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Thread: How to identify sweet spots?

  1. #1
    Member Deloi's Avatar
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    Default How to identify sweet spots?

    Hi guys,

    I have just bought my first ever DLSR and been practicing with it since day 1 of its birth. Most of the time i am not satisfied with the pictures taken. I know there's a lot to consider for such results like more practice, more research and studies, better equipments, etc.

    I've been doing my research and i noted one of the consideration to improve shots is to identify you lens sweet spot. So how do u exactly identify such?

    please help.
    Canon 550D / 18 - 135mm IS / 50mm f1.8 II

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    Default Re: How to identify sweet spots?

    it is usually 2-3 light stops down

    put your cam on a tripod, shoot at different aperture. Crop 100% and see which is the sharpest

  3. #3
    Member Deloi's Avatar
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    Default Re: How to identify sweet spots?

    Quote Originally Posted by Fireemblem View Post
    it is usually 2-3 light stops down
    light stops? care to elaborate sir?


    Quote Originally Posted by Fireemblem View Post
    put your cam on a tripod, shoot at different aperture. Crop 100% and see which is the sharpest
    so basically, the most important thing to consider for sweet spots is the aperture?
    Canon 550D / 18 - 135mm IS / 50mm f1.8 II

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    Default Re: How to identify sweet spots?

    Yes basically your aperture controlls the light stop

    Example Lens biggest aperture = 2.8. 2/3 light stop downs means 5.6/8.0 respectively

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    Member Deloi's Avatar
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    Default Re: How to identify sweet spots?

    got it sir! thanks alot... now i need a tripod.hehe. thanks again!
    Canon 550D / 18 - 135mm IS / 50mm f1.8 II

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    Default Re: How to identify sweet spots?

    Quote Originally Posted by Deloi View Post
    ...
    so basically, the most important thing to consider for sweet spots is the aperture?
    No. Obviously the centre of your image will be the "sweet spot" compared to the corners...

    On most lenses (most good lenses anyways) however, the corners can be just as sharp as the centre at ~ f/8 provided that everything is in focus.

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    Senior Member Kit's Avatar
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    Default Re: How to identify sweet spots?

    Quote Originally Posted by Deloi View Post
    Hi guys,

    I have just bought my first ever DLSR and been practicing with it since day 1 of its birth. Most of the time i am not satisfied with the pictures taken. I know there's a lot to consider for such results like more practice, more research and studies, better equipments, etc.

    I've been doing my research and i noted one of the consideration to improve shots is to identify you lens sweet spot. So how do u exactly identify such?

    please help.
    Its more beneficial for you to find out what is it exactly that you are not satisfied with and how you can improve on it. For all you know, your problem might not even be related to the lenses you use. A sweet spot can only be a guide and it means absolutely nothing if the aperture that gives you the sweetest spot is not the aperture you want to use for taking photos. Choosing the right aperture for your photos is more than just identifying the sweet spot.

  8. #8

    Default Re: How to identify sweet spots?

    The least of your worries is equipment nor a lens' 'sweet spot' at the moment.

    Assuming no prior foundation nor experience, your best bet in improving in photography is the learn about LIGHT, then EXPOSURE and finally 'HOW A DSLR WORKS'.

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    Member driveanegg's Avatar
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    Default Re: How to identify sweet spots?

    I dont think sweet spots are the problems ....

    Personally in order of importance ...
    1. Exposure - ISO / shutter speed / aperture
    2. How a dSLR works
    3. Composition
    4. Composition
    5. Composition
    6-10. Composition .....

    Why not post some pictures and describe what you are not satisfied with ???

    Keep shooting !!!
    I probably collect lenses more than I take pictures
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/33270154@N03/

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    Member Deloi's Avatar
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    Default Re: How to identify sweet spots?

    haha. i know i need a lot to consider and still alot to learn... maybe sweet spots is the least of my concern... but i just thought i need to know.haha.

    Thanks for the tips guys!

    btw, great pics on flckr driveanegg!hehe. your a good job!hehe.

    i'll try to post pics some other day. i dont know how yet.haha.

    for those who still want to comment on the pics taken so far please see http://deloi.tumblr.com/

    note that i am so noob so if you dont have a cool head as of the moment, dont mind to visit the site.hahaha. also i dont have much pics yet.
    Canon 550D / 18 - 135mm IS / 50mm f1.8 II

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    Member driveanegg's Avatar
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    Default Re: How to identify sweet spots?

    Quote Originally Posted by Deloi View Post
    btw, great pics on flckr driveanegg!
    thanks for the compliment... not good lah still learning...
    I probably collect lenses more than I take pictures
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/33270154@N03/

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    Moderator ed9119's Avatar
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    Default Re: How to identify sweet spots?

    Quote Originally Posted by Kit View Post
    Its more beneficial for you to find out what is it exactly that you are not satisfied with and how you can improve on it. For all you know, your problem might not even be related to the lenses you use. A sweet spot can only be a guide and it means absolutely nothing if the aperture that gives you the sweetest spot is not the aperture you want to use for taking photos. Choosing the right aperture for your photos is more than just identifying the sweet spot.


    a sweet spot's (or rather its size) is more important on the club-face of a golf club.
    shaddap and just shoot .... up close
    Walkeast

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    Default Re: How to identify sweet spots?

    Quote Originally Posted by ed9119 View Post


    a sweet spot's (or rather its size) is more important on the club-face of a golf club.
    Use the lens to hit the golf ball and hear nice thud??
    Nikon D90 | 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 | 55-200mm f/4-5.6 | 35mm f/1.8G | 50mm f/1.8D

  14. #14

    Default Re: How to identify sweet spots?

    Shoot more, review more..

  15. #15

    Default Re: How to identify sweet spots?

    put your lens out for a while... observe where the ants go... that should be the sweet spot.
    Why so serious... Son?

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    Senior Member giantcanopy's Avatar
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    Default Re: How to identify sweet spots?

    Quote Originally Posted by Deloi View Post
    Hi guys,

    I've been doing my research and i noted one of the consideration to improve shots is to identify you lens sweet spot. So how do u exactly identify such?
    u'd probably shoot at all different apertures and compare 100% and see which appears sharper (but with the know how not to confuse shallow depth of field of large aperture vs deeper dof with smaller apertures ). But as many others mentioned, it is an exercise of futility when most of us shoot according to what aperture we need. Oftentimes, the widest available aperture might not be the technical optimum, but it might be what is necessary for the shot.

    ryan

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    Senior Member Numnumball's Avatar
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    Default Re: How to identify sweet spots?

    Quote Originally Posted by Deloi View Post
    Hi guys,

    I have just bought my first ever DLSR and been practicing with it since day 1 of its birth. Most of the time i am not satisfied with the pictures taken. I know there's a lot to consider for such results like more practice, more research and studies, better equipments, etc.

    I've been doing my research and i noted one of the consideration to improve shots is to identify you lens sweet spot. So how do u exactly identify such?

    please help.
    Usually 2 full-stops down from ur max aperture size. Shoot more and with practice it will be more of an instinct thing..
    I turned PRO in diaper chg!
    My Flickr|My Son

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    Default Re: How to identify sweet spots?

    The sweet spot... Is using the right aperture for the job :P

    Its no use if you find out your lens' "sweet spot" is at f/8 and you insist on using it when when you should really be using for a particular shot is a larger aperture for a narrower depth of focus.

    One of the fastest way to improve is to get critique on your photos which forumers here have plenty to dispense so start posting up and you'll see improvements fast.

  19. #19
    Member Deloi's Avatar
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    Default Re: How to identify sweet spots?

    thanks for all the responses guys! it helps a lot.

    i'll try to post some pics at the critic corner next time.
    Canon 550D / 18 - 135mm IS / 50mm f1.8 II

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