Results 1 to 2 of 2

Thread: Tips for Interior Photography? - on Slides

  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    Under your skin
    Posts
    533

    Default Tips for Interior Photography? - on Slides

    Tried taking some shots of my friend's apartment last month - on slides. It was terrible. Tragically under exposed with overexposed spots(lights). All of 'em.

    Didn't have a tripod with me, but didn't use flash as i wanted to capture the mood created with the available lighting.

    Any websites? Tips? Equipment to lug along?

    Used EliteChrome 100.

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    Singapore
    Posts
    2,464

    Default Re: Tips for Interior Photography? - on Slides

    Originally posted by rochkoh
    Tried taking some shots of my friend's apartment last month - on slides. It was terrible. Tragically under exposed with overexposed spots(lights). All of 'em.

    Didn't have a tripod with me, but didn't use flash as i wanted to capture the mood created with the available lighting.

    Any websites? Tips? Equipment to lug along?

    Used EliteChrome 100.
    you shot Elitechrome 100 indoors without tripod? enough shutter speed?

    anyway I don't think much additional equipment is the issue here (unless you get a tilt and shift lens to correct perspectives - that would probably be the "correct" way to do such shoots )

    maybe the only additional equipment I would recommend is a tripod and maybe a couple of flashes. When used correctly, flash will NOT ruin the natural lighting, but will instead help to cut down the contrast of the scene and fill up the shadow areas. Good control of a multiple flash setup and good positioning of the lights is key to a natural looking photo. Esp since you're shooting in the rather confined space of an apartment, not a concert hall, or church interior, flash is quite a practical proposition.

    while i'm not an expert in this kind of shoot, I would venture to guess that the spotlights fooled your meter into underexposing. A spotmeter of some kind would be useful in determining the range of bright and dark areas and helping you to decide wat to expose for. What you want is to expose for the important parts of the house.

    Also need to ask yourself if it is really necessary to include the ceiling spotlights.

    If your camera doesn't have a spotmeter, and u're using an EOS system, put your camera on evaluative (and preferably partial meter as well), select the centre focus point, and point at the dark and light areas to get ballpark figures for exposure of those areas. If u're using other systems, you gotta find out how to do that.

    My own limited experience which might illustrate my point: I shot Elitechrome 100 of the mostly spotlit main auditorium of the NUS cultural centre 3 weeks ago. Normally I would have used my D30, with the advantage of checking exposure right after I take the shot to confirm if I nailed it correctly. But a full frame 20mm wide angle shot of the very grand concert hall was too good to pass up. (and 20mm on a D30 is not wide enough. hmm this could be a good excuse to get that 16-35L.....)

    I discovered that letting the camera make metering decisions gave readings that were pretty far off from the correct exposure. The areas of contrasting light and dark areas (dark corridors and isles and brightly lit seating areas) made it difficult to decide on a correct exposure. Spot metering the textured floor and seats gave readings that were very different from merely using evaluative at the general scene of the hall.

    In the end, I decided to meter for the seats and floor and let the highlights blow out a bit. The exposure of f8 8 seconds turn out well. Detail was seen in every shadow area, and the highlight areas don't bother too much. (after all do u really need to see detail in a spotlight?)

    Metering for the general scene would have underexposed the entire image, resulting in an image with the floor and chairs too dark to discern anything.

    hope tat helps....
    David Teo
    View my work and blog at http://www.5stonesphoto.com/blog

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •