Results 1 to 17 of 17

Thread: Helps of Eneloop Batt

  1. #1

    Default Helps of Eneloop Batt

    Bought some Eneloop batt, and have a few question

    Do i need to charge before using, fresh in the box. And how long will that be?

    Is Eneloop batt a NiMH? or NiCD? my is a size AA HR-3UTG 1.2V 2000mAh type

    Thanks for all your help in advance before i start using them!

  2. #2
    Senior Member TheChef's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Where the action is
    Posts
    2,304

    Default Re: Helps of Eneloop Batt

    I believe it comes with instruction and specification. Read them.
    S5Pro|S3Pro|D50|16-85VR2|70-200VR|80-400VR|S50f1.4|105f2|135f2|SB900|SB80DX

  3. #3

    Default Re: Helps of Eneloop Batt

    It should be NiMH; not necessary to charge them out of the box as the holding charge for these batteries are excellent.
    Sony RX100 Mk4

  4. #4
    Moderator catchlights's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Punggol, Singapore
    Posts
    21,902

    Default Re: Helps of Eneloop Batt

    is NiMh batteries, able to hold charge for long period.

    nothing wrong to charge it again before you using them, especially if you plan to use them the first time for an important event.
    Shoot to Live, Live to Shoot
    www.benjaminloo.com | iStock portfolio

  5. #5

    Default Re: Helps of Eneloop Batt

    Have you tried to just google "Eneloop"? You'd have all your answers.
    Alpha

  6. #6

    Default Re: Helps of Eneloop Batt

    Quote Originally Posted by ZerocoolAstra View Post
    Here's your answer!
    You can't hotlink images from Akihabaranews...
    Alpha

  7. #7

    Default Re: Helps of Eneloop Batt

    Thanks guys! I read the instruction and looked through the whole package before posting it here. Read some post on Eneloop in clubsnap too, thanks for the help!!!

  8. #8
    Senior Member Diavonex's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Admiralty
    Posts
    3,641

    Default Re: Helps of Eneloop Batt

    You can check the status of the battery with a volt meter.

    A fully charged Ni-MH battery is 1.42 volts.

  9. #9
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Pasir Ris, Singapore
    Posts
    14,002

    Default Re: Helps of Eneloop Batt

    Quote Originally Posted by acemonte View Post
    Bought some Eneloop batt, and have a few question

    Do i need to charge before using, fresh in the box. And how long will that be?

    Is Eneloop batt a NiMH? or NiCD? my is a size AA HR-3UTG 1.2V 2000mAh type

    Thanks for all your help in advance before i start using them!
    It's NiMH and the rating's correct. U do not have to charge them before using as they come pre-charged so u can use out of the box.
    Canon EOS 5D, 24-70 f/4 L IS, 50 f/1.2 L, 70-300 f/4-5.6 L IS, 600EX-RT. Sigma 12-24 f/4.5-5.6 EX.

  10. #10
    Senior Member CS TAN's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Hong Kong
    Posts
    3,663

    Default Re: Helps of Eneloop Batt

    It is a hybrid NiMH battery with ability to hold 80% of charge even after one year. Can use straight out of the box but if you have time, why not give it a charge so you know the batteries are fully charge before use?
    Canon 5D Mark II | 24-105L | 35L | 85L II | 135L | Samyang 14mm 2.8

  11. #11
    Senior Member ZerocoolAstra's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    rainy Singapore
    Posts
    9,523

    Default Re: Helps of Eneloop Batt

    Quote Originally Posted by Rashkae View Post
    You can't hotlink images from Akihabaranews...
    ooops! I just deleted my post then.
    Thanks for the info.
    Exploring! :)

  12. #12

    Default Re: Helps of Eneloop Batt

    Aiya... I was too slow. Bec the Akihabaranews window was showing a big pig cartoon logo. I was about to say.... oooorrrr, you say eneloop users are pigs.

    Quote Originally Posted by ZerocoolAstra View Post
    ooops! I just deleted my post then.
    Thanks for the info.

  13. #13

    Default Re: Helps of Eneloop Batt

    Though it comes pre-charged, it still requires some sort of seasoning to get to the fullest capacity (You have to do a couple of charge / discharge cycles). NiCd is long dead and they are now made in very limited quantities for special needs (You'll hardly ever find them in the market).

  14. #14

    Default Re: Helps of Eneloop Batt

    Not really, NiCd still have their use in power tools, cos of their advantages which other battery chemistry may not have/lacking.

    http://www.batteryuniversity.com/partone-4.htm

    The nickel-based battery, its dominance and the future (BU4)

    In this section we evaluate the strengths and limitations of various battery chemistries, beginning with the nickel. Each battery system offers unique advantages but none provides a fully satisfactory solution. With the increased selection of battery chemistries available today, better choices can be made to address specific battery needs. A careful evaluation of each battery's attribute is important. Because of similarities, both nickel-cadmium and nickel-metal hydride are covered in this paper.

    The nickel-cadmium battery

    Swedish Waldmar Jungner invented the nickel-cadmium battery in 1899. At that time, the materials were expensive compared to other battery types available and its use was limited to special applications. In 1932, the active materials were deposited inside a porous nickel-plated electrode and in 1947 research began on a sealed nickel-cadmium battery.

    Rather than venting, the internal gases generated during charge were recombined. These advances led to the modern sealed nickel-cadmium battery, which is in use today.

    Nickel-cadmium prefers fast charge to slow charge and pulse charge to DC charge. It is a strong and silent worker; hard labor poses little problem. In fact, nickel-cadmium is the only battery type that performs well under rigorous working conditions. All other chemistries prefer a shallow discharge and moderate load currents.

    Nickel-cadmium does not like to be pampered by sitting in chargers for days and being used only occasionally for brief periods. A periodic full discharge is so important that, if omitted, large crystals will form on the cell plates (also referred to as memory) and the nickel-cadmium will gradually lose its performance.

    Among rechargeable batteries, nickel-cadmium remains a popular choice for two-way radios, emergency medical equipment and power tools. There is shift towards batteries with higher energy densities and less toxic metals but alternative chemistries cannot always match the superior durability and low cost of nickel-cadmium.

    Here is a summary of the advantages and limitations of nickel-cadmium batteries.

    Advantages

    * Fast and simple charge, even after prolonged storage.
    * High number of charge/discharge cycles - if properly maintained, nickel-cadmium provides over 1000 charge/discharge cycles.
    * Good load performance - nickel-cadmium allows recharging at low temperatures.
    * Long shelf life - five-year storage is possible. Some priming prior to use will be required.
    * Simple storage and transportation - most airfreight companies accept nickel-cadmium without special conditions.
    * Good low temperature performance.
    * Forgiving if abused - nickel-cadmium is one of the most rugged rechargeable batteries.
    * Economically priced - nickel-cadmium is lowest in terms of cost per cycle.
    * Available in a wide range of sizes and performance options - most nickel-cadmium cells are cylindrical.

    Limitations

    * Relatively low energy density.
    * Memory effect - nickel-cadmium must periodically be exercised (discharge/charge) to prevent memory.
    * Environmentally unfriendly - nickel-cadmium contains toxic metals. Some countries restrict its use.
    * Relatively high self-discharge - needs recharging after storage

    The nickel-metal-hydride battery

    Research on the nickel-metal-hydride system started in the 1970s as a means of storing hydrogen for the nickel hydrogen battery. Today, nickel hydrogen is used mainly for satellite applications. nickel hydrogen batteries are bulky, require high-pressure steel canisters and cost thousands of dollars per cell.

    In the early experimental days of nickel-metal hydride, the metal hydride alloys were unstable in the cell environment and the desired performance characteristics could not be achieved. As a result, the development of nickel-metal hydride slowed down. New hydride alloys were developed in the 1980s that were stable enough for use in a cell. Since then, nickel-metal hydride has steadily improved.

    The success of nickel-metal hydride has been driven by high energy density and the use of environmentally friendly metals. The modern nickel-metal hydride offers up to 40% higher energy density compared to the standard nickel-cadmium. There is potential for yet higher capacities, but not without some negative side effects.

    Nickel-metal hydride is less durable than nickel-cadmium. Cycling under heavy load and storage at high temperature reduces the service life. nickel-metal hydride suffers from high self-discharge, which is higher than that of nickel-cadmium.

    Nickel-metal hydride has been replacing nickel-cadmium in markets such as wireless communications and mobile computing. Experts agree that nickel-metal hydride has greatly improved over the years, but limitations remain. Most shortcomings are native to the nickel-based technology and are shared with nickel-cadmium. It is widely accepted that nickel-metal hydride is an interim step to lithium-based battery technology.

    Here is a summary of the advantages and limitations of nickel-metal hydride batteries.

    Advantages

    * 30-40% higher capacity than standard nickel-cadmium. Nickel-metal-hydride has potential for yet higher energy densities.
    * Less prone to memory than nickel-cadmium - fewer exercise cycles are required.
    * Simple storage and transportation - transport is not subject to regulatory control.
    * Environmentally friendly - contains only mild toxins; profitable for recycling.

    Limitations

    * Limited service life - the performance starts to deteriorate after 200-300 cycles if repeatedly deeply cycled.
    * Relatively short storage of three years. Cool temperature and a partial charge slows aging.
    * Limited discharge current - although nickel-metal-hydride is capable of delivering high discharge currents, heavy load reduces the battery's cycle life.
    * More complex charge algorithm needed - nickel-metal-hydride generates more heat during charge and requires slightly longer charge times than nickel-cadmium. Trickle charge settings are critical because the battery cannot absorb overcharge.
    * High self-discharge - typically 50% higher than nickel-cadmium.
    * Performance degrades if stored at elevated temperatures - nickel-metal-hydride should be stored in a cool place at 40% state-of-charge.
    * High maintenance - nickel-metal hydride requires regular full discharge to prevent crystalline formation. nickel-cadmium should be exercised once a month, nickel-metal-hydride once in every 3 months.

  15. #15

    Default Re: Helps of Eneloop Batt

    If there isn't any indication of date of manufacture and you're expected a fair bit of power from that pack of battery, best is to have them charged first as they could have been on the shelf for more than a year or longer.

  16. #16

    Default Re: Helps of Eneloop Batt

    Quote Originally Posted by user12343 View Post
    Not really, NiCd still have their use in power tools, cos of their advantages which other battery chemistry may not have/lacking.

    http://www.batteryuniversity.com/partone-4.htm
    LOL, did you read the fine print of that article?

    Created: April 2003, Last edited: July 2003
    NiMh has advanced a lot since then and many of the cons that they have listed there is no longer applicable. NiCd is long dead in consumer market and I still stand correct that they are made in limited quantities for special uses.

    Sorry about my OT..

  17. #17

    Default Re: Helps of Eneloop Batt

    nvm the dated website, NiCd is still very much alive today...OT too much... haaa
    Last edited by user12343; 16th December 2009 at 12:51 PM.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •