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Thread: Does dust get into zoom lens easily?

  1. #1

    Default Does dust get into zoom lens easily?

    Hi guys..

    Just wondering if dust gets in zoom lens much easier than prime lens? Are there any zoom lenses out there that are better protected than others? Tks.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Falcon
    Hi guys..

    Just wondering if dust gets in zoom lens much easier than prime lens? Are there any zoom lenses out there that are better protected than others? Tks.
    I do believe its the case for your first question. As an experiment, remove the rear cap to your zoom lens and put the rear close to your face (close to it, not on it lest you want to leave an oil mark ) Try turning the zoom barrel in and out rapidly. You would probably feel a slight breeze coming out from the rear. The zooming action causes air to enter through the folds in the zoom barrel and the air is dispelled through the rear. Zooms are hence more suceptible to dust as the latter is sucked into the lens especially when there is zooming.

    Dunno about your second question though cuz its probably out of my league (from a financial pov).

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    Actually, hard to avoid. There are dust anytime anywhere
    Dancing desert scorpion
    :devil:

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    Quote Originally Posted by jnifur
    Actually, hard to avoid. There are dust anytime anywhere
    True. Just that some you see, and some you don't. Makes me wonder about all those people enjoying ice-creams where there's heavy vehicular traffic.

    My 17-40L comes with a weather-strip that seals it to the camera body. Still...it doesn't provide any help from the time the lens is removed to the time the rear cap is replaced. Like that, basically called," Lan Lan." Cantonese: Zhao Um Lat. You get the idea.
    Last edited by PLRBEAR; 1st February 2004 at 02:09 AM.

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by PLRBEAR
    True. Just that some you see, and some you don't. Makes me wonder about all those people enjoying ice-creams where there's heavy vehicular traffic.

    My 17-40L comes with a weather-strip that seals it to the camera body. Still...it doesn't provide any help from the time the lens is removed to the time the rear cap is replaced. Like that, basically called," Lan Lan." Cantonese: Zhao Um Lat. You get the idea.
    so in this case, if after prolonged period of using a zoom capable camera, then how can one remove or clean off these dust? do i need to go back to the vendor or if under warranty for servicing? if not, how much does it costs for such clean-ups?

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    Quote Originally Posted by mongoose
    so in this case, if after prolonged period of using a zoom capable camera, then how can one remove or clean off these dust? do i need to go back to the vendor or if under warranty for servicing? if not, how much does it costs for such clean-ups?
    Dust hardly affects images on a digital camera. When you say "zoom capable" does that describe a camera with a "built-in" lens? If so, then your problem should be somewhat minimal. DSLRs have a harder time escaping this problem since the lens can be removed. As far as dust on the CCD or CMOS goes in a "built-in" lens goes...have to be cleaned by repair centre, but shouldn't cause you any grief anyway. DSLR CCDs/CMOS can be cleaned DIY by using the proper tools and methods. There's a thread on this somewhere; do a search.

    I wouldn't worry about it too much, unless you're really picky. Even on a DSLR, it's probably (my best guess) an annual affair.

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    The dust in a construction site on a dry day is terrible, when a big truck has just driven by. Other than that, dust isn't that big a problem. If your lens doesn't cost a fortune, say less than 500 bucks for me, this consumer lens is meant to be used, abused for say 5 years. If you use often enough, by then, the amount of dust inside may be the reason to retire the lens and move on to get newer ones, that are better design, lighter, smaller and so much better.

    So, old lenses like more than 3 years old, or those that are used real often would tend to have lots of dust, so more prone to flare, loss of contrast, etc. I understand that some pro lenses are sent for servicing, cleaning, etc. Could it be reassemble perfectly? As far as I am concerned, the lens is then no longer "virgin".

    By the way, when I shoot at construction sites, I bring my old and cheap gear and hold my breath when that big truck passes by.

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by tert
    I do believe its the case for your first question. As an experiment, remove the rear cap to your zoom lens and put the rear close to your face (close to it, not on it lest you want to leave an oil mark ) Try turning the zoom barrel in and out rapidly. You would probably feel a slight breeze coming out from the rear. The zooming action causes air to enter through the folds in the zoom barrel and the air is dispelled through the rear. Zooms are hence more suceptible to dust as the latter is sucked into the lens especially when there is zooming.

    Dunno about your second question though cuz its probably out of my league (from a financial pov).
    bro I don't feel the breeze leh ...


    ... cos I have my glasses on.

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    So, the dust depositing onto the coated glass or plastic surfaces of lenses would make a lens age. That is to say, the more we use, the faster it ages, as more dust gets into the lens.

    Now, that means that it is better to get either brand new lenses or if used, the newer it is the better. So, a 3 year old lens with quite a bit of dust is not that wonderful after all, not such a great bargain even if it is at a 50% discount. Old lens with dust means loss of contrast and increase flare. Probably, old lens needs the lens hood more than the brand new lens. Just speculating, not done any verification.

    One more thing - might be better off using new cheaper glass than expensive, but discounted used glass. Some food for thought. Just thinking aloud.

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    Quote Originally Posted by sfhuang
    bro I don't feel the breeze leh ...


    ... cos I have my glasses on.
    sfhuang tert

    Getting your monthly fix huh... my dearest whipping boy. Perhaps because your lens is Nikon? [apologies: private joke]

    Mongoose: It cost me 60 dollars to do a general cleaning on my 28-135mm just a couple of days back...

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