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Thread: Aperture priority, Shutter priority vs full manual setting

  1. #21
    Senior Member ZerocoolAstra's Avatar
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    Default Re: Aperture priority, Shutter priority vs full manual setting

    Quote Originally Posted by LBL2009 View Post
    Some point and shoot cameras have the Aperture priority and Shutter priority features but I would prefer manual aperture and shutter setting. Does this mean my only solution is to get a DSLR? I know getting into DSLR means more than a camera body and a len. There are additional basic items I have to buy.

    I am interested in landscape and portrait pictures. Unlikely to use zoom often and a wide angle len is preferred.

    I read some postings and review on Panasonic Lumix LX3. It seems a good fit but it doesn't allow me to set aperture and shutter manually. That is, I can either set aperture and the camera decides the shutter or the other way round.

    My question is would a Aperture priority and Shutter priority good enough for me or I should really take a look at entry level DSLR?

    I appreciate your comments and recommendation.
    You could consider a bridge/prosumer/superzoom camera. Has similar functionality to a DSLR, but without the need to change lenses. DSLR still produces cleaner and ultimately sharper pictures, but the price you pay is both financially and physically (having to lug it around). My friend has only a DSLR w kit lens and a drybox. That's it. So it doesn't necessarily have to equate to LOTS and LOTS of accessories, though I must admit the temptation is HUGE.

    Most cameras that have A or S would likely have M too. I've yet to come across one that doesn't.
    Exploring! :)

  2. #22
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    Default Re: Aperture priority, Shutter priority vs full manual setting

    Quote Originally Posted by ZerocoolAstra View Post
    You could consider a bridge/prosumer/superzoom camera. Has similar functionality to a DSLR, but without the need to change lenses. DSLR still produces cleaner and ultimately sharper pictures, but the price you pay is both financially and physically (having to lug it around). My friend has only a DSLR w kit lens and a drybox. That's it. So it doesn't necessarily have to equate to LOTS and LOTS of accessories, though I must admit the temptation is HUGE.

    Most cameras that have A or S would likely have M too. I've yet to come across one that doesn't.
    Thanks for your comment and yes, I found out that LX3 has manual function which is what I want. LX3 is in my list of preference. I am also looking at second-hand entry level DSLR with kit lens selling around the same price as a brand new LX3. It could be good alternative, I thought.

  3. #23
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    Default Re: Aperture priority, Shutter priority vs full manual setting

    look at the canon G10, one of my friends who gave up on dslrs isusing it, and he says it is really darn good

  4. #24

    Default Re: Aperture priority, Shutter priority vs full manual setting

    Quote Originally Posted by LBL2009 View Post
    Some point and shoot cameras have the Aperture priority and Shutter priority features but I would prefer manual aperture and shutter setting. Does this mean my only solution is to get a DSLR? I know getting into DSLR means more than a camera body and a len. There are additional basic items I have to buy.

    I am interested in landscape and portrait pictures. Unlikely to use zoom often and a wide angle len is preferred.

    I read some postings and review on Panasonic Lumix LX3. It seems a good fit but it doesn't allow me to set aperture and shutter manually. That is, I can either set aperture and the camera decides the shutter or the other way round.

    My question is would a Aperture priority and Shutter priority good enough for me or I should really take a look at entry level DSLR?

    I appreciate your comments and recommendation.
    I think it is a misconception that you need to buy more when you have a DSLR. A DSLR is a camera, a PnS is a camera, both has a body and a lens in combination. People buy only because they wanted to, buy a DSLR and take it out of the box, you can shoot away just like any cam. But it does gives you the flexibility to add more, but do not confuse flexibility with requirements.

    If you are interested in Photography, go for a DSLR.

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