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Thread: How to utilise this scale?

  1. #1

    Default How to utilise this scale?

    Does anyone knows how to utilise this scale? I read somewhere in the forum about its use to estimate the hyperfocal length but can't seem to find it anymore. Thought it will be useful to know. Thanks


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  2. #2
    Senior Member Diavonex's Avatar
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    Default Re: How to utilise this scale?

    Quote Originally Posted by two200 View Post
    Does anyone knows how to utilise this scale? I read somewhere in the forum about its use to estimate the hyperfocal length but can't seem to find it anymore. Thought it will be useful to know. Thanks...
    This scale tells you the depth of field.

    Base on the picture, if you focus at 0.6m and use an aperture of F22, anything from 0.4m to infinity will be sharp.
    Last edited by Diavonex; 12th September 2009 at 11:25 PM.

  3. #3

    Default Re: How to utilise this scale?

    Quote Originally Posted by Diavonex View Post
    This scale tells you the depth of field.

    Base on the picture, if you focus at 0.6m and use an aperture of F22, anything from 0.4m to infinity will be sharp.
    Thanks for the quick reply.

    Need to clarify tho. 0.6m is taken from the white vertical line? F22 is from the L-shaped line with infinity symbol? But where does the 0.4m come from?
    Idea got, execution not!
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    Default Re: How to utilise this scale?

    Quote Originally Posted by Diavonex View Post
    This scale tells you the depth of field.

    Base on the picture, if you focus at 0.6m and use an aperture of F22, anything from 0.4m to infinity will be sharp.


    finally i get it

    Thanks!

  5. #5
    Moderator ziploc's Avatar
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    Default Re: How to utilise this scale?

    Quote Originally Posted by two200 View Post
    Thanks for the quick reply.

    Need to clarify tho. 0.6m is taken from the white vertical line? F22 is from the L-shaped line with infinity symbol? But where does the 0.4m come from?
    From the f/22 at the other end of the scale.

    See here for a good guide on hyperfocal distance.
    Last edited by ziploc; 13th September 2009 at 11:09 AM.

  6. #6

    Default Re: How to utilise this scale?

    Quote Originally Posted by ziploc View Post
    From the f/22 at the other end of the scale.

    See here for a good guide on hyperfocal distance.

    Oh, so its the opposite f22 that gives the distance. Thanks

    BTW, your link does not work. Can relink, please?
    Last edited by ziploc; 13th September 2009 at 11:09 AM.
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    Moderator ziploc's Avatar
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    Default Re: How to utilise this scale?

    Oops made a mistake while typing the link. Corrected.

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    Senior Member Diavonex's Avatar
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    Default Re: How to utilise this scale?

    Quote Originally Posted by two200 View Post
    Thanks for the quick reply.

    Need to clarify tho. 0.6m is taken from the white vertical line? F22 is from the L-shaped line with infinity symbol? But where does the 0.4m come from?
    Yes.

    Any thing between 0.3 and 0.5 must be 0.4 (estimate); that's the area infront of the F22 on the left.

  9. #9

    Default Re: How to utilise this scale?

    Quote Originally Posted by ziploc View Post
    Oops made a mistake while typing the link. Corrected.

    Thanks ziploc for the informative link. Now to find time to try out in the field
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  10. #10
    Moderator ziploc's Avatar
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    Default Re: How to utilise this scale?

    You're welcome.

    Btw, here is how I would normally use the scale:

    1. Choose an aperture, e.g. f/16.
    2. Set manual focus mode, and turn the focusing ring so that the infinity mark aligns with the choosen aperture, f/16 in this case.
    3. The center mark indicates where the focus is at, but this is for info only and you don't need to care about it.
    4. The distance marking falling on f/16 at the other end is where the nearest point of which it will be in focus. Check that this is what you desire. If not, choose another aperture. and repeat from step 1.
    5. Compose and shoot.

    Using your lens as an example: focus and set the infinity mark to f/16, the hyperfocusing range would be ~0.5m-infinity, and the focusing point is ~1m.

    Some lenses do not have any DOF scale on them. For those lenses you would need to use the hyperfocusing charts/wheel available on the DOFMaster website.

  11. #11

    Default Re: How to utilise this scale?

    Quote Originally Posted by ziploc View Post
    You're welcome.

    Btw, here is how I would normally use the scale:

    1. Choose an aperture, e.g. f/16.
    2. Set manual focus mode, and turn the focusing ring so that the infinity mark aligns with the choosen aperture, f/16 in this case.
    3. The center mark indicates where the focus is at, but this is for info only and you don't need to care about it.
    4. The distance marking falling on f/16 at the other end is where the nearest point of which it will be in focus. Check that this is what you desire. If not, choose another aperture. and repeat from step 1.
    5. Compose and shoot.

    Using your lens as an example: focus and set the infinity mark to f/16, the hyperfocusing range would be ~0.5m-infinity, and the focusing point is ~1m.

    Some lenses do not have any DOF scale on them. For those lenses you would need to use the hyperfocusing charts/wheel available on the DOFMaster website.
    BTW what does the R mean in the picture?
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  12. #12
    Member watsup's Avatar
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    Default Re: How to utilise this scale?

    So from the picture, for F16 anything between ~0.45 to 5m will be sharp? Correct me if i am wrong.

  13. #13

    Default Re: How to utilise this scale?

    Quote Originally Posted by watsup View Post
    So from the picture, for F16 anything between ~0.45 to 5m will be sharp? Correct me if i am wrong.
    From my understanding, yes if you focus about 1 m away.
    ....... But I'll let the experts have the final word
    Idea got, execution not!
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  14. #14

    Default Re: How to utilise this scale?

    Quote Originally Posted by two200 View Post
    BTW what does the R mean in the picture?
    Its the Infrared focus point I believe..

  15. #15
    Moderator ziploc's Avatar
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    Default Re: How to utilise this scale?

    Quote Originally Posted by two200 View Post
    BTW what does the R mean in the picture?
    I have no idea what that "R" means. Maybe you could check out your lens' manual?

    Quote Originally Posted by watsup View Post
    So from the picture, for F16 anything between ~0.45 to 5m will be sharp? Correct me if i am wrong.
    From the pic, the lens is focusing at 2 ft. If you set aperture to f/16, the DOF range will be from 0.5 to 5 ft, and anything within this range will be considered sharp.

    This is actually how we derive at the hyperfocal distance. Let's think back in reverse: if we want the DOF to be from some distance x to infinity, e.g. at aperture f/16, then we'll need x to be on one side of f/16 and infinity on the other side of f/16 (remember that's how we define DOF). So, we just set infinity to f/16, and we can find out what x, and the focusing point is. Interesting isn't it?
    Last edited by ziploc; 16th September 2009 at 11:10 PM.

  16. #16
    Moderator ziploc's Avatar
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    Default Re: How to utilise this scale?

    Quote Originally Posted by J-Chan View Post
    Its the Infrared focus point I believe..
    Oh yes that's right, you reminded me. That is the infrared focusing point.

  17. #17

    Default Re: How to utilise this scale?

    wow... which lens is that? I've not seen that on the EF lenses I've been working on lol,
    guess we entry grade DSLR users have it easy =)
    better to be Socrates dissatisfied than a fool satisfied -J.S. Mill
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  18. #18

    Default Re: How to utilise this scale?

    I'm guessing the Sigma 30mm f/1.4, but does that matter?

  19. #19

    Default Re: How to utilise this scale?

    not to stray off topic too much, but I was thinking of getting a sigma18-200 or tamron 18-270 VC next, so was wondering if that was a common feature on the sigma lens, and if so, probably learning how to use it would be best.

    That said, my question earlier was answered, thanks for the helpful link!
    better to be Socrates dissatisfied than a fool satisfied -J.S. Mill
    1000D. My works

  20. #20
    Moderator ziploc's Avatar
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    Default Re: How to utilise this scale?

    Quote Originally Posted by Keenblade View Post
    wow... which lens is that? I've not seen that on the EF lenses I've been working on lol,
    guess we entry grade DSLR users have it easy =)
    A lot of Nikon zoom lenses don't have the scale either. That's because the scale is different at different focal length. If it is not available on your lens then the other ways are to either print a DOF wheel, or download a DOF calculation software to your PDA/phone (see DOFMaster website mentioned above). But I think manufacturers should include this info on the LCD screen though, as it is not hard to do so since the focal length and aperture value are available on the camera.

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