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Thread: impossible exposure

  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by noblerot
    recently, i read a book on creative photography as i was going through all the different exposure settings i realised the settings are unrealistic at least to me it is.

    there are alot of landscape outdoor shots, taken at F16 1/125 to 1/250, disbelief i decided to bring my camera out during the brightest time of the day
    i was happy to get away with F8 1/60 to 1/125. There are no flash used in those shots i read. anyone has any inkling what else he did to achieve that, i am sure i miss out something here.

    the images are all very crisp i dont think he pushed up his iso in this case.
    Dunno about you, I just tried metering out of my window, its not terribly bright but was able to acheive f16 at a/180....think i also depends on where you meter. Try metering the sky, i'm sure you can get those figures

  2. #22

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    your point is valid but the shots were taken in few secs diff, no drastic changed in temperature except for the changed in exposures.

    i was trying to demonstrate how the image looks darker on normal exposure, i was using matrix metering (on auto wb)

    i agree with chriszzz that i shouldnt compensate everytime i take but as you could see, i could not figure out what's the cause other than faithfully compensate it everytime.

    i hope this didnt complicate my question, i basically want to confirm if is normal for a camera to read a balance exposure and churn out an underexposed image (even if grey card is used to neutralise the wb)


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    side track abit, what would you do to achieve these images: -

    http://www.pbase.com/mdejong/new_zealand







    Quote Originally Posted by Zerstorer
    Didn't you notice that the sunlight was changing in those 4 shots, not to mention that the framing is different?

    Sunny vs overcast conditions is more than sufficient to offset 2 stop EV compensation.

  3. #23

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    Perhaps you might want to repeat your test under indoor light at with camera mounted on tripod and spot metered. This is a better indicator of whether the metering is working properly or not. Matrix metering has a certain degree of inconsistency due to the way it works, but the main part I see is that the sun was significantly brighter in your first pic as the shadows vs highlights are much more distinct. Changes in sunlight can account for rather large variations of 2 stops or more.

    In any case, I've successfully applied the Sunny/16 rule on a manual camera with slide film before, so I can confirm that the settings you described in your original post are well achievable.

    As for the pbase images, only the first pic looks special in that there might have been gradual blue+ warming filters used or perhaps a blue/gold polarizor. The other shots seem to be taken as is.

  4. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by noblerot
    i hope this didnt complicate my question, i basically want to confirm if is normal for a camera to read a balance exposure and churn out an underexposed image (even if grey card is used to neutralise the wb)
    It is certainly not normal for a camera to churn out an underexposed image, provided that the scene was metered properly. A camera meter attempts to give a correct exposure for a mid tone subject such that it appears to be a mid tone. Anything that is brighter or darker would require you to compensate to achieve a proper exposure. Matrix metering algorithms attempt to guess the proper exposure according to a database of image samples, but they are often fooled when the subjects are light colour or dark coloured or extra reflective.

    White balance settings affect only the colour temperature and should not affect the exposure at all.

  5. #25

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    thanks for today's exchanges. need sometime to think and try it out again.
    it is kinda difficult to explain my problems here, if there are any coffee session in smaller group to discuss about photography, pls count me in.

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    as for Marcel de Jong's images, i think some of them are digitally doctored, i couldsee rich saturation. i find it hard to give a perfect exposure to show the cloud formation and at the same time perfect details on ground (then again it only show my kung fu buey kao)







    Quote Originally Posted by Zerstorer
    It is certainly not normal for a camera to churn out an underexposed image, provided that the scene was metered properly. A camera meter attempts to give a correct exposure for a mid tone subject such that it appears to be a mid tone. Anything that is brighter or darker would require you to compensate to achieve a proper exposure. Matrix metering algorithms attempt to guess the proper exposure according to a database of image samples, but they are often fooled when the subjects are light colour or dark coloured or extra reflective.

    White balance settings affect only the colour temperature and should not affect the exposure at all.

  6. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by noblerot
    thanks for today's exchanges. need sometime to think and try it out again.
    it is kinda difficult to explain my problems here, if there are any coffee session in smaller group to discuss about photography, pls count me in.
    No problem.
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    as for Marcel de Jong's images, i think some of them are digitally doctored, i couldsee rich saturation. i find it hard to give a perfect exposure to show the cloud formation and at the same time perfect details on ground (then again it only show my kung fu buey kao)
    Try Graduated Neutral Density Filters(ND Grad). They can help reduce the lighting contrast between sky and foreground.

  7. #27

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    Quote Originally Posted by Zerstorer
    No problem.

    Try Graduated Neutral Density Filters(ND Grad). They can help reduce the lighting contrast between sky and foreground.
    Thanks for the tip, i have wanted to buy ND grad for a while, i kept forgetting everytime i step into cs overwhelmed by other things

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