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Thread: Polarizer usage

  1. #1
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    Default Polarizer usage

    Hi,
    Any advise on how to use the polarizer filter to the best effect? Facing the sun from the side, directly shooting to the sun or sun from back?
    If you are shooting with the sun back, I don't think you need a polariser..
    Got one few days ago and tried out during the weekend.. don't really see any different when using the polarizer and sem like it doesn't work when shooting directly to the sun.. hmm.

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eyesthruthelens
    Hi,
    Any advise on how to use the polarizer filter to the best effect? Facing the sun from the side, directly shooting to the sun or sun from back?
    If you are shooting with the sun back, I don't think you need a polariser..
    Got one few days ago and tried out during the weekend.. don't really see any different when using the polarizer and sem like it doesn't work when shooting directly to the sun.. hmm.
    Polarizing filters work best when at a 90 degree angle to the sun. This is due to the way they work.

    For best results turn the polarizer so that it's working at maximum and then back it off a bit otherwise you will wind up with either a blackened sky if using highly saturated film such as Velvia or lightfall off in the corners of the sky.

    An angle of around 35 degrees works best when using a polarizing filter to reduce reflections and glare from water and glass windows.
    The Ang Moh from Hell
    Professional Photography - many are called, few are chosen!

  3. #3

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    How do you ensure the filter is in 90 degrees or 35 degrees ? Even if there is an index mark there, whats the orientation like ?

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    Quote Originally Posted by ashbaby
    How do you ensure the filter is in 90 degrees or 35 degrees ? Even if there is an index mark there, whats the orientation like ?
    What Ian is referring to is 90 degrees between the sun and where the camera is pointing at.

    One seldom have to worry aobut the actual rotation angle of the polarizing filter on the lens. Like Ian said, just turn it until the sky is darkest and then back off a little to achieve a more natural deep blue sky.
    As complexity rises, precise statements lose meaning and meaningful statements lose precision.

  5. #5

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    just checking, will polarizer cut down spotlights too?
    I was thinking of using it on events or indoor shoots. And for normal shots, does it make any difference? Is there a polarizer that does not need to turn? but has ability to cut down the sun without rotating?

    And whats linear and circular? heard there is some difference towards its use for digital and SLR cameras. Anyone can enlightend.

    Thanks


    This is a nice handbook for B+W filters.

    http://www.schneideroptics.com/filte...aphy/handbook/

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ian
    Polarizing filters work best when at a 90 degree angle to the sun. This is due to the way they work.

    For best results turn the polarizer so that it's working at maximum and then back it off a bit otherwise you will wind up with either a blackened sky if using highly saturated film such as Velvia or lightfall off in the corners of the sky.

    An angle of around 35 degrees works best when using a polarizing filter to reduce reflections and glare from water and glass windows.
    Thanks.. that explained why I don't see any different when using the polarizer..
    Read somewhere in the internet that Polarizer filter is one of the top in the list of MUST have filter for photography.. So I got one to try out.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by harlowmac
    just checking, will polarizer cut down spotlights too?
    I was thinking of using it on events or indoor shoots. And for normal shots, does it make any difference? Is there a polarizer that does not need to turn? but has ability to cut down the sun without rotating?

    And whats linear and circular? heard there is some difference towards its use for digital and SLR cameras. Anyone can enlightend.

    Thanks
    No a PL won't have any effect on spotlights or other artificial lighting.

    For normal photography indoors a PL makes no difference and should be removed as the filter blocks quite a lot of light (between 1.5 and 2.5 stops typically).

    When shooting outdoors you need to use your judgement, a polarizer will slightly increase contrast and staturation of colours in some circumstances and is great for control of reflections off glass and water as well as making a sky more blue and the clouds stand out more.

    The end result on film is indistinguishable between a linear and circular polarizer, however linear polarizers interfere with the auto focus mechanism on most AF cameras so you should always buy a circular polarizer if your camera has auto focus. Linear polarizers are suitable for manual focus cameras only.

    All photographic polarizers rotate, there are fixed postion polarizers available for scientific and industrial purposes however.
    Last edited by Ian; 29th December 2003 at 11:24 PM.
    The Ang Moh from Hell
    Professional Photography - many are called, few are chosen!

  8. #8

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    thanks for the heads up.
    clear my doubts.

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