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Thread: Colour calibrating monitor and printer

  1. #1
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    Default Colour calibrating monitor and printer

    Hi,

    Wanted to find out how to colour calibrate the monitor and printer so that when I print out a photo, the colour matches what I see on my monitor. If anybody knows how, I'd appreciate any advise.

    Thanks...

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by otnaicus
    Hi,

    Wanted to find out how to colour calibrate the monitor and printer so that when I print out a photo, the colour matches what I see on my monitor. If anybody knows how, I'd appreciate any advise.

    Thanks...
    you will need to spend some money.. at least $2k if you are using the EFI/GretagMacbeth equipment. I am not sure about others though.

    you will need the spectrometer (aka UVcut if using GM) to measure the colors.

    To calibrate monitor:
    1. the calibration is based on the standard white plate on the cradle.
    2. scan the images/colors produced on screen and a icc profile will be created.
    3. use that profile as the defualt profile for the monitor.

    To calibrate printer:
    1. the calibration is based on the standard white plate on the cradle.
    2. the software will prompt you to print 4 pages of colors/tones approx 900+ tones in all. print out on different kinds of papers which you will use for printing.
    3. scan the printouts
    4. color profiles will be created for different prints on different papers.
    5. use the repective profiles created for different papers (i.e. if you are going to print on photo paper, use the photo paper profile) when you are editing the picture with Adobe Photoshop or other color space aware softwares (e.g. Quak)

    at this point, the colors in the monitor will be as close to what will be printed. Note that that the color will be very very very very very very close, but still, may not be 100% accurate.

    Hope the above helps.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by hangyong
    you will need to spend some money.. at least $2k if you are using the EFI/GretagMacbeth equipment. I am not sure about others though.

    you will need the spectrometer (aka UVcut if using GM) to measure the colors.

    To calibrate monitor:
    1. the calibration is based on the standard white plate on the cradle.
    2. scan the images/colors produced on screen and a icc profile will be created.
    3. use that profile as the defualt profile for the monitor.

    To calibrate printer:
    1. the calibration is based on the standard white plate on the cradle.
    2. the software will prompt you to print 4 pages of colors/tones approx 900+ tones in all. print out on different kinds of papers which you will use for printing.
    3. scan the printouts
    4. color profiles will be created for different prints on different papers.
    5. use the repective profiles created for different papers (i.e. if you are going to print on photo paper, use the photo paper profile) when you are editing the picture with Adobe Photoshop or other color space aware softwares (e.g. Quak)

    at this point, the colors in the monitor will be as close to what will be printed. Note that that the color will be very very very very very very close, but still, may not be 100% accurate.

    Hope the above helps.

    Thanks a lot... So need pieces of equipment together with some software?

  4. #4

    Default

    To do a proper calibration of your monitor and printer you would need both hardware and software. If you just want to calibrate your monitor, the cheapest hardware/software kit is about $300 for Spyder to $500+ for Eye-One. To calibrate both printer and monitor, the kit required would set you back at least $1,000+ to >$2,000 depending on brands. Check with Cathay Photo for more details on costs and specifications of the kits. They seem to have a good range of products for this purpose.

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