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Thread: Kit lens vs Consumer lens vs Pro Lens

  1. #1
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    Default Kit lens vs Consumer lens vs Pro Lens

    Hi all,

    I currently own a 28-90mm kit lens, a 70-210mm and 50mm f/1.8 comsumer lens.

    Question: Let say I "upgrade" to a Tamron 24-135mm lens from my kit lens, what is the difference I will see (other than the range).

    Also, if I upgrade to a Tamrom 28-75mm f/2.8 DI lens, what gains do i see?

  2. #2

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    the 24-135 will be like a all in one lens solution for most people.
    image quality will sure increase over your 28-90 and 70-210, built quality will also be alot better... means u can bang your lens around more.


    the 28-75 u will gain a brighter viewfinder, abit faster AF speed, lighter weight compare to 24-135, better low light shooting due to the F2.8, nicer bokeh, etc...

    minus is that u lose the 24-28 and the 75-135 range

  3. #3

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    a simplified answer - image quality - sharpness

    the kit lens would lack contrast, sharpness

    The Tamron 28-75mm f/2.8 DI lens by many accounts gives good image quality. The Tamron 24-135mm lens is "average". The 50mm f1.8 despite its cheap price gives outstanding image quality

    Other differences - kit lens would have poor build quality eg plastic mount and are very slow. AF is also slow

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by goering
    a simplified answer - image quality - sharpness

    the kit lens would lack contrast, sharpness

    The Tamron 28-75mm f/2.8 DI lens by many accounts gives good image quality. The Tamron 24-135mm lens is "average". The 50mm f1.8 despite its cheap price gives outstanding image quality

    Other differences - kit lens would have poor build quality eg plastic mount and are very slow. AF is also slow
    Tamron got 50mm f1.8 meh ?????

  5. #5
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    Smile Kit lens vs Consumer lens vs Pro lens

    Quote Originally Posted by pethidine
    Hi all,

    I currently own a 28-90mm kit lens, a 70-210mm and 50mm f/1.8 comsumer lens.

    Question: Let say I "upgrade" to a Tamron 24-135mm lens from my kit lens, what is the difference I will see (other than the range).

    Also, if I upgrade to a Tamrom 28-75mm f/2.8 DI lens, what gains do i see?
    Tamron 24-135 - I presume the aperture is variable and will be f/5.6 at the long end. This makes indoor available light close to impossible. Your viewfinder will also be rather dark.

    Tamron 28-75 f/2.8 - you'll immediately appreciate the brighter viewfinder, which will aid manual focussing. I have no experience with the image quality, though.

    With your current setup, I see no need for you to get another lens. Getting a zoom with more than a X3 power ratio will usually mean "not-so-good-quality" images. If you really want another lens, trade your 28-90 for the manufacturer's 28mm lens. You'll be amazed by the results.

  6. #6
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    Default

    Trade? Where to trade lens? TCW?

    Anyway, I as thinking of getting a robust travel lens, so as no need to bring along all my barang barang for short (rush rush type) family trips. 24mm good for landscape, and limiting myself to 135 because i can prevent myself from zooming too much when the lighting condition is bad....

    I had only used my 50mm twice (indoors), and did notice that sharpness it gives, as compared to my kit lens. This lens will always be in my bag.

    Heard that the Sigma 24-135mm (f/2.8 - 4.5) is not very good. Seems like many people prefers tamron lenses to Sigma (erm.. maybe Sigma's EX series is better).

    One more question, will the Tamron 24-135mm (67mm??) lens block my SLR's build-in flash? (I am using EOS 33). I think the Sigma 24-135 does (77mm??).

    Thanks.

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by pethidine
    One more question, will the Tamron 24-135mm (67mm??) lens block my SLR's build-in flash? (I am using EOS 33). I think the Sigma 24-135 does (77mm??).

    Thanks.
    theard size is 72mm

    remove the lens hood so minimise the blockage. at wide angle it shouldnt be a problem

  8. #8
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    Default

    Rule of thumb...invest in good lens

  9. #9
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    Default What lens?

    Quote Originally Posted by pethidine
    Trade? Where to trade lens? TCW?

    Anyway, I as thinking of getting a robust travel lens, so as no need to bring along all my barang barang for short (rush rush type) family trips. 24mm good for landscape, and limiting myself to 135 because i can prevent myself from zooming too much when the lighting condition is bad....

    I had only used my 50mm twice (indoors), and did notice that sharpness it gives, as compared to my kit lens. This lens will always be in my bag.

    Heard that the Sigma 24-135mm (f/2.8 - 4.5) is not very good. Seems like many people prefers tamron lenses to Sigma (erm.. maybe Sigma's EX series is better).

    One more question, will the Tamron 24-135mm (67mm??) lens block my SLR's build-in flash? (I am using EOS 33). I think the Sigma 24-135 does (77mm??).

    Thanks.
    Ok, first off, I'm not familiar with Canon. I'm a Nikon user.

    I've owned 3 zooms previously and have switched to an all-primes system. The difference in image quality is easily seen.

    But if cost is a concern, do the best you can and avoid variable aperture zooms and stay away from zooms with more than 3X zoom power.

    That 50/1.8 shouldn't be in your bag; it should be on your camera more often. If there's one lens that can let you learn the basics, the 50/1.8 is the one. Then as you progress, you can then decide what sort of photography interests you more: landscapes, candids, street or portraits.

    Generally:

    For landscapes, focal lengths of 20, 24 or 28mm should suffice. But there are also people who shoot landscapes with a 105mm. It's your own style that matters.

    For candids and street photography, I prefer available light and your 50/1.8 is great for this. The 35/1.4 would be ideal, at least for me. Using a 24mm will almost let you shoot focus-free (if you pre-focus on zone) with an aperture of around f/8 and shoot from your waist. Nobody will know that you've taken their pictures.

    For portraits, 85, 105 or even 135mm will be good. Wide angles are generally not good for portraits (head-and-shoulders kind) but are suitable for environmental portraits.

    For travel, I use a 28mm and 85mm combination. Your mileage may vary.

    As I always say: zoom with your feet. A prime lens will force you to think about your composition more critically, IMO.

    If you want robust lenses in current production, I can only think of Nikkor Ai or Ais lenses (but these are non-AF) and some of their pro-level AF lenses.

    WRT trading, I don't think TCW takes in kit lenses. But you may put it there on consignment, I think. On second thought, you may want to keep the 28-90 for rainy days, literally.

    If you find that you can't afford a certain lens now, wait and save for it. It will be worth it.

    I'm saving for my 35/1.4 too. : )

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