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Thread: temptation

  1. #1

    Default temptation



    Taken with Canon 50mm f1.8. Body : 500D

    1. in what area is critique to be sought?
    Composition, emotion conveyed, color, PQ etc.
    2. what one hopes to achieve with the piece of work?
    "Temptation". Who can refuse a Choc Fudge?
    3. under what circumstance is the picture taken? (physical conditions/emotions)
    Outdoor, hungry,
    4. what the critique seeker personally thinks of the picture
    It is tempting. Cute. Good focus (I think). Nice OOF background

  2. #2

    Default Re: temptation

    why is there a '' after the 'Nice OOF background'??

    the only major gripe i have with this pic is the wb. temperature's too high.

    composition and focus is very nice. a like the little droplets of condensation on the cup. gives it a nice cooling feel.

    can be better if there's some actual ice cream around it or sth..currently the only 'tempting' thing about it is the water condensation. esp if i see this pic on a hot day.

  3. #3
    Member Rendell's Avatar
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    Default Re: temptation

    Composition

    1. From viewer stand point, it isn't that tempting because of the mess in the foreground.

    2. The focus is diverge due the spill, instead of the ice cream tub. It is more like a aftermath instead of a tempting image.

    3. Try focusing on the water droplets on the tub instead and crop away the spill.

    4. The tilt is not ok here because it will make people image the spill flowing to the right ... which is .... dirty.

    Anyway, still a brave try on still image.

  4. #4
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    Default Re: temptation

    1) The canted angle, colour tint, and the textured ground, makes it a moody picture.

    2) Didn't work for me. It feels more like the previous owner of the ice cream abandoned it.

    Suggestion: Try a more high key composition.

    Quote Originally Posted by tngnh View Post


    Taken with Canon 50mm f1.8. Body : 500D

    1. in what area is critique to be sought?
    Composition, emotion conveyed, color, PQ etc.
    2. what one hopes to achieve with the piece of work?
    "Temptation". Who can refuse a Choc Fudge?
    3. under what circumstance is the picture taken? (physical conditions/emotions)
    Outdoor, hungry,
    4. what the critique seeker personally thinks of the picture
    It is tempting. Cute. Good focus (I think). Nice OOF background

  5. #5

    Default Re: temptation

    Hi, a couple of the issues have already been noted, the splilled ice cream ( particularly around the bottom of the tub), the focus is just off (on the foreground pools) - one of the main things though is that it feels haphazard like you were just practising kinda like "hey I'm eating some ice cream and I've got my new toy, let's try maximum apature..." this is because of the setting and all the distractions like the mobile phone. To sell some on the ice cream using the product in the shot, a brighter set would have worked better. Keep at it!
    In every photograph there are at least two people, the viewer and the photographer. (Ansel Adams)

  6. #6

    Default Re: temptation

    I think the white balance is just fine. in fact its great.
    someone commented that its 'dirty'. well, i like it that it feels 'dirty'.
    perhaps, with the cantation, cellphone on the ground, it looks more like a crime scene to me.
    very much like a shot that you see on CSI. its rough, dirty and gritty. i like it.

  7. #7

    Default Re: temptation

    I think it'd have been nice if the drops were in focus. Maybe a spoon would have been a nice addition? the vapour around the ice cream would be nice too. i like the colours though

  8. #8

    Default Re: temptation

    add in a spoon and someone else will comment that its 'too much detail', or 'try another angle' or 'try high key composition' blah blah blah. my opinion is that everyone is always so focused on the technicalities of the photo e.g. exposure, angle, light, whatever, that no one seems to spend time to interpret the story of the photo. (or at least imagine one.)
    taking another look at the photo again, try intepreting it as a crime scene.
    ice cream tub and cellphone got into a struggle. cellphone stabbed ice cream tub. ice cream tub bled 'ice-cream'.
    only thing missing in the photo is the numbered cards that the crime scene investigators place next to each piece of evidence.
    or better yet: someone crossing the street eating his tub of ice cream. its late, light is dim, he's walking home. a drunk driver ran him over and sped off; hit and run. the impact was so great, his cellphone flung out of his pocket, landing on the ground. he's bleeding profusely, his head slumped at an awkward angle(as in the photo), paralyzed, unable to move. his cellphone rings. its his wife. its late, and she hasn't heard from him. she's worried. he would always call if he was late. he wants to answer, but he can't move. breathing is difficult. he can't reach. he can't tell her his last words. his last image of the living is this tub of ben & jerry's and his world darkens for the last time.

  9. #9

    Default Re: temptation

    Quote Originally Posted by jaredng View Post
    add in a spoon and someone else will comment that its 'too much detail', or 'try another angle' or 'try high key composition' blah blah blah. my opinion is that everyone is always so focused on the technicalities of the photo e.g. exposure, angle, light, whatever, that no one seems to spend time to interpret the story of the photo. (or at least imagine one.)
    taking another look at the photo again, try intepreting it as a crime scene.
    ice cream tub and cellphone got into a struggle. cellphone stabbed ice cream tub. ice cream tub bled 'ice-cream'.
    only thing missing in the photo is the numbered cards that the crime scene investigators place next to each piece of evidence.
    or better yet: someone crossing the street eating his tub of ice cream. its late, light is dim, he's walking home. a drunk driver ran him over and sped off; hit and run. the impact was so great, his cellphone flung out of his pocket, landing on the ground. he's bleeding profusely, his head slumped at an awkward angle(as in the photo), paralyzed, unable to move. his cellphone rings. its his wife. its late, and she hasn't heard from him. she's worried. he would always call if he was late. he wants to answer, but he can't move. breathing is difficult. he can't reach. he can't tell her his last words. his last image of the living is this tub of ben & jerry's and his world darkens for the last time.
    sorry man. but i think most of us are being specific to the title temptation. the story you gave could work but it doesn't go in line with the photographer's intention as he stated in point 2.

  10. #10

    Default Re: temptation

    i disagree.

  11. #11

    Default Re: temptation

    one important point most beginners missed out is...using words from the picture to force view to read and interpret, it is just the opposite of a picture speaks a thousand words.

    I'd take this picture similar to those poster, one year's ago, showing a fugitive photo, with words like...WANTED, whoever see this person, please call...

    Always view your picture objectively...like it is a work of somebody else, then scrutinize it, sort of fault finding, look out for flaws. Then think...how to improve, not asking viewer to think like what you are thinking. Everyone has got his/hers own standard of appreciation of good and bad pictures/ movies/ music/ play/ art/ painting etc.

    Most beginners prefers to fall for...I like this picture because of this and that...basically your or mine pictures are meant for others to decide good or bad, whether it is a school project, assignment, submitting in a photo competition, do it for client, for friends or boss, the other party has always got the final say.

  12. #12
    Member Expat yorkshire's Avatar
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    Default Re: temptation

    I find the OOF object in the background distracting ..... it looking like a remote control .

  13. #13

    Default Re: temptation

    Hi all. Thanks for taking the effort to critique. It is really helpful. Appreciate all your comments.

  14. #14

    Default Re: temptation

    Quote Originally Posted by jaredng View Post
    add in a spoon and someone else will comment that its 'too much detail', or 'try another angle' or 'try high key composition' blah blah blah. my opinion is that everyone is always so focused on the technicalities of the photo e.g. exposure, angle, light, whatever, that no one seems to spend time to interpret the story of the photo. (or at least imagine one.)
    taking another look at the photo again, try intepreting it as a crime scene.
    ice cream tub and cellphone got into a struggle. cellphone stabbed ice cream tub. ice cream tub bled 'ice-cream'.
    only thing missing in the photo is the numbered cards that the crime scene investigators place next to each piece of evidence.
    or better yet: someone crossing the street eating his tub of ice cream. its late, light is dim, he's walking home. a drunk driver ran him over and sped off; hit and run. the impact was so great, his cellphone flung out of his pocket, landing on the ground. he's bleeding profusely, his head slumped at an awkward angle(as in the photo), paralyzed, unable to move. his cellphone rings. its his wife. its late, and she hasn't heard from him. she's worried. he would always call if he was late. he wants to answer, but he can't move. breathing is difficult. he can't reach. he can't tell her his last words. his last image of the living is this tub of ben & jerry's and his world darkens for the last time.
    Very imaginative. :-) Good to use some before firing away.

  15. #15

    Default Re: temptation

    watched too many CSI ?

    Quote Originally Posted by jaredng View Post
    add in a spoon and someone else will comment that its 'too much detail', or 'try another angle' or 'try high key composition' blah blah blah. my opinion is that everyone is always so focused on the technicalities of the photo e.g. exposure, angle, light, whatever, that no one seems to spend time to interpret the story of the photo. (or at least imagine one.)
    taking another look at the photo again, try intepreting it as a crime scene.
    ice cream tub and cellphone got into a struggle. cellphone stabbed ice cream tub. ice cream tub bled 'ice-cream'.
    only thing missing in the photo is the numbered cards that the crime scene investigators place next to each piece of evidence.
    or better yet: someone crossing the street eating his tub of ice cream. its late, light is dim, he's walking home. a drunk driver ran him over and sped off; hit and run. the impact was so great, his cellphone flung out of his pocket, landing on the ground. he's bleeding profusely, his head slumped at an awkward angle(as in the photo), paralyzed, unable to move. his cellphone rings. its his wife. its late, and she hasn't heard from him. she's worried. he would always call if he was late. he wants to answer, but he can't move. breathing is difficult. he can't reach. he can't tell her his last words. his last image of the living is this tub of ben & jerry's and his world darkens for the last time.

  16. #16

    Default Re: temptation

    tempting really. firer watch ur front
    not to impress but shoot to express

  17. #17

    Default Re: temptation

    Quote Originally Posted by hobby View Post
    Hi, a couple of the issues have already been noted, the splilled ice cream ( particularly around the bottom of the tub), the focus is just off (on the foreground pools) - one of the main things though is that it feels haphazard like you were just practising kinda like "hey I'm eating some ice cream and I've got my new toy, let's try maximum apature..." this is because of the setting and all the distractions like the mobile phone. To sell some on the ice cream using the product in the shot, a brighter set would have worked better. Keep at it!
    Sorry to borrow your comments, but this photograph does communicate exactly that sort of emotion which you just mentioned. I think I am not the only one who can picture him gulping down the whole carton, then slam the carton on the floor resulting in a few drops that bounced out. He then reaches for his camera and took the shot. I like this photo because of it, I think it works quite well is this aspect. It has that type of energy that is very anti-establishment (not sure if its intentional or just happened this way?)

    Right now it looks a bit like an advertisement. If you intend to create an 'ad-looking' photo, the concept has to be tighter. Meaning what is behind and out of focus had better be clever and witty, and maybe even funny or unexpected. If this is not your intention then perhaps you might want to get creative with different angles/ ice cream cartons so that the branding of ice cream is not so in your face.

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