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Thread: Exposure metering question

  1. #1

    Default Exposure metering question

    I read this from Lee Filter's website:
    "Take a reading using average centre weighted metering by viewing the foreground which you wish to be correctly exposed, and this will be your base exposure.
    The camera should be set to manual.
    Repeat the process with the sky and note the exposure difference between the two readings. Select a Neutral Density Graduated Filter that will correct the exposure difference to approximately 1 stop. For example, if the sky is 3 stops brighter than the ground, add a 0.6 ND (2 stop) grad filter to the sky only. Compose your image through the lens and position
    the filter by viewing through the lens. Stopping the lens down using depth of field preview makes the grad transition line easier to see. Expose the image using the base exposure measured from the area not covered by the filter. With practice, this method can give very acceptable results, with a high rate of success."

    Due to n00bness, I don't quite understand the technique. Does it mean I first get my base exposure (foreground) readings, then meter the background and see how many stops difference there is btw base and background?

    i.e. base exposure = 1/125, f/5.6, ISO100 (correctly exposed)
    background exposure = 1/15, f/5.6, ISO100 (correctly exposed)
    Diff = 3 stop on shutter speed, therefore use 0.6ND to get 1 stop difference btw base and background

    Correct?

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Exposure metering question

    yes your understanding is correct... but i heard spot metering can be also used...

  3. #3
    Senior Member zac08's Avatar
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    Default Re: Exposure metering question

    Quote Originally Posted by jaRv1s View Post
    yes your understanding is correct... but i heard spot metering can be also used...
    Depending on the brightness and colour of the area you spot meter, it can make quite a difference.

    Basically, you'd need to understand more on the lighting and how exposure is metered or zoned.
    Michael Lim
    My Flickr Site

  4. #4

    Default Re: Exposure metering question

    Quote Originally Posted by cks2k2 View Post
    I read this from Lee Filter's website:
    "Take a reading using average centre weighted metering by viewing the foreground which you wish to be correctly exposed, and this will be your base exposure.
    The camera should be set to manual.
    Repeat the process with the sky and note the exposure difference between the two readings. Select a Neutral Density Graduated Filter that will correct the exposure difference to approximately 1 stop. For example, if the sky is 3 stops brighter than the ground, add a 0.6 ND (2 stop) grad filter to the sky only. Compose your image through the lens and position
    the filter by viewing through the lens. Stopping the lens down using depth of field preview makes the grad transition line easier to see. Expose the image using the base exposure measured from the area not covered by the filter. With practice, this method can give very acceptable results, with a high rate of success."

    Due to n00bness, I don't quite understand the technique. Does it mean I first get my base exposure (foreground) readings, then meter the background and see how many stops difference there is btw base and background?

    i.e. base exposure = 1/125, f/5.6, ISO100 (correctly exposed)
    background exposure = 1/15, f/5.6, ISO100 (correctly exposed)
    Diff = 3 stop on shutter speed, therefore use 0.6ND to get 1 stop difference btw base and background

    Correct?
    yup correct, but i think u mixed up background and foreground readings in your example, usually the backgound (sky) is brighter than the foreground. therefore the reading should be as below:

    i.e. base exposure = 1/15, f/5.6, ISO100 (correctly exposed)
    background exposure = 1/125, f/5.6, ISO100 (correctly exposed)


    Quote Originally Posted by jaRv1s View Post
    yes your understanding is correct... but i heard spot metering can be also used...
    metering is just a tool to help you get the desired exposure, you can use any metering mode, but you have to use them in correct way to get the result you wan.

  5. #5

    Default Re: Exposure metering question

    Quote Originally Posted by cks2k2 View Post
    I read this from Lee Filter's website:
    "Take a reading using average centre weighted metering by viewing the foreground which you wish to be correctly exposed, and this will be your base exposure.
    The camera should be set to manual.
    Repeat the process with the sky and note the exposure difference between the two readings. Select a Neutral Density Graduated Filter that will correct the exposure difference to approximately 1 stop. For example, if the sky is 3 stops brighter than the ground, add a 0.6 ND (2 stop) grad filter to the sky only. Compose your image through the lens and position
    the filter by viewing through the lens. Stopping the lens down using depth of field preview makes the grad transition line easier to see. Expose the image using the base exposure measured from the area not covered by the filter. With practice, this method can give very acceptable results, with a high rate of success."

    Due to n00bness, I don't quite understand the technique. Does it mean I first get my base exposure (foreground) readings, then meter the background and see how many stops difference there is btw base and background?

    i.e. base exposure = 1/125, f/5.6, ISO100 (correctly exposed)
    background exposure = 1/15, f/5.6, ISO100 (correctly exposed)
    Diff = 3 stop on shutter speed, therefore use 0.6ND to get 1 stop difference btw base and background

    Correct?
    Wah brother, can't understand sia me.. cmi

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