or the boss?

    was worried might get scolding......

    how? any tips?

    thanks.....

  2. #2

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    yes asking permission for any photo shoot be it taking the shop's product or the boss itself just ask nicely they wouldn't scold you or chase you out if they do not allow they would tell you nicely, don't worry, also don't be too shy to ask for permission for any photography shoot. Hope the above helps.

    Cheers,
    Henry

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by plinius
    Hi all,

    got some qns on streetshooting....when you are shooting someone or some stuffs on sale, do we need to ask permission from the subject or the boss?

    was worried might get scolding......

    how? any tips?

    thanks.....
    I always ask permission to take pics lor...and I always suceeded in doing so lor..always try to be friendly and ppl will do the same to you too!

  4. #4

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    ok lah..2b fair...soemtimes its very obvious u got to ask or else run like hell after u shoot in that particular scenario

    but then soemtimes its obvious that if u flank abit then...actually no need to ask

    as to how obliged u prefer to ask permission..it will be a matter of personal personality.

  5. #5

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    It depend. For some scene, like candid shot, it defect the purpose by asking permission. Just be tactful and be ready to smile back if got caught.. usually should be ok lah. But sometime my common sense tells me that I got to ask

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by jimtong
    It depend. For some scene, like candid shot, it defect the purpose by asking permission. Just be tactful and be ready to smile back if got caught.. usually should be ok lah. But sometime my common sense tells me that I got to ask
    So do you have any experience on taking candid shot and the person don't like it?

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ice
    So do you have any experience on taking candid shot and the person don't like it?
    yup, smile and move on!

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ice
    So do you have any experience on taking candid shot and the person don't like it?
    hmm... let me think... so far so good, except a month back, I was wondering around Little India and saw 2 old ah bengs, they were sitting under a table with a big shade, they were not talking, but just not facing each other. Then in the middle of the table was a used computer monitor. Was thinking that it was a potential shot and about to aim, but then they look towards me without smiling, one of them waving his hand indicating that he do not want to be shoot.

    So no choice got to walk away lor. who knows what will happen next if I shoot...

    Streetshooting not easy man

  9. #9

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    Most of my photography is street. I have never asked for permission before. Some useful tips which I have learnt and practiced:

    a. be brave. i have only been 'rejected' once. On a few occasions (like today) people have posed and waved at me.

    b. if your subject notices you after you have shot them, wave and smile and walk on. But don't shoot if they obviously don't want you to shoot.

    technically, try to use manual exposure. Because of the fleeting nature of street shooting, there is no time for you to look at camera meter and decide whether to compensate for exposure or not. My method is to take a reading of my hand in bright sun and in shade and then to guesstimate the rest of the exposure settings. Most of the time, you will find only a one stop difference.

    Perhaps you want to look at this guys website for some more tips and techniques. You can cut and paste cos I don't know how to hyperlink:

    http://www.pinkheadedbug.com/home.html

  10. #10
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    It really depends on the situation. As mentioned before, it really defeats the purpose of a candid if it's better captured without the subjects knowing. While there are also situations where coperation from the subject would benefit from a better posed picture. There are also times which requires spontaneous shots...

    Head on to http://www.inthestreet.net/ - a website dedicated to street photography. Read up there..

    Good luck. Hope to see ur photos soon!

  11. #11

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    I like to do streetshooting also but always fear that after I have taken the shoot, the person don't like. As what others have said, smile and walk off, but what if the person stops you and demand to delete the picture or for film camera case, to destroy the whole roll of film how?

    Well another issue is that after taking candid shot without the person notice, if we post the picture onto online gallery, and the person sees the posting, can he press a legal lawsuit against the photographer?

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ice
    I like to do streetshooting also but always fear that after I have taken the shoot, the person don't like. As what others have said, smile and walk off, but what if the person stops you and demand to delete the picture or for film camera case, to destroy the whole roll of film how?

    Well another issue is that after taking candid shot without the person notice, if we post the picture onto online gallery, and the person sees the posting, can he press a legal lawsuit against the photographer?
    I may not be the best person to provide advice on this but from my experience...

    If he shows displeasure at having his picture taken, you smile and go away. If he demands the pic deleted/destroy the film, tell him you're merely shooting in a public place... and that if he damages your equipment, you've got rights to press charges against him...

    Generally, he wouldnt be able to sue you unless he's the predominant face in the picture and u sell the photo for $$. For editorial purposes, he cant do anythin to you...

    Someone please correct me if I'm wrong in any way and kindly add on so as to provide a clearer picture to those reading.

    Cheers!

  13. #13
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    It's always nice to ask first, and if the subject agrees, well and good. Sometimes they ask for prints, and if you're willing, you can always send them a copy to be nice, or give them your business-card if they want it, especially if you're a professional photographer on assignment or in the course of doing journalism or whatever.

    Candid shots, i guess there's not very much you can do but shoot first and worry about it later, but that's the risk you take. I always try to ask first to keep out of trouble... judging your subject might very well be more important, because some older folks do not like to be intruded upon... taking photos in their face, ESPECIALLY with flashes, is intrusive and rude.

    However, i believe you retain ownership of your own equipment and films, and there are only copyright issues if you're taking photos in the course of being employed by the subject, or there is some other kind of financial or conditional agreement involved in getting the shot. I guess the nature of the shot is more relevant... who is in it, what kind of shot it is(indecent?), and what you do with it (defamatory? publishing in some girlie site? tsk, tsk... ). In any case, it's up to them to take up action if they want to, nobody can force you to destroy your films or equipment, since you own it.

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    Unhappy

    Once on my day off, I was at Plaza S'pura at the cinema level around 10am. After taking a few shots of the entire complex, a cinema staff approached me and said that I am not allowed to take photos cos they can take action against me. I asked him what action will they be taking. Is it unlawful to take pics of the interior of a shpping complex?

  15. #15

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    i've shot plaza sing numerous times.

    nothing wrong.

    most of the time it's only yourself that's feeling bad about taking people's photos. sometimes they don't even notice.

    it's just like that.

    i've shot thousands of people
    and i've never got approached.
    except once
    but i didn't even shoot him... i think he was one of those dudes earning money selling charity tickets.

  16. #16
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    Correct me if I am wrong...saw in the Newspaper some time back abt the subject of photography in the streets.
    A lawyer was quoted as saying that it's alright to shoot...but if the person you are shooting tells you to stop..then you should..and if you continue shooting him/her...the person has the right to ask you to delete the photos or handover the roll of film as the photographer has contravened the rights of personal privacy..or something to this effect.
    Now shooting inside and/or within a building open to the public is not similar to shooting in a public place..and the owner and/or his authorised reps(security personnel, Management staff) can stop one from taking fotos within their boundaries.
    hope this clears some matters pertaining to "street photography"

  17. #17
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    In addition to that, think the owner of the building also has the same right that you do not take picture of his building. Its the same as infringing personal rights.

    I mean you won't appreciate people taking shots of your house etc. Security guards of certain buildings have requested that I stop. So just stop and walk away.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by coke21
    In addition to that, think the owner of the building also has the same right that you do not take picture of his building. Its the same as infringing personal rights.

    I mean you won't appreciate people taking shots of your house etc. Security guards of certain buildings have requested that I stop. So just stop and walk away.
    I agree, especially business location, shops with special design theme certainly do not like people taking pic, the owners may think you are trying to copy the concept. If you don't own the property, you have to follow the owner/lessor rules if you are allowed to enter, if not, it will be tresspass of rights.

    so shoot from outside!

  19. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by fantom
    Correct me if I am wrong...saw in the Newspaper some time back abt the subject of photography in the streets.
    A lawyer was quoted as saying that it's alright to shoot...but if the person you are shooting tells you to stop..then you should..and if you continue shooting him/her...the person has the right to ask you to delete the photos or handover the roll of film as the photographer has contravened the rights of personal privacy..or something to this effect.
    Now shooting inside and/or within a building open to the public is not similar to shooting in a public place..and the owner and/or his authorised reps(security personnel, Management staff) can stop one from taking fotos within their boundaries.
    hope this clears some matters pertaining to "street photography"
    i dun know about inside shopping malls. But AFAIK, there's no such thing as privacy in a public street. Can u stop someone from looking at u?

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cash
    i dun know about inside shopping malls. But AFAIK, there's no such thing as privacy in a public street. Can u stop someone from looking at u?
    No of cos not, but you can stop them if they are harassing you.

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