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Thread: Some pics for comment.

  1. #1
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    Default Some pics for comment.

    Hi people, I'm still brushing up on my photography skills after I bought my Canon 300D last month. 3 pics below for comments .

    1 night landscape shot, and 2 macro shots (perhaps not macro enough )


    Fullerton Hotel.
    Canon 300D /w 18-55mm, Tripod, F/11, 0.8 sec, ISO 400.


    Red lotus at Sundial, Botanic Gardens.
    Canon 300D /w 100mm f2.8 macro USM, Tripod, F/6.3, 1/100 sec, ISO 100.


    Damselfly at Botanic Gardens.
    Canon 300D /w 100mm f2.8 macro USM, Tripod, F/8, 1/8 sec, ISO 100.

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    My personnal feel, do not be irritated:

    First picture:
    Bridge blocking the building

    Second picture:
    Nice, could be better without the lower right object

    Third picture:
    Closer crop, higher shutter would be good as object is blurrish (moving its wings??)



  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by theITguy
    My personnal feel, do not be irritated:

    First picture:
    Bridge blocking the building

    Second picture:
    Nice, could be better without the lower right object

    Third picture:
    Closer crop, higher shutter would be good as object is blurrish (moving its wings??)


    Hi theITguy, thanks for your comments!

    1st pic:
    I think for the Fullerton Hotel, the bridge does not look too bad, the picture taken from the back.

    2nd pic:
    I will be more careful of the background.

    3rd pic:
    I should have gone closer.

  4. #4
    Senior Member Kit's Avatar
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    Your Fullerton suffers from what I called "the floating lights syndrome". The details of the building were lost. For night shots, try shooting earlier in the evening when you still can see the details. If necessary, use multiple exposure and make sure you use a tripod. Other than that, the usual converging lines problem, which I think not much can be done to improve it given the tight composition.

    The second shot..... be careful and check through your viewfinder before pressing the button. The intruding red lotus at the right bottom corner is pretty distracting.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kit
    Your Fullerton suffers from what I called "the floating lights syndrome". The details of the building were lost. For night shots, try shooting earlier in the evening when you still can see the details. If necessary, use multiple exposure and make sure you use a tripod. Other than that, the usual converging lines problem, which I think not much can be done to improve it given the tight composition.

    The second shot..... be careful and check through your viewfinder before pressing the button. The intruding red lotus at the right bottom corner is pretty distracting.
    Hi Kit, what do you mean by multiple exposure (I'm still a newbie )?
    I took multiple shots with a tripod. A longer exposure results in overexposing the lighted areas. Perhaps it is too dark for a good shot? You are right, perhaps I can try again when there are still some light on the skies. I actually came down from Chinatown after the much awaited firecrackers and it is rather late.

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    take it earlier in the evening where there is still some light in the sky to lightup the building. you'll also get a nice dark blue sky (or warm sunset reds if taken during sunset).

  7. #7

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    The first shot is quite a standard angle from which many have taken, nothing seriously wrong except that there is slight keystoning apparent.(converging vertical lines) Try to make sure your lens is level to the subject and not slanted upwards when taking. Shooting earlier in the evening at 7+pm will result in a visible blue sky which might look better depending on your taste.

    For the 2nd and 3rd pics, try to be more careful with your framing and perhaps you might want to adopt the "Rule of thirds" or Golden Ratio in your composition instead of placing the subject dead centre.

  8. #8
    Senior Member Kit's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cheesin
    Hi Kit, what do you mean by multiple exposure (I'm still a newbie )?
    I took multiple shots with a tripod. A longer exposure results in overexposing the lighted areas. Perhaps it is too dark for a good shot? You are right, perhaps I can try again when there are still some light on the skies. I actually came down from Chinatown after the much awaited firecrackers and it is rather late.
    Ok what I usually do is take several readings of different parts of the scene. Of all the readings, choose 2 or even 3 readings. These readings should allow you to record both shadowed and highlighted areas. Jot the readings down. Mount the camera on the tripod and take the shot consecutively using those settings.

    Download theimages to PS(which is what I use) and stack the images on top of the other. Try adjusting the opacity of one of those image so that you end up with an image showing the shadowed area without blowing out the highlights. www.fredmiranda.com sells PS action for digital multiple exposure for around US$15. Can consider that also.

    This process is highly experimental and you might need to take more images in the beginning to make things right but I think its a good process to master.

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    Senior Member Kit's Avatar
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    As for the converging lines problem....... were you using the widest end of your lens? If you were, then there's not much you can do about it except maybe to move back a little. Moving your film plane parallel to the building will straighten the lines but that your building will also end up at the top part of the frame. It might even move out of the frame, screwing up the composition. You don't want that too happen either. A few options you can use to overcome this problem. You can either get a wider angle lens or a shift lens. This will mean you have to spend more good money. Alternatively, try another view. Sometimes you don't have to place the entire building in view to produce good shots. Think simple and move closer. See if there's any part that's worth isolating and zoom in on that. Try going closer and look upwards. The exaggerated converging lines can produce some dynamic compositions. Can try that.

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