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Thread: 5 Random Questions

  1. #1
    PandoraLydia
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    Default 5 Random Questions

    1) What is meant by/the difference between Photolamp (3400K) and Tungsten (3200K)? (besides the obvious difference in Kelvin temperature) what is considered photolamp?

    2)Does anyone know what the ISO setting (for tungsten lights) is using Kodak Ultra ISO 400 film? I checked the Kodak website and didn't find the answer.

    3)Also, I recently used Kodak HIE film pushed to an ISO setting of 400 and shot under incandescent lights using my Canon speedlite 200E flash and a red filter (#25 I believe) and I got a strange effect. The model I photographed was wearing a black velvet skirt and the skirt came out a shiny WHITE color. No other object on the film came out this way either. Has anyone had this experience? Can anyone explain this?

    4) Has anyone used expired 35 mm film? If the film truly is damaged, what sort of results should I expect? (I'm asking in regard to expired slide film and color negative film )

    5) I plan on experimenting with a bunch of colored light bulbs along with a black light in front of either a white or black backdrop. What speed film should i use? anyone have any tips regarding aperture/shutter settings?

    Thanks to anyone who responds. I appreciate it.

  2. #2

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    Quote Originally Posted by PandoraLydia
    1) What is meant by/the difference between Photolamp (3400K) and Tungsten (3200K)? (besides the obvious difference in Kelvin temperature) what is considered photolamp?
    I don't know exactly what you're looking for in this qn, but a light source with a higher Kelvin temperature means it is more "white". So in this case a photolamp should exhibit a slightly "whiter" (a shift towards being blue, or more "cool") colour than the tungsten lamp.

    The spectrum described by the Kelvin scale goes from reddish (low Kelvin temperature) to bluish (high Kelvin temperature).

    2)Does anyone know what the ISO setting (for tungsten lights) is using Kodak Ultra ISO 400 film? I checked the Kodak website and didn't find the answer.
    I've not used the Kodak Ultra series of film before (is it sold here?) so I don't know precisely what you're asking. The rated EI for the film is ISO 400, meaning you should use it as an ISO 400 film...and set your exposure settings according to that. If you use it as any other EI then you are trying intending to underexposure or overexposure all your shots in the roll.

    I don't know if Kodak Ultra is tungsten-corrected, otherwise you'll need to use a filter to colour-correct the yellowish cast if that's not the intended effect.

    3)Also, I recently used Kodak HIE film pushed to an ISO setting of 400 and shot under incandescent lights using my Canon speedlite 200E flash and a red filter (#25 I believe) and I got a strange effect. The model I photographed was wearing a black velvet skirt and the skirt came out a shiny WHITE color. No other object on the film came out this way either. Has anyone had this experience? Can anyone explain this?
    Again I have not used Kodak HIE films, not photographed velvet. However from my day-to-day experience encountered with velvet this material sometimes do exhibit some reflective properties under strong light. Your model's black velvet skirt may have fooled the camera's metering to think that the scene is too dark and hence over-compensated the exposure.

    4) Has anyone used expired 35 mm film? If the film truly is damaged, what sort of results should I expect? (I'm asking in regard to expired slide film and color negative film )
    From what I understand, the most pronouced effect of expired film is colour shifts, and dull colours.

    5) I plan on experimenting with a bunch of colored light bulbs along with a black light in front of either a white or black backdrop. What speed film should i use? anyone have any tips regarding aperture/shutter settings?
    "Black light" as in UV flourscent tubes? For film speed it depends on your situation; if the scene is relatively static and you don't mind any starburst effect from point-light sources like spotlights then you can use slow film for fine grain. Just lengthen your shutter speed accordingly. Otherwise a fast film is good in capturing ambience lighting without blowouts.

    I don't know how much UV light a UV filter will cut out...anyone with experience with UV photography?

    Thanks to anyone who responds. I appreciate it.
    All the above I'm speaking from personal experience with a bit of hypothesis here and there. So if I'm wrong anyone please feel free to correct me.

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