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Thread: Exposure Bias

  1. #1
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    Default Exposure Bias

    Could anyone tell me how to control the EV?
    When I set to +0.3EV, it gets proper exposure of subject, but part of the bright subject becomes over-exposed!

    How do I produce an evenly exposed shot. For example, how to get a good exposure for this one:
    http://www.pbase.com/image/25408543

    Thanks in advance.
    Last edited by LifeWorld; 24th January 2004 at 08:01 PM.

  2. #2

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    Quote Originally Posted by LifeWorld
    Could anyone tell me how to control the EV?
    When I set to +0.3EV, it gets proper exposure of subject, but part of the bright subject becomes over-exposed!

    How do I produce an evenly exposed shot. For example, how to get a good exposure for this one:
    http://www.pbase.com/image/25359528&exif=Y

    Thanks in advance.
    Hi LifeWorld, the image in the URL provides a very tricky situation where almost 80% of the image are bright and white. The contrast is big. This will fool the camera meter into under exposed the photo. It depend on what detail you want to preserve.

    Normally what I will do is to spot meter the mid-gray area (e.g. the brick wall at the river bank) This will washout the bright area of the building with the flag but will provide an accurate exposure for the foreground building near the river.


    Another method is to wait for a good timing where all buildings are evenly well lit by the sun.

    The EV value IMO does not work well in this situation since the subject has a very big contrast. I still prefer spot metering in this type of situation.

    I will use EV control in an evenly lit subject to control the detail I want to see.

    these are my opinion only, you can try experiment yourself since you won't need pay extra using digital film.

  3. #3
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    Thank you, jimtong.

    Will try to use spot metering in such situation for future shot.

  4. #4

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    how bout using photoshop? hehehe.....


  5. #5

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    hi lifeworld, you can also see which area of the photo is of highest importance to you, ie exposure for that area must be perfect, then spot meter that area and adjust accordingly. cuz sometimes you spot meter a mid grey tone area of the pic but the impt area lies far outside +- 2 stops and becomes too over or underexposed.

  6. #6
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    Thank you. Guess the photo now depends on one's judgement and decision. Quite tough, but will try.

  7. #7

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    The best solution is to wait for ideal lighting situation, either in the morning or around sunset. Then you can avoid such high contrast altogether.

    Alternatively, if your camera has RAW mode, shoot using that and expose for the highlights (so there is no burnout). Then create 2 jpg files from whatever software you use to process RAW, one with the original photo and one with the exposure increased as needed to bring out the detail in the darker areas. Then combine the 2 images in photoshop - use the first photo for the light area and the second for the darker areas. If you have a tripod handy (in this instance looks like you were on a boat, so wouldn't have worked), take 2 shots, one spot meter on the highlights and the second on the darker areas and merge in PhotoShop. If this sounds too tricky (and it can be very time consuming), then return to the best solution!

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