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Thread: What does it take to become a photographer?

  1. #41

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    Quote Originally Posted by SniperD
    I'm a newbie then...
    ya right!
    you can buy better gear but you can't buy a better eye

  2. #42

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ian
    Simple, here we have a case of: 3 professionals (Jed, rueyloon, myself) who have replied, 1 part-timer (sion), 1 wannabee (sniperD) and the rest are unknowns, but highly likely to be amateurs judging by their answers. This is a fairly typical mix here on CS.

    Do a search of the site (keywords something like professional and photographer) and you'll find quite a few threads dealing with the reality of being a working professional, as opposed to some spotty or not so spotty kid who picks up a couple of low rent jobs now and then.

    As the saying goes, professional photography is a cruel mistress, it calls many yet few are chosen.
    Yes, and? What is your point? You did not explain anything? Pro? Big deal. You started shooting like anyone else who picked up a camera and released the shutter. There may be many amatures here who can be pros but maybe they chose not to.

  3. #43

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    Quote Originally Posted by zaren
    amateur photographer here...

    ordinariless... pls take what i say with a pinch of salt!
    What you said earlier on was indeed very inspiring, but i will take it with a pinch of salt. Don't worry.

  4. #44

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    Quote Originally Posted by SniperD
    I guess all of us have to start somewhere
    I can't agree more..

    it only makes sense that one has to pass through stages of a newbie or beginner to become a professional.

  5. #45

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    Quote Originally Posted by Minoxman
    Yes, and? What is your point? You did not explain anything? Pro? Big deal. You started shooting like anyone else who picked up a camera and released the shutter. There may be many amatures here who can be pros but maybe they chose not to.
    cool down brother...Hehe, take everything u read with a pinch of salt jus like zaren asked me to


  6. #46
    Senior Member
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    Perth Australia
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    2,548

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Minoxman
    Yes, and? What is your point? You did not explain anything? Pro? Big deal. You started shooting like anyone else who picked up a camera and released the shutter. There may be many amatures here who can be pros but maybe they chose not to.
    Minoxman,

    Before you start tossing the c*ap around I'd suggest you go and READ the second post in this thread, which as it happens was:


    Quote Originally Posted by Ian
    Paper qualifications and certification are not required, providing you can demonstrate the competency required by the agency. Having a qualification doesn't demonstrate competency, it merely demonstrates that you managed to pass the required examinations.

    With that said, for a youngster trying to break in to the industry some qualifications do help.
    So you've got a beef with what I posted do you? I can't see why as it's the plain unadulterated truth.

    Yeah so what I'm a pro, I've only been a pro for a quarter of a century and know nothing I guess, especially about what it takes to start in this industry, about the relevance of qualifcations for various fields in photography.

    Instead let me ask you, what relevant experience do you have in professional photography as I'll bow to ANYONE who really knows what they are doing and so far I've yet to see a single valid contribution by you in this thread.

    Have a nice day,
    Ian
    Last edited by Ian; 15th March 2004 at 05:24 AM.
    The Ang Moh from Hell
    Professional Photography - many are called, few are chosen!

  7. #47

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ian
    Minoxman,

    Before you start tossing the c*ap around I'd suggest you go and READ the second post in this thread, which as it happens was:



    So you've got a beef with what I posted do you? I can't see why as it's the plain unadulterated truth.

    Yeah so what I'm a pro, I've only been a pro for a quarter of a century and know nothing I guess, especially about what it takes to start in this industry, about the relevance of qualifcations for various fields in photography.

    Instead let me ask you, what relevant experience do you have in professional photography as I'll bow to ANYONE who really knows what they are doing and so far I've yet to see a single valid contribution by you in this thread.

    Have a nice day,
    Ian
    Although we have noththing to contribute, at least we tried to give some. You? You just thik because you are a pro for 25 years, you can talk like some mighty and bringing some of us amatuers down. I have seen more humble pros than you, that us for sure. Knowing a lot about how to get into the industry means nothing with condescending attitudes like yours. Go read your previous posts and learn to be more humble.


    Please take my post with triple pinches of salt, I know nothing afterall.

  8. #48

    Cool Luck = Preparation + Opportunity + PR

    Quote Originally Posted by rueyloon View Post
    alot of it is about talent and luck and PR skills,

    PR skills can get you anywhere

    Luck is just about increasing your odds, just get your name around, and be around more

    Talent is probably the most important, but it you don't do well in the first 2, it's going to be a long and hard journey

    missed out the most important stuff........... anyone can build a good career in photography, but what will make you stand out is PASSION.

    cheers
    rgs
    rueyloon
    Friends have always said the same thing to me over and over "You are so lucky." To them it appears that I am always successful in the things I set out to do. All is good as long they don't think luck follows me everywhere. I've had my share of misfortunes but counting the times I did well in my ventures, I narrow LUCK down to being PREPARED when an OPPORTUNITY comes. Good PR skills give you a lot of mileage in anything you do whether it's convincing your parents to give you extra money or your boss to give you a promotion or more relevant to this forum, your clients to let you shoot instead of their usual photographer.

    On being PREPARED. Do you homework, research, talk to lots of people in the industry .. IGNORANCE IS NOT BLISS! Build a portfolio of your best work, you may have to do freebie work to gain experience. Remember, Experience cannot be bought, only earned (unlike Certificates). Breaking into a new venture is hard work ... like breaking in a new engine, manufacturers give specific instructions for the first 5,000 KMs. I don't think many have such patience yet having patience is a virtue in everything you do!

    On OPPORTUNITY. As you gather market intelligence and socialize with the right people, you'll realise the babysteps that you have taken to come this far start to pay off ... having a starter portfolio, you continue to build more to "WOW" your clients. Persistence and patience is really key here .. you've heard this before, good things come to those who wait, but not wait and do nothing!

    I got into photography completely by accident. I had bought an EOS 300D and had not planned on becoming a professional but a number of positive incidents took place that pushed me into it overnight. I had very little prior photography experience and operating a DSLR was daunting enough on its own. I had just resigned from a 13 year IT profession and wanted to pursue my online distribution business but got distracted instead by what photography offers. I had a lot of free time to learn the 300D (part of the getting PREPARED learning exercise) and went out shooting all the colorful events we have here. Then I submitted four of my best work to a Tourism Photo Contest, out of 400 entries, one of my entries won 9th spot and it was the first time I entered a photo contest. Naturally the feel good factor was high at the time and it was inspiring to be among those who are seasoned pro and non-pro photographers. The Awards presentation was honoured by The Patron of the Brunei Photography Society, HRH Prince Sufri Bolkiah and among those attended were Ambassadors and High Commissioners from diplomatic missions as well as Government Ministers. It's at events like this that you network your way in and up of the business.

    Luck followed and during the televised wedding of the Crown Prince, I was spotted by the Chairman of a huge department store chain who also happens to be the bestowed leader of the Chinese community here. He's an elderly gentleman who enjoys taking photos as much as being photographed and insists that I join him in visiting the other districts during the ceremonious wedding showcase. I've been with him ever since .. long story and so much to tell but I'll leave that for a more appropriate discussion.

    p.s. One very effective way method of reaching your audience is have your work showcased on a website. If you cannot afford your own personal webpage there are plenty today that are free so there's really no excuse. Once your images are online, the next time would be to write that killer proposal. I carefully chose "kill" as I see it appropriate in this context .. an unconvincing proposal would effectively kill your OPPORTUNITY while a good one kills the competition. This is often easier said than done but it's all about perseverance to succeed.
    Last edited by janshim; 27th December 2006 at 04:12 PM.

  9. #49
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    1,537

    Default Re: What does it take to become a photographer?

    I wonder how the threadstarter and the pros are doing now since 2004 till now....

  10. #50
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    Singapore, East Coast, Katong.
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    Default Re: What does it take to become a photographer?

    hmmm.... to me: passion, dedication, and personal space.

    As a photographer, one must know what he wants and what he sees in a picture. It doesn't matter whether one is pro or not, whether by profession or trade, whether by camera make or model, whether by race or gender, as long one has his own style and that flair of expression that is consistent throughout his/her photos, he/she should be recognised as one who controls and captures the moment, a true photographer at that extent. There's something so magical about getting that moment in time, and to me, this is what fuels my passion as a photographer. No matter what age (I'm 15, btw), one must be focused on that vision he/she wants sees in his/her work.

    Pro or non-pro, it is not important. I feel that being a pro (not a freelancer) limits your personal space/development in your photos, where you have to consistently tailor your tastes to suit the client. Unless you are really a "Pro Pro" of course, where you have pioneered a style of photography that people like so much and are queuing up to buy them.

    Ian,
    It always amazes me that so many amateur photographers think they know what it takes to be a professional photographer and how to break in to the industry ...
    this quote, I find, there's nothing to be amazed about. If people out there who think they know what it takes to be in the industry, let them be. Photography, as well as the industry, is all about making mistakes, and taking chances as well. Let it be part and parcel of the learning process of the photographer.

    And in case you all didn't know, this thread has drifted to: "What does it take to become a PRO photographer", which is quite off-thread.

    Photography to me, should hold no restrictions, classes, or boundaries, and to draw classes at them is a very inappropriate thing to do. Unless someone out there would like to clarify why he/she does so, I would assume this in my case.

  11. #51

    Default Re: What does it take to become a photographer?

    the amazing thread

  12. #52

    Default Re: What does it take to become a photographer?

    if you really want to do it then start by assisting pros. read up and learn and gain attention and find people willing to pay for your work. if its your passion, give it a whirl.

    if you don't belive in yourself even a little, then don't try. there are tons of shutterbugs willing to do photoshoots for free. its a competitive industry which pays little to most.

  13. #53

    Default Re: What does it take to become a photographer?

    paper qualification may not be a necessity...but it may help u understand your photography better.... u dun really hav to hav a photogy cert...a design cert or something may do the same thing..

    cheers!

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