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Thread: Why smoking is bad.

  1. #41

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    i remembered a joke when the MO in my camp briefed the entire battalion on the bad points of smoking , tryin to encourage the smokers to quit. But when he asked how many soldiers got IPPT gold, majority are smokers. Got one fella quite fit can do SOC run down under 7 or 8min i forgot is a heavy smoker too.

    im not encouraging people to smoke lar. Neither do i mind others around me to smoke. Maybe for a start to quite can try those nicotine filters i dun know. It does takes courage to quit smoking so lets cheer those made the decision to quit smoking.

  2. #42
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    For those who sufferes from Back Pain

    THE SPINE AND CIGARETTE SMOKING

    Bone is a living tissue dependent on the functions and support provided by the other body systems. When these systems are not able to perform normally, bone is unable to rebuild itself. The formation of bone is particularly influenced by physical exercise and hormonal activity, both of which are adversely affected by cigarette smoking.

    Many smokers have less physical endurance than nonsmokers, mainly due to decreased lung function. Cigarette smoking reduces the amount of oxygen in the blood and increases the level of harmful substances, such as carbon monoxide. This, combined with the effects of smoking on the heart and blood vessels, can limit the benefits from physical activity.

    In men and women, cigarette smoking is known to influence hormone function. Smoking increases estrogen loss in women who are perimenopausal or postmenopausal. This can result in a loss of bone density and lead to osteoporosis. Osteoporosis causes bones to lose strength, becoming more fragile. This silent disease is responsible for many spine and hip fractures in the United States.

    SPINAL FUSION AND CIGARETTE SMOKING

    Spinal Fusion

    Defined Spinal fusion is a surgical procedure used to join bony segments of the spine (e.g. vertebrae). In order for the fusion to heal, new bone growth must occur, bridging between the spinal segments. Sometimes fusion is combined with another surgical technique termed spinal instrumentation. Instrumentation consists of different types of medically designed hardware such as rods, hooks, wires, and screws that are attached to the spine. These devices provide immediate stability and hold the spine in proper position while the fusion heals.

    Spinal fusion (also termed arthrodesis) can be performed at the cervical, thoracic, or lumbar levels of the spine. It takes months to heal. Your doctor may order post-operative radiographs (x-rays) to monitor the progress of this healing.

    The long-term success of many types of spinal surgery is dependent upon successful spinal fusion. In fact, if the fusion does not heal, spinal surgery may have to be repeated. A failed fusion is termed a nonunion or pseudoarthrosis. Spinal instrumentation, although very strong, may even break if nonunion occurs. Needless to say, spine surgeons try to minimize the risk of this happening.

    Cigarette Smoking and Failed Fusion

    Certain factors have been found to affect the success of spinal fusion. Some of these factors include the patient's age, underlying medical conditions (e.g. diabetes, osteoporosis), and cigarette smoking. There is growing evidence that cigarette smoking adversely affects fusion. Smoking disrupts the normal function of basic body systems that contribute to bone formation and growth. As mentioned previously, new bone growth is necessary for a fusion to heal.

    Research has demonstrated that habitual cigarette smoking leads to the breakdown of the spine to such a degree that fusion is often less successful when compared to similar procedures performed on non-smokers. In a study of patients undergoing anterior cervical fusion (fusion of the neck), it was observed that smokers had an increased rate of nonunion (up to 47%) as compared to non-smokers.1

    Another study evaluated tobacco use in patients who underwent lumbar (low back) fusion. The patients who smoked had failed fusions in up to 40% of cases, compared to only 8% among non-smokers.2 Similar findings have been reported in other studies as well.

    Post-Operative Infection

    Cigarette smoking compromises the immune system and the body's other defense mechanisms, which can increase the patient's susceptibility to post-operative infection. A study conducted by Thalgott et al showed that cigarette smoking was a risk factor for infection following spinal fusion.3

    CONCLUSION

    Clearly, cigarette smoking is detrimental to spinal fusion. People who are facing fusion or any spinal surgery should make every effort to stop smoking. Quitting the habit beforehand will decrease the associated risks and increase the likelihood of a successful spinal fusion surgery.

    Your physician recognizes the importance of smoking cessation and can provide information about available treatment options.

    Full article can be found here

    Unfortunately i am one of those person that has a Lumbar Herniated Disc, due to a gym injury and prevalent prolapsed disk, i am currently only 60% of what i was, and after more than a year since the spinal surgery i am still ladened with pain and on-going physical therapy.

    Please do think about your health and future. most importantly your loved ones.

    Sincerely yours
    waisj
    Last edited by waisj; 16th January 2004 at 07:39 PM.

  3. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by renegade
    More reads while we huff n puff ...

    http://www.therockalltimes.co.uk/200...king-good.html
    http://www.zug.com/scrawl/smoking/

    Just got my blood test result ... doc says everything is okay ... EXCEPT ... I'm lack of nicotine ... ok ... puff puff
    Man you really hardcore....... since wat years you have been smoking? there was once i quit for 2 months +, wa gain weight and my face looks a little round.... wait cannot fit my black helmet........

  4. #44

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    well, jedi rodes are better, you can eat all you want and the robes are loose enough to keep you covered.

    or so you know, you were once a jedi.

    if so, built a biggeeeeeeeeer armour darth. XXL one.

  5. #45

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    Quote Originally Posted by renegade
    More reads while we huff n puff ...

    http://www.therockalltimes.co.uk/200...king-good.html
    http://www.zug.com/scrawl/smoking/

    Just got my blood test result ... doc says everything is okay ... EXCEPT ... I'm lack of nicotine ... ok ... puff puff

    Gosh renegade....

  6. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by Belle&Sebastain
    well, jedi rodes are better, you can eat all you want and the robes are loose enough to keep you covered.

    or so you know, you were once a jedi.

    if so, built a biggeeeeeeeeer armour darth. XXL one.
    With the 2ND DEATH* destroyed there is not enuf budget for another one not to mention another fireman helmet.....

  7. #47
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    i think the best motivation to quit any kind of bad habit is love.
    i juz quitted something that i had problem with quitting for the past 9 years all because of that special someone. Been guilt free for 3 months now and counting.

  8. #48
    ClubSNAP Idol Adam Goi's Avatar
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    "Because Stone Cold said so?"

  9. #49

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    Quote Originally Posted by MeNaCeWu
    rather true that it is their life but i feel that they are just being selfish sometimes by not thinking abt how they are actually bringing harm indirectly to the people near them
    Bingo ! Exactly. When the smokers are well, their smoking annoys and even threatens the health of those around them, esp babies.

    When they get sick from smoking, their loved ones worry and suffer and have to spend tons of money trying to cure them. I'm speaking from experience here. My dear old Dad smoked for 40 years, and developed lung cancer. We spent tens of thousands of dollars trying to cure him. And his last few months was painful for himself and for those around him, as we saw him slowly wasting away, till he couldn't even walk. All this while, he was still mentally aware, but physically unable to do anything. Like a prisoner in his own body. Smokers, think about it : Is it worth it ? The pain you bring to everyone, and the money they would have to spend on you, money that could be used for retirement or for education of their children.

    He never thought that this would happen to him, and so ignored pleas from my mom to stop smoking. His father ( ie, my grandfather ) was a heavy smoker too, and lived to 89 ! So he always felt a false sense of security from that. Sigh... too bad he himself was not so lucky.

  10. #50

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    Quote Originally Posted by RuthBaby
    i work with smokers... my clients smokes, my colleagues smokes... fark... so if i dun smoke.. i take in 2nd hand smoke.. which is more deadly... why not i smoke too?
    so lame sia
    That's just an excuse. I work with smokers too, and some of my clients smoke too. But I don't. Just don't join them for a smoking break. Meet your clients when they are not in a smoking session. Bring some candy and suck on those instead. Yes, there's second hand smoke, but it's only a little if you stand in the correct place relative to the wind direction.

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