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Thread: what iso flim to use ????

  1. #1

    Default what iso flim to use ????

    bought a conventional camera recently ......... wanted to try abit of street photography ......... in places like city area.......... what iso flim shld i try ????? so that no flash is used ????

    thanks
    7ways

  2. #2
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    you can try hp-5 from ilford.good in the midtones and with proper processing you get good grain.

  3. #3

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    for fuss free black n white film : use kodak TCN400. it is an ISO 400 chromogenic film . just send to usual labs to develop n print. good grain, pushable to ISO 1600 (my taste, at least that is)

    for real-skills-needed-to develop black n white film: everythign else. the quality is also good.

    welcome to the world of moody b/w cityscapes! cheerz

  4. #4

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    thanks for the above reply !!!

    how abt in colour ????? also..... what do u mean by pushing the flim??????

    thanks
    7ways

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    Quote Originally Posted by sevenWAYS
    thanks for the above reply !!!

    how abt in colour ????? also..... what do u mean by pushing the flim??????

    thanks
    7ways
    colour can try fuijifilm press 800

  6. #6

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    colour negative film:

    cheap n good all round colour negative film: fuji superia xtra 400.

    recommended for portraiture: fuji reala 100 (abit expensive.. hehe)

    the so-called "weddign film": fuji NPS (or is it NPC...anyway its either of these 2). rated as ISO400. main thing is it offers low contrast between colours.

    for low light events: fuji press800 good grain, pushing to ISO 1600 yields acceptable results.

    colour slide film:

    fuji provia 100, provia 400.

    i dun work for fuji, its just that i was a lil bit lazy to try out kodak n the rest

    pushing: deliberately underexposing film during exposure but during developing u let it "develop longer" to compensate back for the exposure. idea is to make a convenient gain on usable shutter speed during the exposure. minor side effects: colours may go a bit "off"

  7. #7

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    You all recommend him all the expensive "pro" film that he can't find in the neighbourhood photo shops...wah biang...like that his pocket gonna go bust in no time!

    I remember seeing an article/comparison chart on the different films on ClubSNAP's main page; go there and find out if anything there suits you.

    For a start try using the Kodak MAX 400 or Fujifilm Superia X-TRA 400 if you intend to shoot mostly telephoto/slow lens handheld. If you want to shoot in bright sunlight the Kodak GOLD 200 or Fujifilm Superia 200 is better for finer grain. In terms of your "street photography" I presume you're aiming for handheld, and thus a ISO 400 film gives you the best compromise between speed and grain.

    Fujifilm is slightly more saturated/vibrant in colors compared to Kodak.

    Practically speaking the grains between the ISO 200 and 400 films will not be very obvious for a beginner printing in 4R sizes.

    For slides I've only tried Fujifilm Provia 100F--good grains and color. Slide films in general have much better color saturation and is really fun! However, the downside is that they are EXPENSIVE.

    Go try different films and you'll realise the subtle differences...have fun!

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    Quote Originally Posted by sevenWAYS
    thanks for the above reply !!!

    how abt in colour ????? also..... what do u mean by pushing the flim??????

    thanks
    7ways
    For colour I suggest Fuji Superia 200 or 400. Think if you are into street photography and if there is sufficient light go for 200 if not you can try a higher rating of 400. Both films are relatively cheap and should be affordable for someone starting out.

    Pushing film merely means settign the ISO higher then that it was rated. For example, since all film are DX coded, if you use a ISO 200 film on your camera, it automatically detects its 200 and sets the ISO setting to 200. Similar for other rated films. If you "push" you film, you will force your camera to set the ISO setting to (for example) 400, when it actually is only 200. This will give you one more stop in terms of exposure.

    The advantages of this is that you take shots in low light conditions, but your pictures will tend to be more grainy and also, more expensive cos you have to tell your developer to PUSH process. This will cost more.

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