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Thread: To top up and get into semi-pro, or just leave it at entry level?

  1. #21
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    Default Re: To top up and get into semi-pro, or just leave it at entry level?

    Quote Originally Posted by Linerax View Post
    I believe I'll just do without the dry cabi for the time being, and will stick to a simple cleaning kit and a blower!


    cleaning kit and blower is for getting dust/stains off lens and body.. doesn't prevent against fungus.

    my suggestion is to get the dry cab or dry box when purchasing your slr.

    If you ask me, I'd say get the 500D. Use the remaining $200+ to get the dry cab, and maybe a battery grip if you consider 500D grip small. In terms of image quality, 500D and 50D are very very identical. So unless you intend to shoot sports, you don't need 50D 6.5fps.

    50D looks out of your budget anyway, if factoring in dry cab, which imo is a must-get 'accessory'.
    Photography is about seeing without a camera.
    60D | LX3 | Flickr

  2. #22
    Member Radiant's Avatar
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    Default Re: To top up and get into semi-pro, or just leave it at entry level?

    500D Kit 1 - $1,170 (or 2nd hand 40D @ 1,000 and 18-55mm IS @170)
    UV filter $~20 for kit I lens
    Blue Silica Gel $5
    Any big enough box with seal $12
    Lens blower kit $6
    50mm f1.8 $120 + $12 UV filter
    Camera bag sling type $55

    Just nice $1,400

  3. #23
    Moderator daredevil123's Avatar
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    Default Re: To top up and get into semi-pro, or just leave it at entry level?

    Quote Originally Posted by Linerax View Post
    While bodies tend to depreciated a lot faster than lenses i.e every month or so, isn't the lenses the one we're changing more often compared to the body? ><

    I was thinking I should stick with my kit lens (possibly the 50mm prime) for the time being, and then decide on what lens I want to get after a year or so.
    Actually we change bodies faster than lenses. Lenses we tend to collect and not change.

  4. #24
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    Default Re: To top up and get into semi-pro, or just leave it at entry level?

    sometimes e-quotes are a bit higher. try going to slr revolution across from j316 as john's prices are most times higher, and you may be able to find it in funan within your budget.

  5. #25

    Default Re: To top up and get into semi-pro, or just leave it at entry level?

    Quote Originally Posted by Radiant View Post
    500D Kit 1 - $1,170 (or 2nd hand 40D @ 1,000 and 18-55mm IS @170)
    UV filter $~20 for kit I lens
    Blue Silica Gel $5
    Any big enough box with seal $12
    Lens blower kit $6
    50mm f1.8 $120 + $12 UV filter
    Camera bag sling type $55

    Just nice $1,400
    You've certainly planned everything out for me!

    Guess this is what I'll be getting:

    500D Kit I - $1,180 (J316, inclusive of 8GB card and a bag.)
    50mm f/1.8 II - $120
    Dry cabinet - Can I have a price for this..?
    Lens blower kit $6

    Just curious, for the UV filter, will both of them be the same for both kit lens and prime lens? Or are they of different diameter?

    Also, can the dry cabinet be bought at the shop itself? Or must I go somewhere else?
    Last edited by Linerax; 26th December 2009 at 04:55 PM.

  6. #26
    Member Radiant's Avatar
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    Default Re: To top up and get into semi-pro, or just leave it at entry level?

    Look for Jason from SLR Revo which is across from J316.
    Better prcing there.

    Filter sizes may be different depending on lenses. The price I put there is for non-coated UV. Better to get multi-coated ones tho but cost more.

    30L Dry Cabinet is $168. J316 sells it but you can go to Orient Photo @ Sim Lim level 6 to buy too.

    If you want the really cheapest stuff in town then PM me......I send you the list...hahahhahaa

    Remember to check out www.canon.com.sg for the lastest canon promo and make sure you get all the freebies listed there.

  7. #27

    Default Re: To top up and get into semi-pro, or just leave it at entry level?

    Quote Originally Posted by Radiant View Post
    Look for Jason from SLR Revo which is across from J316.
    Better prcing there.

    Filter sizes may be different depending on lenses. The price I put there is for non-coated UV. Better to get multi-coated ones tho but cost more.

    30L Dry Cabinet is $168. J316 sells it but you can go to Orient Photo @ Sim Lim level 6 to buy too.

    If you want the really cheapest stuff in town then PM me......I send you the list...hahahhahaa

    Remember to check out www.canon.com.sg for the lastest canon promo and make sure you get all the freebies listed there.
    J316's stated that all their prices are inclusive of 8GB cards and a bag, does that mean that I won't get the user manual? (500D)

    Woah, the dry cabinet is.. painful.

  8. #28
    Member sf_kang's Avatar
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    Default Re: To top up and get into semi-pro, or just leave it at entry level?

    Hi Linerax, I followed this thread and observed the various questions you asked and the responses received, and I appreciate that you're working on a very tight budget. I have been shooting for over 30+ years and would like to offer some practical suggestions.
    1) A good body and some good lenses are definitely necessary to achieve decent photographic results. You did not mention what you main interests/subjects are? e.g. portraits, landscape and travel, action and sports, low light and night photography, or just shooting events in general.
    2) While a semi-pro body is great to have, it is not absolutely necessary. Check and ask around (incl CS B&S). You should be able to find used bodies and lenses that are in really fine condition. Build up your system as your skills and needs grow. Naturally, a semi-pro body would be build more robustly than a pure consumer camera - so is the price. Unless you really are going to shoot in quite adverse conditions, e.g. snow, rain, desert, and really push your system hard, it is not really necessary to move into semi-pro bodies.

    Hope this helps.
    Fred

  9. #29

    Default Re: To top up and get into semi-pro, or just leave it at entry level?

    Quote Originally Posted by Linerax View Post
    J316's stated that all their prices are inclusive of 8GB cards and a bag, does that mean that I won't get the user manual? (500D)

    Woah, the dry cabinet is.. painful.
    as much as what you have read, the fact is that John3:16 prices are slightly higher than other shops..slightly..but since you are under such a tight budget...i believe every dollar should count for you...

    Yes, they have very good service, but not that the other shops suck. you should get prices from other shops too to compare, and if significantly better (around $50) you may wanna consider otherwise...

    Also, in my person opinion, if you are confident of coughing up enough money within the next 2-3 mths (and in the mean time use your camera regularly...) i do believe that you can hold back your dry cabinet purchase till later, if that is what you prefer..like u said, constant use will prevent fungus growth..
    Nikonian!
    ~Jon's~

  10. #30
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    Default Re: To top up and get into semi-pro, or just leave it at entry level?

    if dry cab is too ex, you can also consider dry box, which should be cheaper..

    tell you what, forgo the UV filters and use the money for dry box/cab.

    just be more careful not to scratch the lens.. anyway, it isn't that easy to scratch the front element anyway.
    Photography is about seeing without a camera.
    60D | LX3 | Flickr

  11. #31
    Member watsup's Avatar
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    Default Re: To top up and get into semi-pro, or just leave it at entry level?

    i think the 30L dry cabinet is ard 118 - 130... correct me if i am wrong

  12. #32

    Default Re: To top up and get into semi-pro, or just leave it at entry level?

    Quote Originally Posted by sf_kang View Post
    Hi Linerax, I followed this thread and observed the various questions you asked and the responses received, and I appreciate that you're working on a very tight budget. I have been shooting for over 30+ years and would like to offer some practical suggestions.
    1) A good body and some good lenses are definitely necessary to achieve decent photographic results. You did not mention what you main interests/subjects are? e.g. portraits, landscape and travel, action and sports, low light and night photography, or just shooting events in general.
    2) While a semi-pro body is great to have, it is not absolutely necessary. Check and ask around (incl CS B&S). You should be able to find used bodies and lenses that are in really fine condition. Build up your system as your skills and needs grow. Naturally, a semi-pro body would be build more robustly than a pure consumer camera - so is the price. Unless you really are going to shoot in quite adverse conditions, e.g. snow, rain, desert, and really push your system hard, it is not really necessary to move into semi-pro bodies.

    Hope this helps.
    Fred
    I've happened to chance across a post in CS, which is why I'm deciding to stick to my kit lens/prime lens for a year first. The post as follows:

    Here's my advice, which I have given out countless times, to people who want to start photography...as a HOBBY / PASTIME. (Professionals need not apply):

    1. Get a DSLR kit YOU feel comfortable..not what the neighbour's dog deems good. Its YOUR money, YOUR hands and YOUR decision. You can ask for experiences and details from fellow photogs...but nothing beats going down to the shop and holding it in your hand. You don't ask your friend to help you pick a wife, do you?

    2. Stick with the kit lens. I repeat, stick with the kit lens. Do not be tempted to spend additional money buying another lens...that will come later. Use the kit lens first.

    3. Join as many photog outings as possible. It doesn't matter what sort. It could be models, night shoots, walkabouts, nature, architectural, studio...whatever it is, just join them. The reason is simple: YOU have to know the LIMITS of your own DSLR. YOU have to know your OWN limits. Keeping the camera in a glass cupboard does not work.

    4. USE the camera, USE the camera, USE the camera. Do not be anal retentive and lose your sleep over a scratch on the camera body. You spent good money on it, so the least you can do is use it. If your intention in maintaining its perfect condition is to sell it away...go open a camera shop.

    5. After at least A YEAR of shooting, sit down and decide what sort of themes or subjects are your favourite. Do not be a hero and try to shoot every single subject in the world...it is not possible. If you like cars and aircraft, you are probably into high-speed themes. If you like cosplays or models, you are geared more towards human portraits themes.
    -ClipperSG
    Thanks for the input! Guess I'll be sticking to the entry level one!
    Quote Originally Posted by tanjonhan View Post
    as much as what you have read, the fact is that John3:16 prices are slightly higher than other shops..slightly..but since you are under such a tight budget...i believe every dollar should count for you...

    Yes, they have very good service, but not that the other shops suck. you should get prices from other shops too to compare, and if significantly better (around $50) you may wanna consider otherwise...

    Also, in my person opinion, if you are confident of coughing up enough money within the next 2-3 mths (and in the mean time use your camera regularly...) i do believe that you can hold back your dry cabinet purchase till later, if that is what you prefer..like u said, constant use will prevent fungus growth..
    I'm certainly not confident of coughing up enough money to buy a dry cabinet in 3 months! I only managed to save up so much because I did some part time jobs during this holiday, which isn't quite possible once school starts. But if I'm going to get the 500D, then I guess I've a little left over for the dry cabinet!
    Quote Originally Posted by ianhyk View Post
    if dry cab is too ex, you can also consider dry box, which should be cheaper..

    tell you what, forgo the UV filters and use the money for dry box/cab.

    just be more careful not to scratch the lens.. anyway, it isn't that easy to scratch the front element anyway.
    Prevention is better than cure, I guess. I'd rather spend $20 on a cheap filter than risk getting my kit lens scratched.

    Quote Originally Posted by watsup View Post
    i think the 30L dry cabinet is ard 118 - 130... correct me if i am wrong
    Thanks!

  13. #33
    Senior Member Anson's Avatar
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    Default Re: To top up and get into semi-pro, or just leave it at entry level?

    Seem like no one take into account of an external flash unit? For indoor shots (low light), knowing how to control your flash often play a bigger role than the body and the flash.

  14. #34

    Default Re: To top up and get into semi-pro, or just leave it at entry level?

    Quote Originally Posted by Anson View Post
    Seem like no one take into account of an external flash unit? For indoor shots (low light), knowing how to control your flash often play a bigger role than the body and the flash.
    Did you reply into the wrong thread?

  15. #35

    Default Re: To top up and get into semi-pro, or just leave it at entry level?

    Both the 50D and the 500D are currently out of stock from SLR Revo.

    The pricing between the 500D Kit I is pretty slight though! Time to get a complete quote from J316!

  16. #36

    Default Re: To top up and get into semi-pro, or just leave it at entry level?

    Solution for you

    Pentax Kx. ~$950 with 18-55mm kit lens. This leaves you money for other stuff or even better return your mother the $400
    Certainly great value for money. Don't be fooled by the word 'entry level'. Go check out the list of features on it yourself.

    http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/pentaxkx/


    If staying with Canon. I do think the 500D is good value for money as Canon cameras go. (The newer cameras from all brands seem to be much better featured than 1 model ago)

  17. #37

    Default Re: To top up and get into semi-pro, or just leave it at entry level?

    Quote Originally Posted by pinholecam View Post
    Solution for you

    Pentax Kx. ~$950 with 18-55mm kit lens. This leaves you money for other stuff or even better return your mother the $400
    Certainly great value for money. Don't be fooled by the word 'entry level'. Go check out the list of features on it yourself.

    http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/pentaxkx/


    If staying with Canon. I do think the 500D is good value for money as Canon cameras go. (The newer cameras from all brands seem to be much better featured than 1 model ago)
    Hi there!

    Thanks for attempting to introduce another DSLR camera to me, but I've done my fair share of the research and Canon UI appeals to me more than other brands be it Nikon, Sony or Pentax. I believe that being appealed and feeling comfortable with your camera is what most of you photographers refer to as 'feel', and in my regard, the UI plays a huge role.

    Still, thanks!

  18. #38

    Default Re: To top up and get into semi-pro, or just leave it at entry level?

    Quote Originally Posted by Linerax View Post
    Just got the price quote reply from J316.



    Doesn't look too optimistic now.
    try just buying a new 50D only, and used kit lens... used kit lens non IS is 50 and below... and then save for better lens in the future..
    life is but a dream...

  19. #39
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    Default Re: To top up and get into semi-pro, or just leave it at entry level?

    Quote Originally Posted by Anson View Post
    Seem like no one take into account of an external flash unit? For indoor shots (low light), knowing how to control your flash often play a bigger role than the body and the flash.
    because its not necessary, not everyone take loads of moving object under lowlight. My flash can easily sleep in my drycab for a year as my shooting doesn't require it.

    As far as what accessories to get, i think its better to do one step at a time. 1st get a kit and slowly explore in to it, you will find out what is missing soon. Its better than hearing what other say and then buying all the accessories together and find that you don't even use it.

  20. #40

    Default Re: To top up and get into semi-pro, or just leave it at entry level?

    Ok, so you're sticking to Canon. If I remember correctly, 500D shares 50D's sensor. So imaging capabilities wise, you are better off using 500D while on a budget. 50D had the advantage in the past while being compared with 450D cos of its superior sensor but not so now with 500D.

    I just gone through over the past 2 months what you are thinking about now, so I thought maybe I can share with you my thought process:

    You can get a 500D system at 1.2k from the reputable shops no doubt. What I would suggest is that you get used to the kit lens first. For a starter, a 18-55mm f3.5-5.6 kit lens is a very good glass only if you are able to maximise its potential and learn from it. Hold on to your cash for the 50mm f1.8 first. My rationale is that (1) you learn to compose on your kit lens more easily compared to the 50mm thanks to its flexibility (2) you can play with your kit lens taped down on 50mm to know if you really need a 50mm fast lens (or any other wide angle or telephoto primes) and (3) you can save on not buying a dry cabinet.

    I think I should elaborate more on my third point. By not having spare lens lying around (ie, you have your kit lens constantly on your 500D body), you already have a sealed system that does not require you to open up and expose the sensor to dust and moisture. So long as you regularly use your 500D to shoot, a dry cabinet is rather redundant. The 100+ bucks for a dry cabinet would come in useful only if you have more than a piece of glass and there are extended periods of time when you wont be using it, hence leaving it in the dry cabinet would preserve its state from mold and the likes.

    What I would think you need more now is the 500D kit and the right filters to work with.

    Just my two cents worth.

    P.S. I got myself a Nikon D90 by the way; the 500D was my initial consideration before I realise I needed better low light performance at high ISO sensitivities.

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