Results 1 to 11 of 11

Thread: storing new rolls of flim in a freezer.

  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Jurong West
    Posts
    314

    Default storing new rolls of flim in a freezer.

    hi, after taking out from the freezer to use the film, will the heat outside cause condensation in the film? cos its cold inside and warm outside. Pls advice.. thanx...

  2. #2

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by nickpower
    hi, after taking out from the freezer to use the film, will the heat outside cause condensation in the film? cos its cold inside and warm outside. Pls advice.. thanx...
    no no no... you dont store film in freezer. you store them in the vegetable compartment.

  3. #3
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    East
    Posts
    706

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by nickpower
    hi, after taking out from the freezer to use the film, will the heat outside cause condensation in the film? cos its cold inside and warm outside. Pls advice.. thanx...
    Yup, definitely will have s condensation. So take the film out of the fridge in advance before using. And there is no need to store in the freezer. The fridge main compartment is good enough.

  4. #4

    Lightbulb Some advice

    Quote Originally Posted by nickpower
    hi, after taking out from the freezer to use the film, will the heat outside cause condensation in the film? cos its cold inside and warm outside. Pls advice.. thanx...
    Firstly, only store professional films in the fridge. Consumer films have matured, there is no need to store them in the fridge because it makes no difference.

    Secondly, you will need to remove them well in advance before use to allow for it to be brought to room temperature and avoiding condensation.

  5. #5
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Jurong West
    Posts
    314

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by reachme2003
    Firstly, only store professional films in the fridge. Consumer films have matured, there is no need to store them in the fridge because it makes no difference.

    Secondly, you will need to remove them well in advance before use to allow for it to be brought to room temperature and avoiding condensation.
    Oic.. thanx....... guys

  6. #6

    Default

    I noticed that the higher ISO films or the more sensitive the film is, the lower storage temperature is required.

    Superia 1600 indicates a temp of <33 degrees, while Delta 3200 indicates <24 degrees..

  7. #7

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Winston
    I noticed that the higher ISO films or the more sensitive the film is, the lower storage temperature is required.

    Superia 1600 indicates a temp of <33 degrees, while Delta 3200 indicates <24 degrees..
    Not necessarily. It really depends on what kind of film it is. For example, it is recommended to store Press and Provia 15'C and below.

    For consumer films, it does make a bit of sense to put it in a fridge to extend it's usable life (in a way push back its expiry date); basically to retard even more the chemical breakdown process and stuff. Of course, that is only when you buy film and store them for more than a year...

  8. #8

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Ah Pao
    Not necessarily. It really depends on what kind of film it is. For example, it is recommended to store Press and Provia 15'C and below.

    For consumer films, it does make a bit of sense to put it in a fridge to extend it's usable life (in a way push back its expiry date); basically to retard even more the chemical breakdown process and stuff. Of course, that is only when you buy film and store them for more than a year...
    Will it be the same if i store it in a drybox instead? Thank you.

  9. #9

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Lister
    Will it be the same if i store it in a drybox instead? Thank you.
    no... the chemical emulsion will dry up faster in a dry box.. try not to store your film in the dry box

  10. #10

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mervlam
    no... the chemical emulsion will dry up faster in a dry box.. try not to store your film in the dry box
    Then again a fridge has a lower humidity level than a drybox...isn't it?
    Just store according to manufacturer's instructions and nothing will go wrong. Modern film emulsions are pretty hardy.

  11. #11

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Ah Pao
    Then again a fridge has a lower humidity level than a drybox...isn't it?
    Just store according to manufacturer's instructions and nothing will go wrong. Modern film emulsions are pretty hardy.
    I dunno

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •