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Thread: how to judge what F stop (apperture) to use?

  1. #21
    Member serametin's Avatar
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    Default Re: how to judge what F stop (apperture) to use?

    Quote Originally Posted by Rashkae View Post
    Aaah. I think you have that the other way around.
    hahaha.. u r correct. thks for pointing out the mistake.

  2. #22
    Senior Member wildcat's Avatar
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    Default Re: how to judge what F stop (apperture) to use?

    Quote Originally Posted by ZerocoolAstra View Post
    Usually for night scenes, a tripod is used. Thus a long exposure is not a problem, and a large aperture is unnecessary.
    For example, most of my night landscapes are taken at about f/7.1-f/8, for up to a few seconds exposure. Doesn't need a fast lens.
    Okay, that's true also. So err.. actually biggest aperture is mostly used in sports where you want to freeze action, or when you want "dreamy" good bokeh with only subject in focus. Correct?

    Just to get a feel, is the bokeh between f2.8 and f3.5 significant enough to justify an upgrade?

    (sorry to TS for borrowing thread to discuss)

  3. #23
    Member Cartman2000's Avatar
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    Default Re: how to judge what F stop (apperture) to use?

    Quote Originally Posted by wildcat View Post
    Okay, that's true also. So err.. actually biggest aperture is mostly used in sports where you want to freeze action, or when you want "dreamy" good bokeh with only subject in focus. Correct?

    Just to get a feel, is the bokeh between f2.8 and f3.5 significant enough to justify an upgrade?

    (sorry to TS for borrowing thread to discuss)
    Not much. But you do get the extra 2/3 stops.

  4. #24

    Default Re: how to judge what F stop (apperture) to use?

    Quote Originally Posted by Cartman2000 View Post
    Not much. But you do get the extra 2/3 stops.
    Hi Cartman, can you elaborate 2/3 stops means, sorry a bit blur about how to calculate ...
    Nikon D90 12/24mm/ 18-105mm / 50mm f1.8

  5. #25
    Member serametin's Avatar
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    Default Re: how to judge what F stop (apperture) to use?

    Quote Originally Posted by orionct View Post
    Hi Cartman, can you elaborate 2/3 stops means, sorry a bit blur about how to calculate ...
    check this:
    http://www.fredparker.com/ultexp1.htm#useful

    example: f5.6 to f11 is two stops.

  6. #26
    Senior Member wildcat's Avatar
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    Default Re: how to judge what F stop (apperture) to use?

    Thanks Cartman2000 for the reply.

    Yep, f2.8 to f4 is a full one stop so f2.8 to f3.5 is only 2/3 of a stop.

  7. #27
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    Default Re: how to judge what F stop (apperture) to use?

    As a newbie to DSLR without any shooting partners, I would attempt the following method and to learn (via the hard way):

    Set the setting to P mode. Take the shot and observe the settings (speed, iso, aperture) inside the view finder choosen by camera. Then switch to manual mode. Play around aperture settings -- increasing or decrease from the auto selected value. Take a series of photos.

    After upload the pic to PC, the software to edit can display under photo properties what settings you have chosen for each individual photos. Based on the quality of photo you like, then remember that setting by writing down in handphone or notebook -use as reference next time photo shoot.

    Not sure this will work or not.

  8. #28
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    Default Re: how to judge what F stop (apperture) to use?

    Quote Originally Posted by dykat2009 View Post
    Set the setting to P mode.
    Do it with aperture-priority mode.

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