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Thread: How well did UV filters fare to cut UV

  1. #1

    Default How well did UV filters fare to cut UV

    I gotten a simple UV detector (only agregates ABC) and decide to see how well each camera filter fare. Hoya HMC UV, Polarizing filter, my spectacles, plain lens scores the best. Follow by no brand gradual ND. My coffee pot is the worst.
    Meter with and without filter under the sun.


    Coffee maker glass pot - no protection
    Coffee maker pot with 3 inch water - 25%
    Clear plastic container - 25%
    Hoya Skylight filter - no protection.
    Hoya Pro Clear Filter - 25%
    Hoya HMC UV - 100% *
    Sigma UV filter -25%
    Tiffen, Vitacon UV - 25%
    Polarizing Filter - 90% at least
    Transition spectacle lense - 100% *
    Non transition seiko plastic spectacle - 100% *
    85mm lens end without filter (with light beam at meter) - 100% *
    China made gradual ND dark end - >75%
    China made gradual ND clear end - 50%

  2. #2

    Default Re: How well did UV filters fare to cut UV

    hmm not sure if this is related but I've heard that UV has no significant effect on DSLR sensors and the images?
    Capture your memories, for they are not forever.

  3. #3

    Default Re: How well did UV filters fare to cut UV

    This is interesting, is yours the one used in spectacle shops to test whether sunglasses really got UV protection?

  4. #4

    Default Re: How well did UV filters fare to cut UV

    Not sure but it is those orange/black color handheld meter. Never seen what the optical shops are using.

    Quote Originally Posted by Timolol View Post
    This is interesting, is yours the one used in spectacle shops to test whether sunglasses really got UV protection?

  5. #5

    Default Re: How well did UV filters fare to cut UV

    UV filter was popular in film days as strong UV will cause hazy. Today it is more for protection of lens. People who has gone to snowy mountain will be able to give accurate account.

    If you look at the figures again, the thick lens alone is 100% protection, so sensor is not at risk. This is expected as UV do not have strong penetration. But I am surprised the branded ones (except hoya) offers little protection.

    Quote Originally Posted by Aimevous View Post
    hmm not sure if this is related but I've heard that UV has no significant effect on DSLR sensors and the images?

  6. #6
    Moderator Octarine's Avatar
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    Default Re: How well did UV filters fare to cut UV

    Quote Originally Posted by spheredome View Post
    But I am surprised the branded ones (except hoya) offers little protection.
    I guess it's a matter of transition characteristics when coming from UV to visible light. As mentioned in some tests it seems that in order to prevent any cut off in visible spectrum (hence, losing fractions of f-stops) some companies shift the transition zone between 'block' and 'pass through' into the range of UV. Together with the lens it still gives a high rate of UV blocking.
    But interesting that a Skylight filter doesn't block any UV. Since it's a warming filter it should filter blue portions of the light spectrum - which is just next to UV. Also good to see that 3 inches of water only block 25% of UV - a good reminder that even when snorkeling there is a strong need for UV protection. Got my legs heavily burnt once.
    EOS

  7. #7

    Default Re: How well did UV filters fare to cut UV

    On the skylight filter, I give it a no because the reading hovers between 0-25% (e.g 2 w/o, 1.5 w filter) inconsistently which I give it as non. But your explanation of color material should block some UV is true as tint water reduce UV penetration. Polarizer has a percular result of alternating at a constant rate between (0-0.5) consistently.

    Oh yes, clear shallow water offer little protect under strong sun, which in fact worst bec of reflection which intensify.

    Quote Originally Posted by Octarine View Post
    I guess it's a matter of transition characteristics when coming from UV to visible light. As mentioned in some tests it seems that in order to prevent any cut off in visible spectrum (hence, losing fractions of f-stops) some companies shift the transition zone between 'block' and 'pass through' into the range of UV. Together with the lens it still gives a high rate of UV blocking.
    But interesting that a Skylight filter doesn't block any UV. Since it's a warming filter it should filter blue portions of the light spectrum - which is just next to UV. Also good to see that 3 inches of water only block 25% of UV - a good reminder that even when snorkeling there is a strong need for UV protection. Got my legs heavily burnt once.

  8. #8
    Moderator Octarine's Avatar
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    Default Re: How well did UV filters fare to cut UV

    Quote Originally Posted by spheredome View Post
    On the skylight filter, I give it a no because the reading hovers between 0-25% (e.g 2 w/o, 1.5 w filter) inconsistently which I give it as non. But your explanation of color material should block some UV is true as tint water reduce UV penetration. Polarizer has a percular result of alternating at a constant rate between (0-0.5) consistently
    Just found something about UV transmission of lenses: http://www.lenstip.com/index.php?art=123
    They also measure the UV transmission when reviewing the lens. Result should be quite obvious.
    EOS

  9. #9

    Default Re: How well did UV filters fare to cut UV

    Further reading revealed that majority of the digital sensors are not good at capturing UV spectrum instead of IR. In fact does UV serves any purpose in the outcome of the standard digital photo?

    We see camera body with IR blocker in front of sensor but not UV blocker.

    Quote Originally Posted by Octarine View Post
    Just found something about UV transmission of lenses: http://www.lenstip.com/index.php?art=123
    They also measure the UV transmission when reviewing the lens. Result should be quite obvious.

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