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Thread: Shooting infra-red

  1. #1

    Smile Shooting infra-red

    Harlowz ... i've seen infra-red shots in a few personal galleries such as Big Burd & pschia's:

    http://www.pbase.com/pschia/infra_red
    and
    http://imageevent.com/pico/irworld;j...ga791.rabbit_s

    I tot it was one of sony's cam's features till I saw pschia label his shots as taken on the 10D ... how were they taken huh? can someone enlighten this swaku?

  2. #2
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    First, you would want a infra red filter of an appropriate size to fit on your camera. You would most probably want the Hoya R72 Infra red filter. Secondly just adjust your camera to have extra long exposure. so that you cam capture the infra red since most cameras have infra red filter in front of the sensor so that the sensor doesn't heat up un-necessarily and produce more noise. As for how long the exposure should be, I would say around @ f2.8 @ ISO 100, you should have it around 1 second. That is under very bright noon sun. Adjust accordingly. In the mean time, don't forget a tripod or some very steady surface.

  3. #3

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    okay! ... icic ... and hey, nerd's no nerd ... thanks for the explanation! so it's basically a wide aperture, long exposure + infra-red filter (which shud probably be renamed coz it's actually filtering out other wavelengths to let in infra-red rite??) ... but dat raises a qns ... will shooting with long exposures to capture infra-red images do any harm to your sensor - given that manufacturers are actually trying to keep those rays out? or is the sensor warming up and consequently producing more noise the only downside?

    cool! tho infra-red pics tend to look a lil eerie ... heheeh

  4. #4
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    Personally...I don't think it'll damage the CCD...cos the infra-red radiation is always there...just that the R72 filter away most of the visible spectrum so your Cam only captures near-IR light...

    I'm starting to go into IR pic taking using my C5050...realised that using wide apertures all the time tend to make focusing a lil difficult...I tried closing down on the apertures and it actually help in the focusing...however...I trade off on the shutter...therefore a Tripod is a must...

    heh...just my 2 cents...

  5. #5
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    It's not really the wide aperature that's important. It's just mean to help you have shorter shutter speeds and not too much motion blur. Like Kelster said, it won't damage your CCD. Just that warming it up will produce more noise.

    BTW, try and get a focus lock before you attach the filter cos my Canon A40 can't seem to focus once the filter is on. Exposure is correct though. Just that the picture is blurry.

  6. #6

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    ... and if you want to produce more colourful IR images with your 10D or 300D, you should carry out a custom white balance WITH the IR filter on the lens to remove most of the red cast from the original image. Non-DSLRs are much more sensitive to IR and exposure times are so short that they could be handheld most of the time but they also tend to produce IR images that are more B&W than coloured eg. like those from my Nikon CP 950.

    Another consideration for DSLRs is the choice of lens. Some lenses are not very suitable as they produce too much of an IR hot spot in the centre of the image.

  7. #7

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    icic ... thanks for the info dudes!!!! Appreciate it!! Looking forward to giving it a try some day

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