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Thread: How do you store your CD/DVD images?

  1. #1

    Default How do you store your CD/DVD images?

    I had quite a number of old collections store on CD/DVD. To my horror I found it almost all has a white fungus marking.

    I just keep in on the box and never touch it till recently.

    How do you store/keep your cd/dvd and prevent it from having fungus?

  2. #2
    Senior Member Diavonex's Avatar
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    Default Re: How do you store your CD/DVD images?

    Put your CD/DVD in a dry cabinet.

  3. #3

    Default Re: How do you store your CD/DVD images?

    Quote Originally Posted by Diavonex View Post
    Put your CD/DVD in a dry cabinet.
    That would be a costly solution. Any other cheaper solution?

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    Senior Member Diavonex's Avatar
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    Default Re: How do you store your CD/DVD images?

    Quote Originally Posted by pete2322 View Post
    That would be a costly solution. Any other cheaper solution?
    Buy a big plastic container with cover and store your CD/DVD with a Thirty Hippo.

  5. #5

    Default Re: How do you store your CD/DVD images?

    Quote Originally Posted by Diavonex View Post
    Buy a big plastic container with cover and store your CD/DVD with a Thirty Hippo.
    Anyone really does that?

    Am I left no choice but to store the cds just like the lenses?

    Is that's normally a photographer store their collection in a dry cabinet?

  6. #6
    Senior Member Diavonex's Avatar
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    Default Re: How do you store your CD/DVD images?

    You can transfer all your data/pictures from CD/DVD to a 1TB hard disk; it's easier to manage.

    CD/DVD are very unreliable form of storage.

  7. #7
    Moderator Octarine's Avatar
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    Default Re: How do you store your CD/DVD images?

    Quote Originally Posted by pete2322 View Post
    Anyone really does that?
    Am I left no choice but to store the cds just like the lenses?
    Is that's normally a photographer store their collection in a dry cabinet?
    Research has shown that humidity and temperature affect lifetime of CD and DVD. Lower humidity already helps a lot. After you have seen mould eating into the rim of a CD and DVD you'll know That's where the suggestion comes from to store your CD and DVD in dry cabinet. Not sure why you think this is expensive. A booklet with soft inlets can easily store 20..30 of them and as long as you don't buy your dry cabinet 'tight fit' there's always space left.
    As Diavonex mentioned, in the long run and given the current price level and quality of hard disks you are better off with them. As long as there is no physical impact they can last a long time and they are not affected by climate.
    Last edited by Octarine; 23rd November 2009 at 11:39 AM.
    EOS

  8. #8

    Default Re: How do you store your CD/DVD images?

    Hard disk might run into data corruption. I used to archieve it to a hard disk until it suddenly corrupt. Or Am I just unlucky or which brand and type of hardisk is better and more reliable?

    Maybe I'm paranoid but storing in a cd/dvd at least the data wont suddenly corrupt.

  9. #9
    Moderator Octarine's Avatar
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    Default Re: How do you store your CD/DVD images?

    Quote Originally Posted by pete2322 View Post
    Hard disk might run into data corruption. I used to archieve it to a hard disk until it suddenly corrupt. Or Am I just unlucky or which brand and type of hardisk is better and more reliable?
    Maybe I'm paranoid but storing in a cd/dvd at least the data wont suddenly corrupt.
    Where do you get this information from? Instead of being paranoid you might want to read up and be informed. Makes life a bit easier
    What kind of 'corruption' do you mean? There are several ways how data can become unreadable by the computer, laymen call it 'corrupted' but the success of data recovery companies shows that it's not all lost obviously. Also, corruption is a slow process, it doesn't happen so suddenly. But most people don't see the early signs and (to be fair), Windows is not a system that can handle such issues properly. Most common are logical errors in file system or within the file. Errors within the file (e.g. Powerpoint or Word can't read its own stuff etc.) need to be dealt with at application level. Sometimes it helps to use Openoffice and save the presentation / document into a new file.

    Logical errors:
    Such errors happen in the file systems. By design, Windows file systems (FAT and NTFS) are more prone to such errors. Prevention is better than cure. Once you got a new hard disk make sure to format the HDD always with your computer, never accept existing file systems. Copy your data in one go and don't work on the backup data (opening, editing, saving files). By this the file system stays pretty consistent. Unmount properly using the task bar icons, don't just pull the USB plug. When you do backups then rotate with 2 folders at least, keeping 2 generations. Always keep existing backups till the new backup is successfully done. Then delete the oldest backup (folder). With the capacity of current HDD you can easily keep multiple generations.
    Use system tools of Windows regularly to check the file system for errors. In addition, after several generations of backup you can copy all valid backups to your computer (or spare disk), reformat the entire HDD (DON'T use 'Quick Format'!) and copy all backups back again.

    Physical errors:
    Here we have a bunch of problems that can occur, ranging from simple sector faults to head crash, controller failures and other nasty things. Read the long-term reviews and long-term reports (not sure whether these things exist here in local media where everything is focused on newest gadgets and nonsense) so whether a certain brand or model has significant problems. In addition, check about S.M.A.R.T monitoring tools for Windows. Not that easy if you never went into that area but at least you can get some additional information about the 'intestines' of the disk. Do read up all manuals to understand the error messages and their meaning.
    Media failures are addresses by redundancy. You can simple use 2 sets of HDD for your backups. Alternatively, have a look at NAS appliances where 2 disks work as RAID1. Additional advantage: those RAID1 appliances work with embedded Linux. If one disk fails or the controller then the other disk is readable on any normal Linux system.
    EOS

  10. #10

    Default Re: How do you store your CD/DVD images?

    Octarine, thanks. That's too technical for me. But I learned that I need to backup the data.

    For my case, all of a sudden the drive just don't recognise it as an usb hard disk.

  11. #11
    Moderator Octarine's Avatar
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    Default Re: How do you store your CD/DVD images?

    Quote Originally Posted by pete2322 View Post
    For my case, all of a sudden the drive just don't recognise it as an usb hard disk.
    Can have several reasons .. if it's 3.5inch drive then get a new HDD case and try. Had already 2 cases where the USB-SATA adapter in the HDD case died. The drive still worked well, no problems with the data.
    If you want to prevent problems you need to know about the problems Not that you need to know how FAT or ext2 works - but at least you should know where to find the 'check utilities'
    EOS

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