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Thread: Please help a newbie!!!

  1. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by Andy Ho
    I guess we should all practice a higher level of discipline when it comes to taking care of our equiptments. I really admire those who took good care of their lenses and cameras like as if it is part of their religion.

    I once know someone who wrap all his lenses (individually) with cloth when he comes out shooting, even his camera. It is like a ritual to him but I wish I had that luxury of time to slowly unwrap the lenses each time before I change lens on my camera.

    Andy Ho
    Hey Andy,
    When you mentioned the way the person wraps his individual lenses, it reminds me of the Mercedes Benz commericial - the man using a small toothbrush and painstakingly brush carefully his Benz's wheels?

    Usually in these cases, the euqipment owns the owner, not the other way round.

    Just my two cents worth, if people go to such extends to take care of their equipment, they really shouldn't buy it even in the first place. Personally thinking, it takes the fun out of things.

    Just my opinion...

    Regards,
    -Michelle-

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by mich_2103
    Hey Andy,
    When you mentioned the way the person wraps his individual lenses, it reminds me of the Mercedes Benz commericial - the man using a small toothbrush and painstakingly brush carefully his Benz's wheels?

    Usually in these cases, the euqipment owns the owner, not the other way round.

    Just my two cents worth, if people go to such extends to take care of their equipment, they really shouldn't buy it even in the first place. Personally thinking, it takes the fun out of things.

    Just my opinion...

    Regards,
    -Michelle-



    Andy Ho

  3. #23
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    Default wet lens!!!

    so how can we actually dry our lens?? by ????using a lens paper or is there any trick to it...hehehe...??

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by roosevelt
    so how can we actually dry our lens?? by ????using a lens paper or is there any trick to it...hehehe...??
    normally one tries his/her darndest to keep their equipment dry. but on the unfortunate occasions where a bit of water gets through, this is what i usually do...

    - dry lens with lens cloth and clean front and rear element with lens cloth or lense tissue. i try to make it a point not to wipe a "dry" lens, always use some lens cleaning solution with the tissue.

    - if the sun is out, i leave my lens on the window sill for a few hours, letting the sun dry it out. if there's no sun, you can use a hot lamp to dry the unit.

    hope this helps.

    btw, most camera gear, specially the older ones, are pretty hardy and robust. some can take quite a beating before they die. so don't worry so much about keeping everything in bubble wrap until you want to use. just use some common sense and a bit of caution when with your gear.
    Today is a gift; that's why it's called the present.
    The toys

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by patch17
    normally one tries his/her darndest to keep their equipment dry. but on the unfortunate occasions where a bit of water gets through, this is what i usually do...

    - dry lens with lens cloth and clean front and rear element with lens cloth or lense tissue. i try to make it a point not to wipe a "dry" lens, always use some lens cleaning solution with the tissue.

    - if the sun is out, i leave my lens on the window sill for a few hours, letting the sun dry it out. if there's no sun, you can use a hot lamp to dry the unit.

    hope this helps.

    btw, most camera gear, specially the older ones, are pretty hardy and robust. some can take quite a beating before they die. so don't worry so much about keeping everything in bubble wrap until you want to use. just use some common sense and a bit of caution when with your gear.

    thanx for ur advice!!!!alway thought that u cun leave the lens in the sun cos later there will be white patches???

  6. #26
    Member patch17's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by roosevelt
    thanx for ur advice!!!!alway thought that u cun leave the lens in the sun cos later there will be white patches???
    ummm... what gave you that idea?
    Today is a gift; that's why it's called the present.
    The toys

  7. #27

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    Quote Originally Posted by roosevelt
    so how can we actually dry our lens?? by ????using a lens paper or is there any trick to it...hehehe...??
    Hi,
    I agree with what patch17 mentioned - just use some common sense because sometimes I see the way certain students take care of our school's equipment, I can almost feel the "pain" for the equipment and at the same time, I feel like slapping those people.

    Always put a small clean towel in your camera bag because it helps you to protect your camera outdoors if there is a rain. My FM2 + several lenses can withstand very slight drizzle but if it gets heavier, I'll keep them away.

    This works for me and my FM2 so not sure for the other people.

    If a few drops of rain gets onto my equipment, usually I'll immediately air them by putting them in my dry cabinet and let them do the job.

    But if the rain is rather heavy, believe it or not, I actually use a hair-dryer. But of course, you point the hair-dryer at least a distance away. It actually prevents my lens from getting fogged up.

    All these, is just for rain.

    If the moisture happens to be sea water, then the trouble gets trickier because the salt content can rust your camera and lens. If that happens, whether the condition is serious or not, leave it to the hands of the specialist. Once the sea water gets into contact with your gear, get your equipment repaired/serviced ASAP.

    FYI, because of Singapore's humid weather, if sea water gets into contact with your gear, the rust can occur as fast as within 4 days. My friend, who happens to be a free-lance camera repairer told me this fact.

    Regards,
    -Michelle-

  8. #28
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    Default where?

    Quote Originally Posted by mich_2103
    Hi,
    I agree with what patch17 mentioned - just use some common sense because sometimes I see the way certain students take care of our school's equipment, I can almost feel the "pain" for the equipment and at the same time, I feel like slapping those people.

    Always put a small clean towel in your camera bag because it helps you to protect your camera outdoors if there is a rain. My FM2 + several lenses can withstand very slight drizzle but if it gets heavier, I'll keep them away.

    This works for me and my FM2 so not sure for the other people.

    If a few drops of rain gets onto my equipment, usually I'll immediately air them by putting them in my dry cabinet and let them do the job.

    But if the rain is rather heavy, believe it or not, I actually use a hair-dryer. But of course, you point the hair-dryer at least a distance away. It actually prevents my lens from getting fogged up.

    All these, is just for rain.

    If the moisture happens to be sea water, then the trouble gets trickier because the salt content can rust your camera and lens. If that happens, whether the condition is serious or not, leave it to the hands of the specialist. Once the sea water gets into contact with your gear, get your equipment repaired/serviced ASAP.

    FYI, because of Singapore's humid weather, if sea water gets into contact with your gear, the rust can occur as fast as within 4 days. My friend, who happens to be a free-lance camera repairer told me this fact.

    Regards,
    -Michelle-
    i really learn alot...of maintaining equipment...thanx alot....by the way...u got any idea where can i bring it to if the seawater got in??

  9. #29

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    Hi roosevelt,
    Read quite a number of your threads recently in CS. Hope you are learning loads from the pros here. Actually I learned some stuff from your thread too...

    Regarding about your question, it depends which brand of camera you used. I used a FM2 so if anything happens to my precious (TOUCH WOOD!!!), I go back to Shiriro House, which is like the headquarters and main distributor of Nikon cameras. Compared with private shops like TCW/P & G/Alex Photo/Camera Hospital and pending on the severity of your problem, Shiriro charges like 1.5 times more than those private shops.

    But I have a reason for choosing Shiriro as my choice. Perhaps I have heard too much or I am being a stereotype but sometimes, it pays to be a bit more safe.

    Heard this from a senior photographer, who is now a free-lancer for Straits Times.

    He says in the past, some camera repair shops play dirty. They sometimes replace your camera parts, e.g., the shutter with other inferior ones. So supposed you bring your camera for some cleaning only, they replace all your good camera parts with other inferior products. And since we are not professionals, we can't tell the difference apart and will most likely never know.

    So by going to Shiriro, I pay slightly more for confidence and gurantee.

    That's just my 2 cents worth.

    Regards,
    -Michelle-

  10. #30
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    Default repair...

    Quote Originally Posted by mich_2103
    Hi roosevelt,
    Read quite a number of your threads recently in CS. Hope you are learning loads from the pros here. Actually I learned some stuff from your thread too...

    Regarding about your question, it depends which brand of camera you used. I used a FM2 so if anything happens to my precious (TOUCH WOOD!!!), I go back to Shiriro House, which is like the headquarters and main distributor of Nikon cameras. Compared with private shops like TCW/P & G/Alex Photo/Camera Hospital and pending on the severity of your problem, Shiriro charges like 1.5 times more than those private shops.

    But I have a reason for choosing Shiriro as my choice. Perhaps I have heard too much or I am being a stereotype but sometimes, it pays to be a bit more safe.

    Heard this from a senior photographer, who is now a free-lancer for Straits Times.

    He says in the past, some camera repair shops play dirty. They sometimes replace your camera parts, e.g., the shutter with other inferior ones. So supposed you bring your camera for some cleaning only, they replace all your good camera parts with other inferior products. And since we are not professionals, we can't tell the difference apart and will most likely never know.

    So by going to Shiriro, I pay slightly more for confidence and gurantee.

    That's just my 2 cents worth.

    Regards,
    -Michelle-

    hihi...
    wow...thanx for replying me!!!!me too learn alot alot from u!!!hahaha...maybe u can tell me where is it located at...so in future if i need it...i will have the address...hahaa....thanx!!!

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