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Thread: Anyone here bold enuff to do this: Quit job to do something u enjoy?

  1. #1

    Default Anyone here bold enuff to do this: Quit job to do something u enjoy?

    Juz hope to hear some comments/opinions:

    Supposed you've been working for a few years now and currently have also taken up a part-time degree course. Obviously, time is precious and limited. You feel tired of your job now (mundane, sometimes long hours) but have some savings already.

    Would you quit your job so that you are free to concentrate on your studies which you desire to do well? Or stay on but feel somewhat miserable given the limited time, less energy to concentrate and always rushing around?

    What are the pros and cons you'd consider?

  2. #2
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    I graduated with a BA in International Relations, and was about to embark on a career as a full-time photographer. Bold enough for you? Too bad the job market opened another door for me, and i took it.

    In any case, whatever you finally decide on...don't ever look back.

  3. #3

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    Fall in love with what you do, and not the money.

  4. #4

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    I just did that, and today was my last day at work.. will probably miss the financial benefits that comes with work... but I just went for it..

    helps if you're young and adventurous heheee

  5. #5
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    Hang on gentlemen. Both of you left your jobs to go do another job. This is leaving your job to *study*. In between study and turning that study into an occupation, a lot of things can happen like losing your interest in that course of study and career path.

    Before jumping into it you need to ask yourself. Is your education seriously, seriously suffering as a result of your work? How long have you been studying this course and are you fairly sure you're going to keep enjoying it later on?

    Remember that for every person who posts here who quit their job to go into full time photography (or whatever), there are plenty who decided not to. Remember that every individual's consequences are different, so think carefully about advice that doesn't take your personal circumstances into account.

    Ultimately there's no "right" decision. Just because 1 or 20 people post to say they've done something doesn't make it "right". But it is a decision you will have to live by. So it's a decision you should make carefully and in full possession of as much information as possible so you can make an educated decision.

    To be fair you are asking the right questions, it's just that so far no one's answered them aside from to say, I did something similar so you should too, without really elaborating.

  6. #6

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    Jed is right...a lot of things can happen no matter at which point you're in... I guess you really have to ask yourself the questions, stick and commit to whatever you believe in and then go for it Be prepared to face the consequences of your decision though cos it might be tough..

    I left a very very cushy job, just to study something which I've not even yet gotten a place yet .. will only know in May whether I get it, but prior to that you've got the tests and interviews to prepare for.. I've made that decision with some apprehension, but will not look back, cos that's something I want to do and am prepared to do whatever it takes to do it

    Hope this helps

  7. #7

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    Thank Jed for the further clarification... Yes, I'm referring to studies here after quitting your job... or anything else that gives you little or no income, like doing volunteer work for 1-2 years overseas, taking a much needed 1 year off from work to back-pack etc.

    Don't worry.. I fully respect everyone's experience and it doesn't mean I'll naturally follow suit. The urge inside is very high. You could say it's a form of burnt out for me in my job. It's stable but something I feel is putting me down in several areas. For example, I used to go for simple physical exercises after work. These days, studies take up most of my time and my work can be tiring. (I might work on weekends too with little compensation.) No time to go snapping too. If I quit, I'll have more time for things I enjoy doing and I can also read a lot more comfortably. It's so demoralizing (unhealthy!) to think I can't even take a nice stroll in the park these days without worrying about the time!

    I love my studies and I'm confident of springing back in one way or another after graduation. I've decent savings, not much but can see me thru. At worst, I'll pick up some simple tuition for pocket $$$.

    Wow... realize this is a tough decision to make. I'm 75% certain but think me parents will sort of freak out! I find it's difficult to do such things out of the norm...

    Opinions/experiences please?

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by melly
    Jed is right...a lot of things can happen no matter at which point you're in... I guess you really have to ask yourself the questions, stick and commit to whatever you believe in and then go for it Be prepared to face the consequences of your decision though cos it might be tough..

    I left a very very cushy job, just to study something which I've not even yet gotten a place yet .. will only know in May whether I get it, but prior to that you've got the tests and interviews to prepare for.. I've made that decision with some apprehension, but will not look back, cos that's something I want to do and am prepared to do whatever it takes to do it

    Hope this helps

    Wow Melly... that's very encouraging! Ahhh, so you quit to want to study too. I think I identify a lot with you. I feel there's only this one life. If I forego doing what I really enjoy, then perhaps it's never and regrets later. Thanks.

  9. #9

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    if you want to do something, just do it fast before more liabilities pile up.

  10. #10

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    Same problem here...worried that it may not work out and that I may regret....worried that I may disapppoint my parents....worried about the what ifs, maybes, and buts etc etc etc.

    On the other hand, I figured if I ever want to do it, now's prob the best time since like, not so old yet so if it doesn't work out, at least still marketable?
    Last edited by TRiShnDaisy; 11th March 2004 at 09:36 AM.

  11. #11
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    If your current job isn't what you can see yourself doing for the next 20 years or so as a career, then get out and do something you both enjoy and can earn a living in. If studying is the way to get there, then i suppose you have to do what you have to do... especially if you're still young and all, no great loss to your shelf-life. Anyway, it's never too late to get out of something you detest, no matter how comfortably you are tied-down by the salary or whatever...

    Go do something you enjoy and feel fulfilled doing, something in which you know you can achieve something and carve yourself out a special place that belongs just to you. Of course, you'll have to balance that with being able to earn something to cover your daily expenses and your commitments to family and all that. Just don't get stuck 20 years from now looking back with regrets.

  12. #12

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    Hi Veronica, just for sharing, I have done what you are contemplating. Quit bec. was burnt out, and took up a course which I had wanted to do.

    Pros: you'll enjoy the course better, get better results? (I did), have more time for yourself, feel less drained and stressed, have time to smell the roses, travel if possible, etc.

    Cons: money issue (definitely need to have savings to tide over), peer pressure and pressure from parents, relatives who usually don't take kindly to this sort of thing, and will either pity you (can't get job ah?), or think you're lazy, or stupid, or silly to quit working without a job (I think some readers here will probably feel the same ).

    The other thing to think about if you intend to get back to working life later is - those companies which I called "unenlighted" will also question why you quit without a job during job interviews, simply bec. it's not quite the culture here for ppl to take a break from their job unless there are reasons which they consider compelling (e.g. take care of children). In western countries, I understand that some companies do value your experience if say, one takes time-off to travel and gain other experiences.

    It would be helpful if you have skills to eventually fall back on when you do return to working life (unless you're rich enough to not work for the rest of your life!). That way, you don't have to worry about not being able to get a job later. And yes, I did go back to work since I can't afford to not work.

  13. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by Minoxman
    Fall in love with what you do, and not the money.

    Looking at the current crisis, the number of interviews I went, and the time taken for me to get a job, I choose not to believe that myth anymore.

  14. #14
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    Fall in love with what you do, and not the money.
    What I love to do is to not doing anything. But then how do I have money to survive. ???

  15. #15

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    Thanks all, esp ghibli and tingchiyen, for your views and feedback.

    ghibli, yesss.... I totally identify what you're saying. Don't mind me asking... How long was your course?

    I think the pressure from society and culture here is indeed a big factor, since in Asian families, we tend to live with our parents and it's sometimes hard to ignore. I hate to be viewed as "bumming" around or "jobless". I read once this MIT grad who did street performing for some time after graduation because he didn't want to miss out doing what he enjoyed! And yes, I think to have more time to study means better grades too which is what I eally want.

    I guess it's my part now to really consider hard what my intentions really are...

  16. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by ghibli
    The other thing to think about if you intend to get back to working life later is - those companies which I called "unenlighted" will also question why you quit without a job during job interviews, simply bec. it's not quite the culture here for ppl to take a break from their job unless there are reasons which they consider compelling (e.g. take care of children). In western countries, I understand that some companies do value your experience if say, one takes time-off to travel and gain other experiences.
    its very true this one,
    I was in an Audit job when I first graduated in 1998, after 1 year, decided to call it quit and look for something else to do, so being very young and with what the heck attitute then, i quit without a job,
    of course when for lots of interviews thereafter and from the first 20 plus interview i went and which i told them the truth ie. didn't like nature of Audit, wanna take a break etc, I was never offered a Job.... so took up a contract one and landed in my current one after that......

    the typical HR people who scan your resume will usually look for break in between job and would want you to account for the gap, it seems like Singapore employer will attached stigma to u if u would just say take a break and enjoy life......
    the good thing is studying is always a good legitimate reason provided its not too long a break also

    on burnt out, after working for 6-7 years most of my peers including myself are pretty burnt out and most are feeling what Veronica is feeling rite now.....
    frankly i was dying for a break as well, would have done so already if not for the fact i had a family and 2 kid to support so can't do without $$ for long....
    so sad hor, life is S'pore is like work, work work and more work.....

    the alternative to taking long break to recharge is to have some short breaks every year, i try to make it a point to go somewhere near to holiday with my wife once a year, go sentosa also good, slow down and unwind a bit, it feel good really.......

  17. #17
    Senior Member The_Cheat's Avatar
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    For me, I guess I'm just lucky enough to do something that I'd really enjoyed. So don't think I'll face with this dilemma!

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by mysonlovenemo
    its very true this one,
    I was in an Audit job when I first graduated in 1998, after 1 year, decided to call it quit and look for something else to do, so being very young and with what the heck attitute then, i quit without a job,
    of course when for lots of interviews thereafter and from the first 20 plus interview i went and which i told them the truth ie. didn't like nature of Audit, wanna take a break etc, I was never offered a Job.... so took up a contract one and landed in my current one after that......

    the typical HR people who scan your resume will usually look for break in between job and would want you to account for the gap, it seems like Singapore employer will attached stigma to u if u would just say take a break and enjoy life......
    the good thing is studying is always a good legitimate reason provided its not too long a break also

    on burnt out, after working for 6-7 years most of my peers including myself are pretty burnt out and most are feeling what Veronica is feeling rite now.....
    frankly i was dying for a break as well, would have done so already if not for the fact i had a family and 2 kid to support so can't do without $$ for long....
    so sad hor, life is S'pore is like work, work work and more work.....

    the alternative to taking long break to recharge is to have some short breaks every year, i try to make it a point to go somewhere near to holiday with my wife once a year, go sentosa also good, slow down and unwind a bit, it feel good really.......
    I'm totally agreed with you. It's not as easy for anyone to just give up everything and do what you wanted to do, you have to give your family a thought ... especially when your son or daughter start smiling at you when you reach home after work.. I'm also thinking of give up my current job and wanted to do what I wanted to do, yeah.. yeah.. said is always easier then do. .
    But.. if you are S.A.A. then I don't think there is a problem at all. Always try something bold when you are eligible.

    *S.A.A = single and available.

  19. #19

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    Yeah, I sometimes wonder if that's how my life is going to be. Just work till I get too old/ sick/ die accidentally?
    I wonder how my parents do it. If I'm complaining after only working for 3+ years, what about them?
    I wonder if it's only me cos apparently some of my friends are pretty content with their lot. They don't have issues like that to grapple with.
    I wonder.
    I wonder.
    I wonder.
    One of my favourite songs, "Maryland" by Vonda Shepard.
    You guys must be wondering, 'Boy, does this girl have issues.'
    Last edited by TRiShnDaisy; 11th March 2004 at 02:03 PM.

  20. #20

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    I think the prob with local employers is that unless you're someone with a degree or experience that allows you to do project based jobs (paid per project) they don't take kindly to you quitting your job, be it to rest, to take a holiday or watever. I think the reason is simple: they spend a while training you up for the job before you can really do your work, if you're the sort to quit cuz you don't like the work etc, then they are taking a risk in taking you on. unless you do project based stuff then its fine.

    but I think to take a break to study is a valid reason, provided the stuff you study is deemed worthwhile in your new employer's eyes. eg. if you quit to do MBA full time vs quit to take dip in photography full time. so there's still the prob there.

    I agree with Jed in that you should maybe really see if your job affects your studies a lot? if not then, is it really worth quiting simply to free up time to do whatever else you had wanted to do but had no time to do? if you hate your job, but it doesn't affect your studies that much, and freeing up your time isn't that impt compared to getting your monthly pay then I suggest you work and study, save as much as you can meanwhile, finish studying, then quit your job, take your savings, play as much as you want till you're recharged, look for another job which you have more interest in.

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