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Thread: Shoot alot on a dSLR

  1. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by tomshen
    Then even a newbie can claim a 90% keeper rate coz everyone's expectation varies.
    Never doubt the Myth. Words of wisdom.

  2. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ah Pao
    And your point being?
    Don't bother about the keeper rate. If my keeper rate is 10% and all these 10% are solid works, I still can be a good photographer. Don't forget most pros SHOOT MORE AND SHOW LESS. There is simply no myth in this regard.

  3. #43

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    I shot a wedding (my first and prob last one) last week. About 1000 shots. The official photog raised his eyebrows at the way I was banging away. Ask Tom - he shot with me once, and expressed surprise at my machine gun style.

    My keeper rate is about 1 in 50. I like being able to choose between similar versions of the same shot for the best one - sometimes the eyes are closed, sometimes the smile is crooked, sometimes the hand covers the face momentarily.

  4. #44
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    i favour machine gun style sometimes for event shooting, but 1 in 50 really a bit too much. A lot of time wasted in editing. Even panning practice gets better hit rate. Maybe 1 in 5 would be more 'reasonable'?

    Quote Originally Posted by StreetShooter
    I shot a wedding (my first and prob last one) last week. About 1000 shots. The official photog raised his eyebrows at the way I was banging away. Ask Tom - he shot with me once, and expressed surprise at my machine gun style.

    My keeper rate is about 1 in 50. I like being able to choose between similar versions of the same shot for the best one - sometimes the eyes are closed, sometimes the smile is crooked, sometimes the hand covers the face momentarily.

  5. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by StreetShooter
    I shot a wedding (my first and prob last one) last week. About 1000 shots. The official photog raised his eyebrows at the way I was banging away. Ask Tom - he shot with me once, and expressed surprise at my machine gun style.

    My keeper rate is about 1 in 50. I like being able to choose between similar versions of the same shot for the best one - sometimes the eyes are closed, sometimes the smile is crooked, sometimes the hand covers the face momentarily.
    LOL, yeah man! I still remember well. So you take wedding like street candid huh? Actually I even heard people use 1D/D2H at 8fps for portraiture (of course it was for fun only).

    In every photographer's life, if given a DSLR (free pics), he/she may abuse it. But sooner or later, self-displine will be developed. I still miss the days when I shot like crazy.

  6. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by ST1100
    i favour machine gun style sometimes for event shooting, but 1 in 50 really a bit too much. A lot of time wasted in editing. Even panning practice gets better hit rate. Maybe 1 in 5 would be more 'reasonable'?
    Maybe those are really MEANINGFUL. A sharp and well composed/exposed pic may not be a keeper to someone like Streetshooter.

  7. #47
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    Ah, when you throw 'MEANINGFUL' into the selection criteria, the hit rate drops like mad.

  8. #48

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ian
    SS Yep I am .. ie: a minimum of 70% shots that are good enough for publication assuming all of your good shots were published.

    Keeper rates to aim for:

    Sports: 70-90% (it gets easier with the years and varies with the sport)
    Weddings: 80-90%
    Commercial Product: 85-95%
    Street: 80%
    Wildlife: 50%
    Astrophotography: 10% (even that's hard unless it's the moon or bright planets)
    Macro (still life) 80-90%
    Macro (moving beasties) 40-50%
    Sunrises/Sunsets: 80%
    Landscapes: 90%
    Architectural exteriors: 80%
    Architectural interiors: 80%

    These are pretty hard or even unrealistic targets to be achieved for most of us, but I might be wrong. Do u shoot at Continous mode while shooting sports?

  9. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by SMC
    These are pretty hard or even unrealistic targets to be achieved for most of us, but I might be wrong. Do u shoot at Continous mode while shooting sports?
    They are neither hard nor unrealistic targets to obtain, but it does mean you need to really apply yourself and be brutally honest with your own shooting, learn from mistakes and strive to achieve the highest possible outcomes for each shot.

    Continious mode High Speed, but I seldom fire more than a single shot in most sports unless something spectacular is occuring (eg: car crash).
    The Ang Moh from Hell
    Professional Photography - many are called, few are chosen!

  10. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by tomshen
    Don't bother about the keeper rate. If my keeper rate is 10% and all these 10% are solid works, I still can be a good photographer. Don't forget most pros SHOOT MORE AND SHOW LESS. There is simply no myth in this regard.
    Ha.. Great!
    Anyone watched the movies "war photographer"?
    basically this guy is just "snap snap snap" non stop in the heat of events with his 2 eos 1v and 24-70L. Some more he is shooting film.
    for a shoot he in indonesia i think he easily exceeded the 300+ shots the thread starter mentioned.
    But what was shown on wall after the dark room is like less than 10 shots?
    one example of pro war photographer of SHOOT MORE AND SHOW LESS?

    But i can imagine shooting that much in b&w, if it is color negative printing, walao the cost must be siao.

  11. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ah Pao
    And your point being?

    I think he meant that an amateur may claim 70% keeper rate but that is vastly different in terms of quality (the amateur's 70% keeper rate) from a pro's 70% keeper rate. The shots that the pro perceives as worth keeping is of a different quality, different plane from an amateur. Now I'm referring to ordinary mortals (amateurs like me) and not highly skilled amateurs who happen not to be pros...

  12. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by StreetShooter
    I shot a wedding (my first and prob last one) last week. About 1000 shots. The official photog raised his eyebrows at the way I was banging away. Ask Tom - he shot with me once, and expressed surprise at my machine gun style.

    My keeper rate is about 1 in 50. I like being able to choose between similar versions of the same shot for the best one - sometimes the eyes are closed, sometimes the smile is crooked, sometimes the hand covers the face momentarily.
    "He BANGS! He BANGS!"


  13. #53

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ian
    Keeper rates to aim for:

    Street: 80%
    street 80% ? depends on what kind of street.. :P

    a photographer i admire (no he ain't even famous i think, but i like his works) once said

    "if you shoot a roll and you have 1 good shot out of 36, that's acceptable."

  14. #54

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    i don't see what's wrong with shooting 1000 and showing only 10.

    if those 10 shots are enough to make the person smile and smile for days

    the remaining 990 didn't go to waste.

    i agree with film costs are high and all that

    but shooting less doesn't mean shooting good.

    i have a dslr i shoot street and i think and compose before i raise the camera, but stuff don't always turn out like you want them to turn out...

    maybe i'm just lousy yeah.

  15. #55

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    Maybe some food for thought.
    I quote Michael Freeman in his book "The 35mm Handbook" (emphasis his),

    ---------------------------------
    In the end, of course, it is the creative skill that will normally make the difference between a shot that is adequate and one that is good, but being able to put yourself in the position to exercise that skill requires a talent for organisation. I remember one occasion, several years ago, whith one particular art director. We were both looking at a newly published book...for which I had taken a few shots. There was one excellent aerial picture, by another photographer...the light, the moment, the composition were all just right, and my reaction was one of professional envy. "Listen," the art director said, "It's no great thing. That was simply a matter of being in the right place at the right time. There was nothing else to the shot that was beyond any competent photographer." But this is not to diminsh the value of that ability to put onself in a precise place at a precise time; it is one of the great skills of photography.
    ---------------------------------

    Talking about being at the right place at the right time.

    Once a photographer has reached a certain level of technical competency, what makes a keeper from a thrower would be a marriage of creativity and luck. You can take 1000 shots or just 1 roll of film; sometimes if the circumstances are against you, there's nothing you can do. Conversely, if you're at the right place at the right time, there's no stopping you.

  16. #56

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    Quote Originally Posted by sehsuan
    "He BANGS! He BANGS!"

    Pulling a YSLee? Be careful, or you WILL get HUNG up to dry.

  17. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by StreetShooter
    Pulling a YSLee? Be careful, or you WILL get HUNG up to dry.
    no la, since when there was an association between YS and William Hung?

    the referral to the "he bangs" is your own text of "banging away"...

    just a joke ah, relak ok!

  18. #58
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    as much as the discussion here has supported the fact that the number of frame rates does not necessary equates to keepers.. the important thing is for the photographer to know how to identify the moment. Not blindly snap away and hope to get one out of 100.
    I agree with Ian on his post of keeper shot percentage as most professionals have achieved over the years but this again is subjective. NatGeo's photographers spent months on assignments and a few thousands of shots later, their best submitted work to be published.

    For beginners, it's okie to shoot more although it's more essential to learn the basis of composition and capturing the moment thru the finger-pressing on the shutter.

    Have fun snapping ^.^

  19. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by jasphotography
    oppsss, missed this.

    ya, this is the answer I wanted to know.... LCD on the camera to assess shutter counts. So, Kodak DSLR does have such feature ehhh... cool!
    6797 mine has

  20. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by cheechee
    Ha.. Great!
    Anyone watched the movies "war photographer"?
    basically this guy is just "snap snap snap" non stop in the heat of events with his 2 eos 1v and 24-70L. Some more he is shooting film.
    for a shoot he in indonesia i think he easily exceeded the 300+ shots the thread starter mentioned.
    But what was shown on wall after the dark room is like less than 10 shots?
    one example of pro war photographer of SHOOT MORE AND SHOW LESS?

    But i can imagine shooting that much in b&w, if it is color negative printing, walao the cost must be siao.
    Actually, it's a 1n or other pre-1V with a 17-35.

    Regards
    CK

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