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Thread: photography skill discussions

  1. #1
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    Default photography skill discussions

    hello i am deric here and i am new at clubsnap
    i would like to know how to take good photo shoots

    i just started photography not long ago. i would like to know what are the different between smaller aperture and bigger aperture?what is aperture use for?what aperture and shutter speed for night shots,low light,bright sunny day,dusk,overcast and etc..i tried searching for it from the libraries but still can't understand them sorry i a bit slow learner

  2. #2
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    Default Re: photography skill discussions

    which camera model is better to choose for? canon 50D? Sony A550,nikon models?
    any suggestions for any camera models that good for intermediate photography?

  3. #3
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    Default Re: photography skill discussions

    what kind of lenses are for landscapes/cityscapes,wildlife,insects,birds,plants,people?

    -zoom lens for?
    -telephoto lens for?
    -macro lens for?
    -prime lens for?
    -fish eye lens for?
    -wide angle lens for?

    i know i am kind of dumb but i just hope any pros out there can help me out thank in advance

  4. #4

    Default Re: photography skill discussions

    you may start experimenting base on this.

    Dark image o----------------------------> Bright
    Low iso (High Image quality) ---------------High iso (low image quality)
    High shutter speed (freeeze image) --------Low Shutter speed (high motion blur)
    High aperture (high depth of field) ---------Low aperture value (Shallow Depth of field)

    -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    To control depth of field

    Shallow dof o---------------------------> high dof
    Long Focal length of lens (85mm) ----------Short focal length of lens(18mm)
    Large sensor (5D is here) ------------------Small Sensor (Compact cameras belong here)
    Low aperture value (F1.8) -----------------High Aperture value (F8)
    Small distance to subject ------------------Great distance to subject.

    -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    5DMk2,400D,EOS3 50mm F1.4,28-75 F2.8,GRDIII 28mm F1.9
    www.flickr.com/jenson_goh

  5. #5

    Default Re: photography skill discussions

    There are 3 elements that are the major components in deciding how an image turns out. These three are aperture, shutter speed and ISO.

    Aperture refers to the opening of the lens. Simply put, its the hole in the lens that allows light through into the camera's sensor.

    Naturally, a larger a hole/aperture, the more light passes through, allowing the image to be brighter, ceteris paribus.
    Conversely, the smaller the hole/aperture, less light passes through, hence image would be darker.

    The aperture is also used to control something else. It is known as the Depth of Field (DOF). Depth of Field refers to the extent of the area in an image to be in focus.

    The relation between the aperture and the DOF is as such, the bigger the aperture, the less subjects in the image to be in focus.
    For instance, using a big aperture, focusing on a subject in the foreground will render the background blur.
    If a small aperture is used, then the background will become clearer.

    However, how do we go about classifying the sizes of the apertures? This is because at various focal length, different amount of light will hit the sensor. The same diameter of the aperture for a wide angle lens, will have more light hitting the sensor than a telephoto lens.

    To relate them, something called the F- number was created. This F-number enables an image to remain at the same exposure (provided the ISO and shutter speed remains unchanged), regardless of the focal length used. The F-number is calculated as such,

    F-number = focal length/ diameter of aperture.

    Examples of F-numbers are F1.2, 1.8, 5.6...
    If relating to the above formula, the smaller the F-number, the bigger the size of the aperture. You would do good to remember this.

  6. #6

    Default Re: photography skill discussions

    I think its very hard to continue such discussions because, words are in the end, just words. Photography is about photos, so learning from various photos would be better.For instance, depth of field. An image would reach the person so much faster than to explain what is shallow or deep DOF.

    I guess if you are unable to understand what is going on in books, than the next option for you would be to ask someone out to guide and explain every single component of making an exposure. For me, that's one of the faster ways to pick up basic photography.

  7. #7
    Deregistered wootsk's Avatar
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    Default Re: photography skill discussions

    It's like RPG game,
    First u find the quest (what you want to learn and shoot) --> This is where you are at now
    Then you do the quest (Try out different techinque of shooting, Just shoot even if you don't know what you are shooting, but try using manual first as it help understand the different between shutter and F-stop effect the best)
    If you are stuck, read the FAQ (Do research on unknown stuff)
    When you lvl up long enough, you will realised what type of hero you are, Intel, Agi or Str (Your style of shooting)
    Keep leveling up (Shoot more and more and you will realise your shooting will get better and better)

    Follow the RPG style and nothing will go wrong

  8. #8
    Deregistered wootsk's Avatar
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    Default Re: photography skill discussions

    Btw, skip the aperture part first and learn F-stop and Shutter speed. Until you learn about DOF, there isn't much of a need to learn aperture first as what you will see on the camera is F-stop. Btw you count the "amount of light" as stop.
    1. Learn how to hold your DSLR (if you are getting one), which way is the best to hold it so it is stable, no chicken wing etc.
    2. Learn how to get the correct exposure first.
    Layman term,
    Lower F-stop = more light
    Slower Shutter speed = more light

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  10. #10
    Deregistered wootsk's Avatar
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    Default Re: photography skill discussions

    Quote Originally Posted by tanwk4321 View Post
    what kind of lenses are for landscapes/cityscapes,wildlife,insects,birds,plants,people?

    -zoom lens for?
    -telephoto lens for?
    -macro lens for?
    -prime lens for?
    -fish eye lens for?
    -wide angle lens for?

    i know i am kind of dumb but i just hope any pros out there can help me out thank in advance
    Common lens mention by most people got 2 type
    Zoom lens --> Can zoom (example 17 - 50mm)
    Prime Lens --> Cannot zoom (example 50mm)

    Telephoto, fisheye, wide angle lens are range of how far or wide the lens is. Try this
    1. Do a L on ur left and and a inverse L on your right hand. cross them up so you get a small square hole. (About the size of a DSLR Lcd screen)
    2. Stretch you hand out with the hole and look into it, visualise that to be the 200mm (Super telephoto)
    3. pull back your hand with still the hole to near your chest level and look into the hole again. Visual it to be 75mm (telephoto)
    What you have done is a example of a DSLR lens zooming between 200 to 75mm (visualise a bit)

    Macro lens are lens with short focus distance, don't think you should try it until you know what you want to shoot.

  11. #11
    Moderator Octarine's Avatar
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    Default Re: photography skill discussions

    Quote Originally Posted by tanwk4321 View Post
    i just started photography not long ago. i would like to know what are the different between smaller aperture and bigger aperture?what is aperture use for?what aperture and shutter speed for night shots,low light,bright sunny day,dusk,overcast and etc..i tried searching for it from the libraries but still can't understand them sorry i a bit slow learner
    How about reading the sticky threads and Articles and Guides here?
    Photography Notes for Newbies - the very basics
    Guide to DSLR Photography - More than the basics, advanced guide including equipment and other topics
    Your camera manual - most manuals have a basic guide about the 3 main elements: ISO, shutter speed, aperture.
    Next let's bury your illusion that there are some standard settings. Depending in existing conditions, your available gear and the intended outcome (how the pic should like like) you will need to think and decide how to setup the camera. No camera has the ability to read your mind (maybe in 10..15 years) and even fancy stuffs like face recognition cannot replace your brainwork / homework. For the camera all light is just electronic charge at the sensor, only in your mind it makes sense as a picture.
    If you are a slow learner (nothing bad about that) then you can consider attending a basic photography course. Guided learning might be more beneficial.
    Happy reading, enjoy shooting
    EOS

  12. #12
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    Default Re: photography skill discussions

    Quote Originally Posted by tanwk4321 View Post
    which camera model is better to choose for? canon 50D? Sony A550,nikon models?
    any suggestions for any camera models that good for intermediate photography?
    No.
    All cameras produce decent images - provided you know how to use them. Apart from the big C and N you should have a look at Pentax, Sony and the other brands. Some have very good entry level models for lower prices than the comparable C and N models. For you as beginner it's all the same.
    EOS

  13. #13
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    Default Re: photography skill discussions

    Quote Originally Posted by tanwk4321 View Post
    what kind of lenses are for landscapes/cityscapes,wildlife,insects,birds,plants,people?
    Start with your kit lens (provided with the camera when you buy it) and go from there. First you need to learn the basics before you can make conscious and knowledgeable decisions about lenses (which can easily costs more than the camera body). Learn the basics of composition and focal length and once you know where the kit lens limits you then you know exactly what to get.
    EOS

  14. #14
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    Default Re: photography skill discussions

    buy a camera first, then your learning journey will start
    don't be afraid to make mistakes, everyone makes them

    with every mistake you made, just make sure that you learn something from it

  15. #15
    Senior Member ZerocoolAstra's Avatar
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    Default Re: photography skill discussions

    Quote Originally Posted by tanwk4321
    hello i am deric here and i am new at clubsnap
    i would like to know how to take good photo shoots

    i just started photography not long ago. i would like to know what are the different between smaller aperture and bigger aperture?what is aperture use for?what aperture and shutter speed for night shots,low light,bright sunny day,dusk,overcast and etc..i tried searching for it from the libraries but still can't understand them. Sorry i a bit slow learner
    Quote Originally Posted by tanwk4321
    which camera model is better to choose for? canon 50D? Sony A550,nikon models?
    any suggestions for any camera models that good for intermediate photography?
    Quote Originally Posted by tanwk4321
    what kind of lenses are for landscapes/cityscapes,wildlife,insects,birds,plants,people?

    -zoom lens for?
    -telephoto lens for?
    -macro lens for?
    -prime lens for?
    -fish eye lens for?
    -wide angle lens for?

    i know i am kind of dumb but i just hope any pros out there can help me out thank in advance
    You're asking for a lot of info here.
    Firstly, if you've read books from the library but still can't understand them, bearing in mind those books were written by photography experts, what makes you think you'll get more success with Clubsnap?
    Secondly, I managed to find many many books on photography at the libraries. By getting a bit of info here and there, and through the internet (clubsnap being a part of it), your mind should begin to compile the info into a knowledge pool. I'm sorry to be rude, but I don't think you've been trying hard enough to find the info at the libraries, as you so claim.
    From your posts, it sounds like you're waiting to be spoon-fed with info. Help yourself first, and I'll be more than glad to help you on your learning journey.
    Exploring! :)

  16. #16
    Senior Member ZerocoolAstra's Avatar
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    Default Re: photography skill discussions

    Quote Originally Posted by tanwk4321 View Post
    hello i am deric here and i am new at clubsnap
    i would like to know how to take good photo shoots

    i just started photography not long ago. i would like to know what are the different between smaller aperture and bigger aperture?what is aperture use for?what aperture and shutter speed for night shots,low light,bright sunny day,dusk,overcast and etc..i tried searching for it from the libraries but still can't understand them. sorry i a bit slow learner
    A simple search through the Newbies Forum would have led you to this thread (it's a Sticky)
    http://www.clubsnap.com/forums/showt...25#post3374325

    One of the pages about aperture
    Quote Originally Posted by sulhan

    ANY decent book on photography should have covered this topic. I willing to bet you $1000 that I can pop over to any National Library and find such a topic covered in any basic photography book.
    Last edited by ZerocoolAstra; 30th December 2009 at 10:05 AM.
    Exploring! :)

  17. #17

    Default Re: photography skill discussions

    Quote Originally Posted by Octarine View Post
    How about reading the sticky threads and Articles and Guides here?
    Photography Notes for Newbies - the very basics
    I've also started from reading this. It is very very useful.
    It is true to have a camera on hand to start. While reading you practicing, you will start to understand more.
    Last edited by Shen siung; 30th December 2009 at 10:18 AM.

  18. #18

    Default Re: photography skill discussions

    Quote Originally Posted by ZerocoolAstra View Post
    You're asking for a lot of info here.
    Firstly, if you've read books from the library but still can't understand them, bearing in mind those books were written by photography experts, what makes you think you'll get more success with Clubsnap?
    Secondly, I managed to find many many books on photography at the libraries. By getting a bit of info here and there, and through the internet (clubsnap being a part of it), your mind should begin to compile the info into a knowledge pool. I'm sorry to be rude, but I don't think you've been trying hard enough to find the info at the libraries, as you so claim.
    From your posts, it sounds like you're waiting to be spoon-fed with info. Help yourself first, and I'll be more than glad to help you on your learning journey.
    Agree with you here.

    TS, there are so many books out there in the library (so much more accessible with local libraries as well). There are also loads of info on youtube or just via a google search. The camera nowadays don't even need to take notes on settings and waste money for film development for reviewing.

    Its a big pond out there and the learning curve is very short nowadays. My advice to you :
    1. Do that google search and go to a local library to read a book or 2
    2. Shoot, shoot and shoot more. Its free! Don't be afraid to try different settings. Don't even bother to go outdoors to great locations. Do it in the comfort of you home if necessary. You will surprise yourself as you get more familiar with camera and lens and start to see improvement.

  19. #19

    Default Re: photography skill discussions

    The reason why you cannot grasp the concept is because you don't own or use dSLR/SLR, thus cannot imagine what is looks like. Get one basic-intermediate dSLR model + 2 lens and start learning from book. If you are a visual learner, getting the equipment is a must.

    Once you have mastered the PASM (not MASP), then proceed to towards other lens.

  20. #20
    Senior Member ZerocoolAstra's Avatar
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    Default Re: photography skill discussions

    I still don't understand why newbies persist with asking questions like "what settings should I use for night/day/sunrise/sunset/fireworks shots?".
    That's like asking "what gear should I select on my mountain bike to climb a slope?"
    The point is to learn the concept of gearing, then apply in on-the-go when riding the bike.

    Similarly for photography, the whole idea is to learn how aperture, shutter speed, ISO, white balance, etc affect the final outcome of the image, then use that grey matter located within your skull (that's the hard part I think) to figure out (with some trial and error) what settings to use.
    When you can competently use all these settings for a variety of situations, I think you can call yourself a photographer, not a "settings-copier".
    Exploring! :)

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