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Thread: Capturing rain drops

  1. #1

    Default Capturing rain drops

    Newbie here

    Anyone can advise on how to do the above? I am using a G5 with no other other accessories except a tripod. When i tried incresing shutterspeed, it will be too dark but with flash the rain drops will ave a reflection ,
    anyone?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mercury
    Newbie here

    Anyone can advise on how to do the above? I am using a G5 with no other other accessories except a tripod. When i tried incresing shutterspeed, it will be too dark but with flash the rain drops will ave a reflection ,
    anyone?
    i've never shot any rain drop myself but i found this ...
    http://www.photo.net/bboard/q-and-a-...?msg_id=006Tlv

  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by renegade
    i've never shot any rain drop myself but i found this ...
    http://www.photo.net/bboard/q-and-a-...?msg_id=006Tlv
    thanks

    but i was refering to rain drops as they are falling from the sky. something like a motion capture with all the drops frozen in time

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mercury
    thanks

    but i was refering to rain drops as they are falling from the sky. something like a motion capture with all the drops frozen in time

    Put the cam on the tripod. Set the cam to bracketing mode. Bracket using shutter speed. Set the range of shutter speeds. Use maximum aperture size (must be on full manual mode). Then fire away and find the best shutter speed where u get the rain drop and a sufficiently bright background. An already bright background helps also.

    Then set that shutter speed and aperture and using continuous drive mode, fire away until u get the perfect pic.....

    Anyway u are on digital... so no problem..... reshoot until satisfied....

  5. #5

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    hmmmm ok i give it a shot but rain stop liao so next time ba haha.

    actually the problem is that during the rain, it is usually dark and to capture the drops at as it is falling requires a high shutter speed. ( ithink 1/1000) but with that shutter speed even at f2.0 the picture is too dark.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mercury
    hmmmm ok i give it a shot but rain stop liao so next time ba haha.

    actually the problem is that during the rain, it is usually dark and to capture the drops at as it is falling requires a high shutter speed. ( ithink 1/1000) but with that shutter speed even at f2.0 the picture is too dark.

    U can take the rain drops falling from the roofs after the rain.... the sun would be out and the scenery fresh and green.... looks better unless u're after the Zen minimalist feeling of shooting rain in b&w...

  7. #7

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    I guess you might have to wait for a day when the sun shines bright and rain is falling simultaneously?

    Rain Drops?
    I don't have the original file anymore so no EXIF info, but I think I used a large aperture (f2.8-4) and prolly 1/320-1/500 shutter speed?

    Possibly fill-flashed too. That might help. The drops are still streaky though as you can see.

    Another shot where I tried to capture from a higher perspective. Pretty terrible picture, not what I wanted to execute, but am putting this up hoping to exchange pointers:

    Rain Drops? 2
    ISO400 f2.8 1/180

    Probably should have focused closer to get drops in DOF range? Also, the rain was dying off already.

    I would guess an ideal scenario could be:
    - clean background, especially dark background
    - high shutter speed or/and flash to freeze motion

    Though obviously I have no pics to show for it.

    Are you envisioning something "matrix-like" where you can see all the individual drops crystal sharp...?

    Will wait myself for the next rain fall too.

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    Looks like shutter speeds have got to be much higher... hmm.....

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by TME
    U can take the rain drops falling from the roofs after the rain.... the sun would be out and the scenery fresh and green.... looks better unless u're after the Zen minimalist feeling of shooting rain in b&w...
    I actually want a composition where the raindrops are caught right in their tracks during a heavy downpour. The only major problem is lighting. So now i am looking for a well lit street and hope for rain at night.

    also experimenting on spot light at home. so far the shots all look too artificial.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mercury
    I actually want a composition where the raindrops are caught right in their tracks during a heavy downpour. The only major problem is lighting. So now i am looking for a well lit street and hope for rain at night.

    also experimenting on spot light at home. so far the shots all look too artificial.

    It's a bit tough like that........ let us know the end result and post some pics regardless of the result!

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    Quote Originally Posted by TME
    It's a bit tough like that........ let us know the end result and post some pics regardless of the result!
    Rain can be hard to capture on video/film/digital/whatsoever. During a tour of Universal Studios in LA, we are told that in movies, the "rain" has some milk added so that it's more visible when shot. Nevertheless, with the right lighting, background, etc it might just be possible....

    Regards
    CK

  12. #12

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    Rain shots work best when the rain drops are backlit. Try taking from a shade with the sun behind, but not in the frame as it will be too bright and flare may occur. Usually 1/125s is good for conveying motion, freezing ... probably 1/500s.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ckiang
    Rain can be hard to capture on video/film/digital/whatsoever. During a tour of Universal Studios in LA, we are told that in movies, the "rain" has some milk added so that it's more visible when shot. Nevertheless, with the right lighting, background, etc it might just be possible....

    Regards
    CK
    wow ... never knew that. Interesting... adding milk to make it more visible

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