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Thread: My first try at Architectural Photography!

  1. #1
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    Talking My first try at Architectural Photography!

    Hi folks,

    Here are the results from last night's shoot. My first try at architectural photography. Hopefully you guys will enjoy it!

    Check them out here!

  2. #2

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    nice nice..
    Was actually looking forward to outdoor building pics though...

    As for interior, the lighting actually illustrates the mood U wanna show...
    Your lighting suggests lazy, cosy mood... Need a fireplace..

  3. #3
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    Default I think it just alrite........

    Quote Originally Posted by NEoPHYte31
    Hi folks,

    Here are the results from last night's shoot. My first try at architectural photography. Hopefully you guys will enjoy it!

    Check them out here!
    Hi there is plenty of room for improvement. When shooting interiors, the thing you have look for an angle which will create a big impact when someone sees a interior of the house. All your angles are somewhere in between. It's all about the horizontal and vertical lines. Ask any interior designers see what they love to see in a photo.

    First you need a wider angle lens for a start. I think your lens is not wide enough. Somewhere in between again. Is this an interior designers house or shop?

    Photo No.1 : What are angle are you looking at? The table or the sofa set?
    Photo No.2 : The chair at the right bottom corner to distracting. Either you fill with a flash to see more details or tilt an angle until you can see more colours on the chair. Both chairs!
    Photo No.3 : Again not working for me. You cut the bathroom half way. So not you cannot see the whole bath room.
    Photo No.4 : Nothing much. Just some furniture. And you cut away the other chair on the right. Long sofa set slighly dark too.
    Photo No.5 : Well, this photo i am not sure what you are trying here. So nothing works here.
    Photo No.6 : Angle not wide enough. Angle too low as well. You are cropping too much.
    Photo No.7 : Again, the chair in front is a distraction. It just block the whole shot. The long sofa set a little on the dim side.
    Photo No.8 : Nothing works here too. Just to tables and a couple of chairs. Angle too narrow and too low. Would want to see more the top part of the tables.

    Overall, your exposure is ok but dark as you did not fill-in with some lights. Other than that, your composition is too rigid and tight. Interior shot is about simplicity and uncluttered furnitures. When you have too much going on, it looks very messy. Must be more observant on every part of the furniture. The way the furniture is presented is very important. The angular of the furniture plays an important role in your interior shots. Move the furniture if you have too. Whenever you look at some of the pictures the pros take, it looks so clean and it seems so comfortable to sit in.

    Sometimes if you think it does not fit into you frame, remove the furniture. You need not put every thing inside. Go look for more interior books and see how the pros do it. You need some studio lights too to have some fill on some of the furniture. Using existing lights is never enough.

    Thanks!

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pro Image
    Hi there is plenty of room for improvement. When shooting interiors, the thing you have look for an angle which will create a big impact when someone sees a interior of the house. All your angles are somewhere in between. It's all about the horizontal and vertical lines. Ask any interior designers see what they love to see in a photo.

    Hi Pro Image,

    That post above was certainly very informative! I really learned alot. With that in mind, I do have some things I'd like to point out. I'll just answer them in replies to your statements.


    First you need a wider angle lens for a start. I think your lens is not wide enough. I was using the widest lens I have, which is a 24-85mm Canon. With it mounted on a D30, it is equivalent to a 35mm lens.. which is simply not enough. I do plan on purchasing the Sigma 15-30mm this Christmas though.. Somewhere in between again. Is this an interior designers house or shop? This is a friend's house. I merely took the photos coz I was bored..

    Photo No.1 : What are angle are you looking at? The table or the sofa set?
    I was really trying to capture the whole living room, not focusing on 1 object. Is it better to focus on just one object or the room itself?

    No.2 : The chair at the right bottom corner to distracting. Either you fill with a flash to see more details or tilt an angle until you can see more colours on the chair. Both chairs!
    Unfortunately, I don't have access to lights. Also, since I was just a guest, I didn't really want to move my friend's furniture around. But good ideas!

    Photo No.3 : Again not working for me. You cut the bathroom half way. So not you cannot see the whole bath room.
    This one was my least favorite photo. I'm thinking of taking it out of the gallery. My lens simply wasn't wide enough to capture the whole bathroom.

    Photo No.4 : Nothing much. Just some furniture. And you cut away the other chair on the right. Long sofa set slighly dark too.
    Could you give me some advice on what I should have done, working with my limited equipment? I can see all the errors in my images. Thing is, I just don't know how to fix them.

    Photo No.5 : Well, this photo i am not sure what you are trying here. So nothing works here.
    Again, just another 'trying to capture the entire living room shot'. But I think I was concentrating a bit more on the sofa.

    Photo No.6 : Angle not wide enough. Angle too low as well. You are cropping too much.
    Here, I was trying to get a symmetric look. and again, the lens was the limiting factor in how wide I could go. I think all my shots were done with the lens at its widest angle, and the tripod and camera as far back as possible.

    Photo No.7 : Again, the chair in front is a distraction. It just block the whole shot. The long sofa set a little on the dim side.
    Now that I look at it, yes, the chair in the front is such a big distraction! I should have looked for a better angle..

    Photo No.8 : Nothing works here too. Just to tables and a couple of chairs. Angle too narrow and too low. Would want to see more the top part of the tables.
    I agree.

    Overall, your exposure is ok but dark as you did not fill-in with some lights. Other than that, your composition is too rigid and tight. Interior shot is about simplicity and uncluttered furnitures. When you have too much going on, it looks very messy. Must be more observant on every part of the furniture. The way the furniture is presented is very important. The angular of the furniture plays an important role in your interior shots. Move the furniture if you have too. Whenever you look at some of the pictures the pros take, it looks so clean and it seems so comfortable to sit in.

    I'm not really too sure as to how to compose my images. I just try to get a vantage point where most, hopefully all of the furniture feels 'linked together' and is facing the camera. Would to get some advice on composition.

    Sometimes if you think it does not fit into you frame, remove the furniture. You need not put every thing inside. Go look for more interior books and see how the pros do it. You need some studio lights too to have some fill on some of the furniture. Using existing lights is never enough.

    Thanks!
    I just wanted to tell you what a BIG HELP this was in improving my shots! Would love to hear more from you Pro Image, and I just might write you an e-mail later on today, to talk to you more about architectural photography Do you have a gallery I could check out? Thanks!

  5. #5

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    sorry, i think
    they are furniture shoots
    this is not architectural photography nor interior
    'cos it doesnt show 'space' at all

  6. #6

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    all look ok the slight underexposure provides the right mood.

    next task: use a wider lens. u may come up with something new

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