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Thread: Most Appropriate Film(s)

  1. #1
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    Default Most Appropriate Film(s)

    Hello All,

    Imagine if you will the following environment ...

    Situation (environment):

    12'x14' room with 9' ceiling. CRT (tube) projector mounted on ceiling and projecting an image (80" wide and either 34 to 60" tall, depending on aspect ratio of video/film source) onto a projection screen made of some sort of vinyl/PVC material that is tensioned onto a metal frame. Room's walls and ceiling are a very, very dark flat-purple (except screen wall if flat-black) with black carpeting and complete ambient light control. This is my current home theater environment.

    Equipment:

    I will be using a Nikon N80 with 28-105mm f/3.5-4.5 D lens. No flash. Tripod, timer, and bracketing technique.

    Objective:

    I am trying to photographically capture the projected image and surround area immediately outside of the projected image. Need to authentically (as best as I can) reproduce the projected image as a viewer in the room would see the image with their own eyes.

    Question:

    Considering the ambient light is in complete control, but with the desire to fill the frame with the projected image, what are some if the reccomended color films that someone in this position should be looking at?

  2. #2

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    Just meter and shoot since you have a tripod, you can use even ISO100 film if the image isn't moving. Can even be taken handheld at ISO1600 f2.8.

    Bracketing on print film isn't really required. If you want better shadow detail, just add +1EV.

  3. #3
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    I've been away from photography since 1995. During that time the only photography I've conducted was candid and with the use of low-performance digital cameras. Not much was expected in this area and not much resulted.

    On the other hand, when I endeavored into film-based photography from 1986 to 1995 I never attempted this type of documentive photography, which made me wonder about which films, if any, would be more appropriate.

    For instance, wishing to reproduce authentic colors, saturation, hues, black detail, and even the light spill from the CRT projector are desired. I do not want overly saturated colors, etc. that I could probably produce using certain negative/positive films.

    For film-based sources I can pause the projected images for minutes at a time (not desirable, but I can), but for video (HDTV) its like 5-seconds, I think, maybe a little longer.

    My post-exposure processing will come as a result of film-scanning and Photoshop with the best attempt to bring about what I see on two calibrated video monitors to what I see on the screen. BTW, how far has consumer films come these days? Should I continue old habits and continue to use professional films?

  4. #4

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    Authentic colours? That will be a problem as long as you intend to scan film, regardless of whether it is pro film or not. You will certainly need to colour correct no matter what scanner you are using as it will never be exactly the same. Perhaps you might want to consider shooting on lower contrast slides such as Fuji Astia if the contrast range of the scene isn't that great. They tend to require less corrections than negatives after scanning.

  5. #5
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    I guess what I meant by using photoshop et al was in case the film I chose artificially 'enhanced' the colors. I remember the first time I used Velvia and how it portrayed the green grass (better than reality).

  6. #6

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    Well, the reason why people like velvia is because they want the deep contrasts and ultra-saturated greens it produces. There are saturated and contrasty films and there are those which have a more natural balance.

    If you want accuracy choose films like NPS160 or Reala, or for slides Astia or Kodak E100G.

    In any case as I've said, colour accuracy is dependent on your scanner and software, once there is scanning involved, you will need to colour correct to some extent.

  7. #7
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    From your description of the room, trying to obtain colour accuracy will be quite a feat. This is especially so when you are trying to take a picture with mixed lighting. Even if the image on the screen is still, you still need to have a appropriate shutter speed to overcome the refresh flicker.

  8. #8
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    Zerstorer, color correct from the scan process is understood. Prismatic, even with inexpensive digital cameras I have managed to avoid seeing any refresh conditions. Actually, I only have seen them (to date) on video cameras). But, then again, I have not tried to take the picture of a projected image.

  9. #9

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    You will see scan lines if your shutter speed is set too high though. The recommended shutter speed is 1/30 or slower, although I have successfully taken projected shots at 1/60 without problem.

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