Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 25

Thread: photo stitching

  1. #1

    Default photo stitching

    i have used 10 photos for this exercise. canon photostitch vs photoshop cs2 (photomerge).

    i cant understand why the results are so different.

    canon results - used 10/10 photos. 2 domes not merged properly + can see the difference in contrast.



    photoshop - any stitcher's nightmare. horrible diagonal seams and distorted. used 7/10 photos.



    any stitching whiz out there to explain the results? also how do you achieve best results? which other softwares give better results?
    Last edited by pokiemon; 24th March 2010 at 05:26 AM.

  2. #2

    Default Re: photo stitching

    Use PTGUI.

    Did you should using tripod?

    Quote Originally Posted by pokiemon View Post
    i have used 10 photos for this exercise. canon photostitch vs photoshop cs2 (photomerge).

    i cant understand why the results are so different.

    canon results - used 10/10 photos. 2 domes not merged properly + can see the difference in contrast.



    photoshop - any stitcher's nightmare. horrible diagonal seams and distorted. used 7/10 photos.



    any stitching whiz out there to explain the results? also how do you achieve best results? which other softwares give better results?

  3. #3
    Senior Member giantcanopy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    SG
    Posts
    6,232

    Default Re: photo stitching

    Hi pokiemon

    Adobe CS4 photomerge stitches much better. Alternatively u can try out Kolar's Autopano Pro. They have a newer version but i bought the older one ( which i use when photomerge gives irregularities in stitch ). Both works well and attempts to corrects for any uneven color cast.

    As for stitching, always try to shoot stabilised to reduce any irregularities in frame.
    For wide lenses remember to allow more areas of overlap as the software corrects distortion individually leading to large areas of gap. to shoot with the best results, u can try a shift lens, or shoot ard the nodal point. nowadays i hardly go ard the nodal point but i simply rotate ard the ballhead works pretty well as well especially on tele lenses.

    here is one example of a shot done with just rotating ard the ballhead with a 135mm, 3 shots. in this case ps photomerge did a pretty good job.

    http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4038/...d7eef9f3_o.jpg

    ryan

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    3,911

    Default Re: photo stitching

    CS2 really wasn't very good with compositing. Adobe majorly tweaked the CS3 engine and it does a fabulous job time and time again. They didn't tweak the photomerge function for CS4, so those two should be on a par, but there IS a big step up between CS2 and CS3.

  5. #5

    Default Re: photo stitching

    thanks for your inputs guys.

    no tripod was used. basically i stood at the same pivotal point and rotated 180 degrees with each frame at 75% of the previous one.

    question - assuming the sun was to my left and my pictures (taken from left to right) get progressively under-exposed, will the stitching software adjust for the different exposure i.e after the stitching, you cant tell difference in exposure/levels between seams) or do i have to pp each picture to ensure the exposure/levels is consisent across the pictures before stitching? also in this case what camera mode will you use i.e. auto mode (and leave the adjustments to the camera) or manual mode to compensate manually for the difference in exposure?

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    3,911

    Default Re: photo stitching

    Most will make small changes, usually to account for lens vignetting, etc. You really need to shoot in manual to give the software the best chance though. Manual everything, in fact - focus, wb, exposure.

  7. #7

    Default Re: photo stitching

    don't know about cs4, but cs2 was horrible.

    i use ptgui these days. very good stitching, if you make sure that everything is level with a spirit level, it will stitch seamlessly. for vertoramas, also does it fine, as long as you don't veer too off. this works for 10mm as well.

    of course the most accurate way is to use a designated panorama head to do it. but i think the spirit level method works reasonably fine for me so far, so i'll just use that. basically i have a spirit level on the tripod legs, make sure that is level, and then make sure the head's level is level too, and then you can just happily rotate around. this is with a pan tilt head.
    Last edited by night86mare; 24th March 2010 at 11:09 PM.

  8. #8

    Default Re: photo stitching

    Quote Originally Posted by pinkjerry2010 View Post
    So great! I admire what U made . They seems real !
    _____________________
    Print koozies | Koozie printing
    i think you are blind.

  9. #9

    Default Re: photo stitching

    Quote Originally Posted by night86mare View Post
    i think you are blind.
    oooi. dont be rude to my fan.

  10. #10

    Default Re: photo stitching

    Quote Originally Posted by pokiemon View Post
    oooi. dont be rude to my fan.
    you ah..........

    i mean, maybe the first photo if a bit old, got lao hua yan, can forgive.

    the second one got all the happy slashes in the photo..............

  11. #11
    Deregistered allenleonhart's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    3,656
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default Re: photo stitching

    Quote Originally Posted by night86mare View Post
    i think you are blind.
    LOL i second this. why do u need a blind fan btw.

    beauty is in the eye of the beholder. if u are blind u dunno beauty

  12. #12

    Default Re: photo stitching

    Quote Originally Posted by Jed View Post
    Most will make small changes, usually to account for lens vignetting, etc. You really need to shoot in manual to give the software the best chance though. Manual everything, in fact - focus, wb, exposure.
    Quote Originally Posted by night86mare View Post
    don't know about cs4, but cs2 was horrible.

    i use ptgui these days. very good stitching, if you make sure that everything is level with a spirit level, it will stitch seamlessly. for vertoramas, also does it fine, as long as you don't veer too off. this works for 10mm as well.

    of course the most accurate way is to use a designated panorama head to do it. but i think the spirit level method works reasonably fine for me so far, so i'll just use that. basically i have a spirit level on the tripod legs, make sure that is level, and then make sure the head's level is level too, and then you can just happily rotate around. this is with a pan tilt head.
    thanks jed & nightmare.

    goodbye cs2 hello cs4/ptgui!

  13. #13
    Deregistered allenleonhart's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    3,656
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default Re: photo stitching

    Quote Originally Posted by pokiemon View Post
    thanks for your inputs guys.

    no tripod was used. basically i stood at the same pivotal point and rotated 180 degrees with each frame at 75% of the previous one.

    question - assuming the sun was to my left and my pictures (taken from left to right) get progressively under-exposed, will the stitching software adjust for the different exposure i.e after the stitching, you cant tell difference in exposure/levels between seams) or do i have to pp each picture to ensure the exposure/levels is consisent across the pictures before stitching? also in this case what camera mode will you use i.e. auto mode (and leave the adjustments to the camera) or manual mode to compensate manually for the difference in exposure?
    well. adobe cs4 and 3 and 1 and 2 all i used before. bought them all to try out photostitch

    1 and 2 sucked the most.

    3 and 4 takes into account not only exposure, but the focal length of the lens.

    and if u dun use a tripod u basically committed suicide.

    even if i fly to tw i still bring a trusty tripod. and i still shoot panaromas

  14. #14

    Default Re: photo stitching

    Quote Originally Posted by allenleonhart View Post

    and if u dun use a tripod u basically committed suicide.

    even if i fly to tw i still bring a trusty tripod. and i still shoot panaromas
    not really... if you're using a ballhead without a level, you might as well shoot handheld.

    i just shot a few handheld panos recently, they worked out fine. just needed a wee bit of massaging with liquify in cs2 afterward.

    as to why, firstly, my big tripod is still back in london, so whatever tripod i would have used was a ballhead without a level. next, there was a ledge which made it hard to have the tripod stable, etc. so the best way was to shoot propped up on the ledge handheld.

    this is not to say that you should just go around shooting panos without a tripod and spirit level. the best way is to do that, of course.. but that doesn't mean that you can't get a good pano without any tripod whatsoever. you just need to put in more work after that, and risk not getting a proper one out of the box at all.
    Last edited by night86mare; 24th March 2010 at 11:26 PM.

  15. #15

    Default Re: photo stitching

    btw, pokiemon, that is really a very apt scene for a panorama. looks great, especially if you have frames including the top of the two spires.

    if you manage to stitch it well, let us see the result! i know i would like to see it.

  16. #16
    Deregistered allenleonhart's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    3,656
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default Re: photo stitching

    Quote Originally Posted by night86mare View Post
    not really... if you're using a ballhead without a level, you might as well shoot handheld.

    i just shot a few handheld panos recently, they worked out fine. just needed a wee bit of massaging with liquify in cs2 afterward.

    as to why, firstly, my big tripod is still back in london, so whatever tripod i would have used was a ballhead without a level. next, there was a ledge which made it hard to have the tripod stable, etc. so the best way was to shoot propped up on the ledge handheld.

    this is not to say that you should just go around shooting panos without a tripod and spirit level. the best way is to do that, of course.. but that doesn't mean that you can't get a good pano without any tripod whatsoever. you just need to put in more work after that, and risk not getting a proper one out of the box at all.
    LOL did i mention mine wasnt a ballhead? i'm those one plane pan one:P

    x:y coordinates anyone?

  17. #17
    Deregistered allenleonhart's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    3,656
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default Re: photo stitching

    oh yes. take note when u merge, after tat u must adjust to compensate the lens distortion. its very significant.

  18. #18

    Default Re: photo stitching

    Quote Originally Posted by allenleonhart View Post
    LOL did i mention mine wasnt a ballhead? i'm those one plane pan one:P

    x:y coordinates anyone?
    same thing, if you are adjusting a pan tilt head on tilted legs, you will not get optimal stitching results!

  19. #19
    Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Singapore, Singapore, Singapor
    Posts
    454

    Default Re: photo stitching

    Here is how i will do my pano view....

    1.) Focus ur lens on the centre main object ~ half press shuttle
    2.) press the button which locks ur focus and exposure.
    3.) starting from the left to the right take multiple shots.. note: keep ur feets still try to be as level as possible.

    it is important to lock ur focus and exposure. if not ur pano view will have different colours esp. the sky...
    http://www.EdmundPhoto.com
    for Weddings, Family Portraits, Executive Portraits, etc

  20. #20

    Default Re: photo stitching

    Quote Originally Posted by night86mare View Post
    i think you are blind.
    Enjoy talking to a spam bot?

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •