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Thread: Help in choosing Uni course..

  1. #1
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    Default Help in choosing Uni course..

    Hi there,
    Ive just completed my A levels and now in a sick dillema with what course to take up in the Uni.

    My cousin told me that its unclear which way Singapore wants to go in the future, so he advised me to go with my 'heart and passion'.. Well, how true is that?

    I am contemplating taking the following...
    1) NTU Info and Comms Studies
    2) NUS FASS -- taking Comms too, though i have not decided on other courses i may want to take in the first year. In FASS, i heard that students must take a variety of programmes before they major/specialise in one, is it true?
    3) NUS BizAD
    4) NTU Biz.

    So its something like a Comms vs Biz kind of thing for me.. I have no experience in this stuff obviously, and i don't really have a close friend who can help me on this..

    Can anyone here in CS can help me out? I would like to think of the competing criteria for what i choose eventually as..
    1) Demand in Singapore
    2) Job prospect
    3) 'expandibility' = would have i be stuck in the same form of work for the rest of my life?

    I know some of my questions may seem goofy to the experienced.. Hopefully someone will help me out.. Im sure there are others in the same shoes as me.

    Thanks...!

  2. #2

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    Quote Originally Posted by Wryer
    Hi there,
    Ive just completed my A levels and now in a sick dillema with what course to take up in the Uni.

    My cousin told me that its unclear which way Singapore wants to go in the future, so he advised me to go with my 'heart and passion'.. Well, how true is that?

    I am contemplating taking the following...
    1) NTU Info and Comms Studies
    2) NUS FASS -- taking Comms too, though i have not decided on other courses i may want to take in the first year. In FASS, i heard that students must take a variety of programmes before they major/specialise in one, is it true?
    3) NUS BizAD
    4) NTU Biz.

    So its something like a Comms vs Biz kind of thing for me.. I have no experience in this stuff obviously, and i don't really have a close friend who can help me on this..

    Can anyone here in CS can help me out? I would like to think of the competing criteria for what i choose eventually as..
    1) Demand in Singapore
    2) Job prospect
    3) 'expandibility' = would have i be stuck in the same form of work for the rest of my life?

    I know some of my questions may seem goofy to the experienced.. Hopefully someone will help me out.. Im sure there are others in the same shoes as me.

    Thanks...!
    If i may ask, what are your grades?

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by innovas1
    If i may ask, what are your grades?
    Yup sure.
    Not exactly great results...
    AAC13, for Geog, Econs, Maths, MT, GP respectively.

    Do i even qualify for the courses list?

  4. #4

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    Admission Talks at NTU 13 March
    http://www.ntu.edu.sg/oad/home/admtalk_march2004.htm


    From http://www.ntu.edu.sg/OAD/Local+Admi...ns/default.htm

    Communication and Information

    Can communication studies students take minors? If so, in what subjects areas?
    Yes, you can. The possible areas are (1) drama and performance, (2) English, (3) history, (4) literature in English, and (5) Chinese. [Read our handbook, information about modules/A.U.s is in there.]

    All you need to do is to register for the courses. If you can't complete all 16 A.U.s, then you won't receive a minor in communication studies. However, the subjects you have taken will still be counted as your general electives.

    How much money can I earn with an SCI degree?
    It depends on whether you're self-employed (i.e. free lance or start your own business), work for the government, or private industries. The starting salary can vary from very low to very high -- $1,200 to above $3,000.

    What can I do with an SCI degree?
    Journalists, producers, PR executives, advertising executives, corporate communication, civil service, researchers, consultants etc.

    Is it very difficult to get into your program? How many applicants were there in the past and how many actually got in?
    It is very competitive. We had about 1,000 or more applicants for the undergraduate program, and only about 10-15% were successful. We have increased from an intake of 90 to 170. This represents almost 90% increase over the years.

    I am very interested, but I am not sure if I can make it. What is your advice?
    If you have reasonably good A-level results, put SCI as first choice on your application. If you put something that is easier to get in (e.g. NUS' Arts and Social Science) before SCI, and if they accept you, then your application will not even reach SCI.

    I am very interested in your course, but I don't think I can get in at all. What are your suggestions?
    For some students whose results are slightly below the mark, we will interview them to see if they have some qualities suitable for the programme.

    You have three other options:

    Apply to other NTU programs, and take SCI subjects as electives;
    Finish your bachelor's degree elsewhere and apply to do post-graduate work with us later; and
    If finances permit, you can go overseas.

    What is the cut-off point to enter your program? What about in the past? What were the cut-off points to enter your program in previous years? What are your students' A-level results?
    We do not know the exact cut-off point for this year because every cohort is different. It is a joint-admission exercise and the computer sorts out candidates based on their results. If you have Bs in your A-level results, you have a reasonable chance.

    I heard that there is a minimum GP score. What is it? Why do you have to use GP?
    GP score of 4 or better. We need something to gauge students' language ability and interest in current affairs.

    Are there any specific subjects that I need?
    No. We have students from the science, arts, and commerce streams.

    How is your program different from the polytechnics'? I heard that both the university and the polytechnics are teaching the same thing. I also heard that polytechnic graduates are more employable and hands-on.
    We have a better balance in terms of theories and technical skills. Polytechnics are mostly skills-oriented. We have very good students who are typically more mature, intelligent, and hardworking. Therefore, professors can push them to do a lot more, and they are able to motivate and compete among themselves to achieve high standards. In addition, 90% of our faculty members have PhDs. A university degree is better regarded than a polytechnic diploma.

  5. #5
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    go for heart and passion..
    listen to the gov means digging your own grave!
    Confidence is thinking you'll be Champions, arrogance is stating it.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by mervlam
    Yup, going next week.

    Thanks for the added info.

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by Wryer
    Yup, going next week.

    Thanks for the added info.
    glad to help

    do clear your doubts there!
    Last edited by mervlam; 8th March 2004 at 05:17 PM.

  8. #8

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    Hi,

    Well you are blessed to be able to study. That in itself is a great thing!!

    The last thing you want to do is to study something that you think is going to cushion you against economic fallout, unemployment, cyclical industrial supply and demand etc.

    From what you have written, seems like you are quite keen to go into business management or communication studies. I say you go for it. Because at the end of the day, whatever course you take now, the most important thing is that you like the subjects you are studying, and that you give it your best shot! i.e. study hard, put in 100%. Worry about tommorrow when it comes.

  9. #9

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    last time rumours said engineers can get higher pay..
    then i forgo my interest in arts.

    I wanted to do Literature in JC and then go on to further it at UNi, but i didn't. Now, my english deterioriated... No jobs for engineers. Paywise, my frens who took accts got 1-1.5k greater than my salary. haiz..
    Go for your interest, so u will not regret it later.

  10. #10
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    Oh i see, seems like the consensus is that i go for my interest..

    Thanks dudes!! I knew i could count on CS members to help me in some way or another.

    Other comments?

  11. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by Wryer
    My cousin told me that its unclear which way Singapore wants to go in the future, so he advised me to go with my 'heart and passion'.. Well, how true is that?
    Well...I am not sure if I got it in the right order...first we needed doctors, then there were too many doctors, then we needed lawyers, then too many lawyers, then it's business, then engineers, now I think it's scientists/phds/creative people. knowledge workers in the knowledge era.

    The future is not so predictable and even the government at best does maybe-very-good-but-still guesswork. So you may be better off going with your 'heart and passion'. If you love what you do and become very good in what you do, there will be prospects/demand for it.

    As for your question on "'expandibility' = would have i be stuck in the same form of work for the rest of my life?"
    University is not the destination of your education. The key is life-long/continuous learning and adaptability. Then you would not be stuck. Life long employability and not life long employment.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by berryhappy
    Well...I am not sure if I got it in the right order...first we needed doctors, then there were too many doctors, then we needed lawyers, then too many lawyers, then it's business, then engineers, now I think it's scientists/phds/creative people. knowledge workers in the knowledge era.

    The future is not so predictable and even the government at best does maybe-very-good-but-still guesswork. So you may be better off going with your 'heart and passion'. If you love what you do and become very good in what you do, there will be prospects/demand for it.

    As for your question on "'expandibility' = would have i be stuck in the same form of work for the rest of my life?"
    University is not the destination of your education. The key is life-long/continuous learning and adaptability. Then you would not be stuck. Life long employability and not life long employment.
    Yup, i agree with you.
    I am quite unsure about the future path of Singapore, or the emphasis the country is going to major upon.

    I guess, its continuous upgrading to make myself 'life long employability'.
    Thanks!

    Now..Im wondering if i can get in those schools with my results.
    Anyone in the sch/fac can gimme a agaration?

    thanks!!

  13. #13
    Senior Member Kit's Avatar
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    I think you'de better ask what you want to be in future instead og what Singapore wants to be in future. Trends in occupations are just passing fads, nothing will last forever. Its in your best interest to pursue something that you're truly passionate about.

  14. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by Wryer
    Yup, i agree with you.
    I am quite unsure about the future path of Singapore, or the emphasis the country is going to major upon.

    I guess, its continuous upgrading to make myself 'life long employability'.
    Thanks!

    Now..Im wondering if i can get in those schools with my results.
    Anyone in the sch/fac can gimme a agaration?

    thanks!!
    Business can... SCI is very, very competitive (as the FAQ section says)

    Anyway you can do a Business as Major with Comm Studies as Minor and even the other way round...

  15. #15

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    [QUOTE=Wryer]
    I am quite unsure about the future path of Singapore, or the emphasis the country is going to major upon.
    [QUOTE]

    It will keep changing because this little country has to respond to global shifts.

  16. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by fruitybix
    Hi,

    Well you are blessed to be able to study. That in itself is a great thing!!

    The last thing you want to do is to study something that you think is going to cushion you against economic fallout, unemployment, cyclical industrial supply and demand etc.

    From what you have written, seems like you are quite keen to go into business management or communication studies. I say you go for it. Because at the end of the day, whatever course you take now, the most important thing is that you like the subjects you are studying, and that you give it your best shot! i.e. study hard, put in 100%. Worry about tommorrow when it comes.
    agree totally

    quote something i just saw recently from one of those mail my brother sent ........,


    >Business Times
    >Published October 11, 2003
    >Young, successful - and in search of a dream
    >
    >By DANIEL BUENAS
    >
    >UNHAPPY - that's how I feel as a young Singaporean.
    >
    >I feel this way not because I'm jobless, poor or uneducated. In
    >fact, I
    >have a good job, a stable income and a good education. By most
    >standards,
    >I should be considered a successful young man.
    >
    >However, I am slowly realising that the achievements I have been
    >chasing
    >are, perhaps, a chimera. I have sought and yearned for success, when
    >perhaps what I should have been looking for was happiness, or
    >meaning in life.
    >
    >This is the dilemma that the youth in Singapore face - we cannot
    >reconcile
    >our apparent success with our gnawing dissatisfaction with life, and
    >nobody
    >can tell us why.
    >
    >What we suffer from is a crisis of the soul.
    >
    >Young Singaporeans are getting lost in a world in which our worth as
    >human
    >beings is tied to our material, social and physical successes.
    >
    >However, as we look behind these successes, we often find the faded
    >vestiges of what once were our dreams. Thus, our life's purpose has
    >been
    >drowned in the ocean of practicality.
    >
    >This distinction between success and happiness was brought home to
    >me
    >recently after the death of a friend. He had passed on suddenly and
    >in the
    >prime of his life, and his death shook me from the stupor of endless
    >days
    >of work.
    >
    >I realised that I had perhaps neglected my family and friends around
    >me
    >and,in so doing, had lost the true meaning of life.
    >
    >It is too late now, but if I could speak to my friend one last time,
    >I
    >wouldn't say anything. Instead, I would listen to what he had to
    >say.
    >
    >Why?
    >
    >Because Singaporeans are too busy rushing to work, rushing from work
    >and
    >rushing at work. We don't take the time to listen to others.
    >
    >His death made me reflect on my own life, and the search for
    >happiness.
    >Sadly, the need to find meaning in life wasn't one of the things I
    >learnt
    >at school. The need for success, however, was.
    >
    >The desire for success is ingrained in our national psyche, and has
    >been
    >pursued with a fervour that equals - and often surpasses - religious
    >zeal.
    >
    >From young, we are streamed, labelled and forced into educational
    >moulds,emerging as world-class products of our world-class education
    >system. We graduate equipped to be successful in life.
    >
    >Yet, I feel that in some way, we are lacking. I was never taught to
    >pursue
    >my dreams. Instead, I was taught to be practical. I chose my field
    >of
    >study, computer science, and my university based on practical
    >considerations.
    >I thought this would eventually lead to success. But success doesn't
    >always
    >translate into happiness.
    >
    >Perhaps my idealism is brought about by a life that has not known
    >the
    >cruelty of war, or the bitter struggle for survival. Yet, I have met
    >those
    >who hold on to similar ideals, despite going through great
    >suffering.
    >
    >For instance, I recently interviewed a well-respected academic who
    >spoke at
    >length with me on the virtues of finding meaning and purpose in what
    >we do.
    >He was no stranger to suffering, having lived through the Japanese
    >occupation, the Communist revolution in China and nearly starving to
    >death
    >as a young boy. After so much hardship, one would expect him to
    >extol the
    >virtues of being practical.
    >
    >Instead, he spoke of passion, desire, purpose and happiness in what
    >we do.
    >I found it ironic that it took a senior citizen to point this out to
    >what he
    >called 'a handsome, energetic young man' (what I found even more
    >ironic was
    >his use of the word 'handsome').
    >
    >Singaporean youth need to learn that our lives are not just about
    >achieving
    >success and that we cannot rely on the government or society to
    >provide us
    >with the reason for our existence. If we do, we will surely come
    >away
    >disillusioned and disappointed.
    >
    >More than anything, Singaporean youth need to know that the beauty
    >of life
    >lies in fulfilling our own dreams - not someone else's - and that we
    >should
    >not fear pursuing them, whatever they may be. Therein lies our road
    >to
    >happiness.
    >
    >As Eleanor Roosevelt so eloquently put it: 'The future belongs to
    >those who
    >believe in the beauty of their dreams'.
    >
    >The writer is a BT journalist. He is 24.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by mervlam
    Business can... SCI is very, very competitive (as the FAQ section says)

    Anyway you can do a Business as Major with Comm Studies as Minor and even the other way round...
    Hmm Comms Studies as major and Biz as minor seems appealing to me.
    I really quite interested in the Journalism aspect though, as Kit suggests, i think it is sound advice that i go for interests for the long term.

    thanks to all help so far!
    looking forward to more.

  18. #18
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    Inspiring dude! Words of wisdom from a 24 yr old.

    We all wish to be free of the 'wait to rush, rush to wait' mentality, i know Singaporeans, especially youths of my age often faced with choice dillema; as much as we love to do what we love, sometimes i get slammed right through the ground when i think of doing something i want. I guess i have to accept the fact that not all can be successful in the society's eyes, but we have to be successful in our own eyes.

    Regards

  19. #19
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    Hi Wryer,

    Congratulations on making through the A levels... This marks the start of the many decisions you'd have to make as you go through the years of your life (the next would probably be whether or not you should powder your (ahem ) before going to sleep in your army bunk.

    My two cents worth to aid (hopefully) in your decision making processing:

    First, it appears that you did not do much 'science' courses @ the As and have left out 'science based' disciplines in your choices. That makes the decision making much easier. It essentially eliminates all science/engineering/comp studies/med/dentistry etc from your list of probable.

    Second, the only options open to you (at least from NUS) can be classified into professional degrees and general degrees. Professional being Law and Arkhi; General being BRE, Bus, and Arts. I would like to think of the professional faculties giving you a 'sort-of' definite path into the respective industry according to whatever you've been trained in. This has no bearings though on whatever you would like to enter THAT industry, leave after a few years or do a mid-career switch.

    The rest of the world can be regarded as general disciplines. General in the sense that having read a couple of sociology courses will not make you a sociologist, modules of economics not make you an economist (unlike that reading law makes you a blood sucking, major PITA ***yer ). General degrees typically allow you more flexibility and gives you a broad based typed training; its more for the process of getting an education rather than preparing you for a specific task in the end. Unfortunately, unlike in the US where a liberal arts degree is respected for its broad based approach to education, the lack of specificity in general degrees makes their graduates less sought after.

    Having said the above, if you're looking for a general education, think of the disciplines that would interest you (it doesn't matter if you realised it doesn't interest you anymore when you're reading it cuz you can always switch/drop/quit after a year). Think of the industries that you may like to enter after you graduate, and decide on the disciplines that may give you a general training in that direction.

    If you're looking for professional degrees, that its a misnomer. But bear in mind that its your life; education no doubt is an expensive investment, but you may be one who is fortunate enough to switch to something else that you like.

    Hope the above helped...

  20. #20

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    There is NUS open house too this sat
    Maybe u can take a look, I would think there are some talks as well...
    If you happen to see me I am tourguiding :P

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