Results 1 to 14 of 14

Thread: How to avoid the red-eye.

  1. #1

    Default How to avoid the red-eye.

    Hey Everyone,
    One of the most common problems we faced when taking pictures is the red-eye, and it really irks me a hell lot.

    For digital, I know they have this function for flash where you can fire a series of small flashes before the main flash and by doing this, it helps to reduce the red-eye effect.

    However, I am using an FM2. Is there any trick to use an FM2 with a flash without risking the red-eye? E.g., how to point the flash, what kind of filters should we use etc.

    Please advise. Thanks!

    Regards,
    -Michelle-

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Outside the Dry Box.
    Posts
    16,268

    Default

    just bounce the flash if your flash is an external unit. tilting it 45-90 degree.
    if you dun have external flash unit then... dunno how liao...
    Logging Off. "You have 2,631 messages stored, of a total 400 allowed." don't PM me.

  3. #3
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Northeast
    Posts
    1,226

    Default

    Hi, correct me if I'm wrong, but I think that your flash mustn't be on the same axis as your lens to eliminate redeye if the you don't have the preflash. So if your flash is mounted sufficiently high up on the lens, or use an off camera flash, red eye wouldn't be a problem as the flash wouldn't be reflected directly from the cornea (or whatever it is in the eye tht reflects the flash) back onto the film plane.

  4. #4

    Default

    yupz.

    specifically, there is this acute angle from (1)lens to (2)subject's eye to (3)flash unit.

    the smaller the angle, the more pronounced red eye

  5. #5
    Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    129

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mich_2103
    Hey Everyone,
    One of the most common problems we faced when taking pictures is the red-eye, and it really irks me a hell lot.

    For digital, I know they have this function for flash where you can fire a series of small flashes before the main flash and by doing this, it helps to reduce the red-eye effect.

    However, I am using an FM2. Is there any trick to use an FM2 with a flash without risking the red-eye? E.g., how to point the flash, what kind of filters should we use etc.

    Please advise. Thanks!

    Regards,
    -Michelle-
    there are a couple of tricks... the first is like what the rest have said above... which is to fire the flash at a plane different to that of the lens to prevent the reddish retina from reflecting light back into the lens and getting that ghost-ish look.

    the second.. blind them by firing 2 to three flashes at their eyes... helps the pupils to contract thereby reducing red eye.. then take the photo

  6. #6
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Singapore
    Posts
    334

    Default

    Personally, I find that with an external flash mounted on top of the camera, the flashhead is far enough from the lens to prevent red-eyes most if not all the time. The built in flash of most SLRs are just too close to the lens to prevent red-eyes.

  7. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    Perth Australia
    Posts
    2,548

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mich_2103
    Hey Everyone,
    One of the most common problems we faced when taking pictures is the red-eye, and it really irks me a hell lot.

    However, I am using an FM2. Is there any trick to use an FM2 with a flash without risking the red-eye? E.g., how to point the flash, what kind of filters should we use etc.

    Please advise. Thanks!

    Regards,
    -Michelle-
    Michelle,

    Firstly you need to understand what causes red eye, it's the flash bouncing back from the rear of the eye (retina) and then retransmitting via the iris.

    Red eye will only occur if the angle between the flash, subject and lens is less than 2.5 degrees or so.

    Flash F
    lens ............................ subject

    There are a number of practical solutions to eliminating red eye with the most common being:

    Raising the hight of the flashgun so that the angle is always greater than 2.5 degrees. This also has the added bonus of forcing the shadows down below the subject thus reducing their visibility. This method is used when using flash brackets such as Stroboframes, Seiglite, Newton etc.

    Move the flash to the side to increase the angle. This method is quite popular with wedding photographers using large hammerhead flash units.

    Bounce the flash of the ceiling or wall. This method reduces the effective range of the flash and can lead to shadow problems under chins etc, so it's normally used in conjunction with a fill in reflector (white card/plastic etc) mounted to the flash unit.

    That's a simplified list of ways to deal with red eye when using a manual camera. There are dozens of resources online dealing the how to reduce red eye. Feel free to PM me if you need more specific information about the methods mentioned in this post.
    The Ang Moh from Hell
    Professional Photography - many are called, few are chosen!

  8. #8
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Singapore
    Posts
    984

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Del_CtrlnoAlt
    just bounce the flash if your flash is an external unit. tilting it 45-90 degree.
    if you dun have external flash unit then... dunno how liao...
    he/she has to have an external flash unit. the FM2 does not have a built in flash. maybe you mean a swivel external flash?

  9. #9
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Singapore
    Posts
    984

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mich_2103
    Hey Everyone,
    One of the most common problems we faced when taking pictures is the red-eye, and it really irks me a hell lot.

    For digital, I know they have this function for flash where you can fire a series of small flashes before the main flash and by doing this, it helps to reduce the red-eye effect.

    However, I am using an FM2. Is there any trick to use an FM2 with a flash without risking the red-eye? E.g., how to point the flash, what kind of filters should we use etc.

    Please advise. Thanks!

    Regards,
    -Michelle-
    i agree with the other posts about the angles and the height of the flash above the camera...

    most of the larger flashes in the market should be high enough for you not to experience the problem. but in any case, bouncing the flash is an immediate solution...

    but there would not be a catchlight in the subjects eye... making them look a bit dull.

  10. #10

    Default

    Do also note that a setup that works without redeye at near distances may exhibit the effect if the subject if further away.

  11. #11
    Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    129

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Zerstorer
    Do also note that a setup that works without redeye at near distances may exhibit the effect if the subject if further away.
    I'm sure this reason is corresponding to the fact that the further away you are from the subject's eyes, the smaller the angle the focal plane makes with the flash light to the eyes...

  12. #12

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by fooey
    I'm sure this reason is corresponding to the fact that the further away you are from the subject's eyes, the smaller the angle the focal plane makes with the flash light to the eyes...
    Exactly. In case someone wonders why redeye seems more prevalent at longer distances.

  13. #13

    Default

    Hey All,
    Thanks for your tips and sharing your experiences!

    I'm gonna try and practice my skills using the flash during the upcoming Thaipusam festival. I suck big-time using a flash...

    Oh btw, any recommendations on what kind of films to use for events like Thaipusam?

    Regards,
    -Michelle-

  14. #14

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mich_2103
    Hey All,
    Thanks for your tips and sharing your experiences!

    I'm gonna try and practice my skills using the flash during the upcoming Thaipusam festival. I suck big-time using a flash...

    Oh btw, any recommendations on what kind of films to use for events like Thaipusam?

    Regards,
    -Michelle-
    Ask yourself, if the shoot will be early in the morning before the sun come out? Does it comprises of indoor or outdoor shots?

    Let assume if you are covering a whole day event, the following will be the kind of negative/slide films I personel think might be suitable (Note: I prefer to use Fuji for negative film):

    1. Before the sun raise or indoor shots when the lighting
    condition is very bad/bad - Fuji Press 800 (If required,
    you might need to push the film to achieve ISO 1600)

    2. Day break - Fuji superior 400 or NPH 400 or NPS 160
    (negative film) or
    Provia 100F or Kodak 100VS or Provia 400( slide film).
    Depends on your needs, personelly I find that ISO 400
    film provide you with more versatility.

    Note:
    Different films do have their own characteristics and individual photographers have their own preference.
    For example, I might like the saturated color offered by kodak 100vs and you might hate it, so what I can advise you is to try out those film that you prefer before going for important events.

    What I mentioned are those films which I frequently used (there are many others films in the market which I've not mentioned).

    My 2 cents worth of input.

    Hope that help.
    Last edited by scanner; 14th January 2004 at 02:00 AM.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •