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Thread: Anybody can give me pointers on microphotography?

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    Senior Member The_Cheat's Avatar
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    Default Anybody can give me pointers on microphotography?

    Hi! Am just trying my luck here...

    I'm wondering whether anyone have experience with operating microphotography system, i.e. camera units on microscopes. If so, can anyone give me any pointers in taking clear and precise photos? I'm been fiddling around the system in my laboratories for more than half a year, and have yet to produce any outstanding photos. The specimens most often than not seems out of focus and the colour is err... funny!?

    So anyone can tell me the basics in microphotography?

    p.s. I'm not asking for pointers on taking macro shots here!

  2. #2

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    Quote Originally Posted by cheatchu79
    Hi! Am just trying my luck here...

    I'm wondering whether anyone have experience with operating microphotography system, i.e. camera units on microscopes. If so, can anyone give me any pointers in taking clear and precise photos? I'm been fiddling around the system in my laboratories for more than half a year, and have yet to produce any outstanding photos. The specimens most often than not seems out of focus and the colour is err... funny!?

    So anyone can tell me the basics in microphotography?

    p.s. I'm not asking for pointers on taking macro shots here!

    which microscopy system are you using? i use olympus, and olympus micro image allows you to tweak the levels, so you can get nice photos.

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    Senior Member The_Cheat's Avatar
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    I'm using an old model Olympus system... wait a moment while I dig out which model it is...
    Okay! It's a Olympus BHS313, with a macro lens 50mm f3.5, 35mm camera attachment, as well as a photomicrography system attached to the camera that allow settings for exposure and ISO. Slide film used is Fuji Sensia 400.

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    Quote Originally Posted by cheatchu79
    I'm using an old model Olympus system... wait a moment while I dig out which model it is...
    Okay! It's a Olympus BHS313, with a macro lens 50mm f3.5, 35mm camera attachment, as well as a photomicrography system attached to the camera that allow settings for exposure and ISO. Slide film used is Fuji Sensia 400.
    how do you focus? do you check with the viewfinder of the camera? what camera? i think the light used in the microscope isn't daylight balanced. need to filter to correct temp?

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    Senior Member The_Cheat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by leonzhu
    how do you focus? do you check with the viewfinder of the camera? what camera? i think the light used in the microscope isn't daylight balanced. need to filter to correct temp?
    Focus by adjusting the microscope. It's a compound stage microscope, where the macro lens is fixed at the focal distance, so what you see is literally what you get (well, the colour still doesn't turn out right...)

    The viewfinder is attached to the mounting of the lens, and not on the camera itself. There's a dial to set temperature, but me knowing next to nothing about photography, was "advised" not to play around with the dial!

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by cheatchu79
    Focus by adjusting the microscope. It's a compound stage microscope, where the macro lens is fixed at the focal distance, so what you see is literally what you get (well, the colour still doesn't turn out right...)

    The viewfinder is attached to the mounting of the lens, and not on the camera itself. There's a dial to set temperature, but me knowing next to nothing about photography, was "advised" not to play around with the dial!
    Focus: ensure your eyepiece compensation is +0. then focus until sharp. then your camera SHOULD be sharp, assuming your lens is still well calibrated.

    if you can, adjust the temp of the light to as close to 6500Kelvins as possible.

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    Senior Member The_Cheat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by leonzhu
    Focus: ensure your eyepiece compensation is +0. then focus until sharp. then your camera SHOULD be sharp, assuming your lens is still well calibrated.

    if you can, adjust the temp of the light to as close to 6500Kelvins as possible.
    Hey thanks for the pointers. Will try it out on my specimens when I can find time! Thanks again!

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