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Thread: Bicycle Maintainence

  1. #21
    Moderator ortega's Avatar
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    Default Re: Bicycle Maintainence

    WD-40's main component is kerosene

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/WD-40

  2. #22
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    Default Re: Bicycle Maintainence

    Quote Originally Posted by Painting with light View Post
    WD-40 doesn't stay on the chain and it will drip creating a mess at home. Check out the finish line dry or wet lubes and really feel the difference shifting gears . When you have ridden the bike lets say a month. Get your wheel set tighten as your body weight will cause the new wheel set to adjust itself. That includes adjusting clearance of your disc brake pads. By doing all this , you will create less drag and a smoother ride. Dont be alarm by noises coming from the brake pads as they are new . Effective controlled braking only comes in when you run them for a month or so. OOps got carried away there, i use finish line and they really stick to your chain .

    Have a safe ride my friend.
    Thanks, i will go get them next week. Now i just have to degrease the paint. There's a layer of protective grease over the paint.


    GMAN

  3. #23
    Senior Member Canew's Avatar
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    Default Re: Bicycle Maintainence

    Quote Originally Posted by ortega View Post
    WD-40's main component is kerosene

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/WD-40
    Quote Originally Posted by terryansimon View Post
    apparently WD-40 disintegrates metal compounds by "eating" away at them. that's how they remove rust. I say apparently because everybody whom I know that does not advocate WD-40 says that.
    Quote Originally Posted by Ninja23XX View Post
    Maybe it's corrosive since it can remove rust? My dad asked me not to use WD-40 as well.


    GMAN
    Thanks for all the replies relating to WD-40 guys!

  4. #24
    Senior Member Canew's Avatar
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    Default Re: Bicycle Maintainence

    Quote Originally Posted by Clown View Post
    no, never use WD40 unless you wanna loosen seized or rusted parts.
    just get a tube of bike grease for the deraillers, BB and headset.
    and a bottle of chainlube for the chain.

    and if you're using disc brakes, never ever get grease or oil onto the rotor or brake pads. if you do, use alcohol to clean them.
    Sorry for the noob question, but what is a 'BB'?

    TIA for replies.

  5. #25

    Default Re: Bicycle Maintainence

    Ah the Bottom Bracket. its the major part which holds on to the crank and it has loose or sealed bearings . worked as a part time bike mechanic when i was young. Iam a greese monkey hahahaha
    Man greatest tool. The imaginative mind.

  6. #26

    Default Re: Bicycle Maintainence

    So I just ask for 'bike grease' at bikeshops will do? Roughly how much?

  7. #27
    Senior Member Canew's Avatar
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    Default Re: Bicycle Maintainence

    Quote Originally Posted by Painting with light View Post
    Ah the Bottom Bracket. its the major part which holds on to the crank and it has loose or sealed bearings . worked as a part time bike mechanic when i was young. Iam a greese monkey hahahaha
    Bro, thanks for the explaination.

  8. #28
    Moderator Clown's Avatar
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    Default Re: Bicycle Maintainence

    should be about 16 for a tube of finishline grease.

    if you wanna spend less, just get a can of castrol heavy duty grease.
    Last edited by Clown; 19th June 2009 at 05:00 PM.
    sigh.

  9. #29
    Senior Member Canew's Avatar
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    Default Re: Bicycle Maintainence

    Maybe this thread of mine will help: http://www.clubsnap.com/forums/showthread.php?t=226255

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    Default Re: Bicycle Maintainence

    Quote Originally Posted by Clown View Post
    should be about 16 for a tube of finishline grease.

    if you wanna spend less, just get a can of castrol heavy duty grease.
    Thanks for the price. I think, the tube one should be fine.

    GMAN

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    Default Re: Bicycle Maintainence

    Quote Originally Posted by Canew View Post
    Maybe this thread of mine will help: http://www.clubsnap.com/forums/showthread.php?t=226255
    Good info, thanks, i do agree, grease traps dirt. After 1 day sitting at home, the grease on the shocks are starting to trap dust. Haha.

    GMAN

  12. #32
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    Default Re: Bicycle Maintainence

    I think you gotta de-grease it b4 you lube it up with wet or dry teflon..

    Diesel can be a cheap alterntive to a degreaser..but i use a chain cleaner with degreaser to 'de-grease'.. then use a rag and remove all the gunk by back pedalling..

    then i lube it up by pouring some lube onto a plastic bag, and back pedalling the bike.. that should make sure that every bit of the chain gets the lube..

    that's what i've been doing since hitting the trails 3 months ago.. no problems so far..
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  13. #33
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    Default Re: Bicycle Maintainence

    i wouldn't suggest grease for the chain or any exposed parts. it's a great lubricant as it sticks, but that's just the problem. it sticks and everything else sticks to it. Sand, dirt, mud, crud, etc.

    in my cycling days, i used heavy duty grease in the bottom bracket (BB), but i guess nowadays you can get the stuff with teflon and other slippery stuff.

    i "broke" my chain every week to clean it. Break meaning i'd use a chain breaker and push out one of the pins to split the chain. Tip - mark the pin you pushed out and push out the same pin everytime. that way you'll only have one weak link.

    i used kerosene to clean the chain. the stuff removes all the oil and dirt. after which i'd wash the chain clean with soapy water. let it hang dry, or wipe with a clean cloth.

    while the chain dries, clean the rear cogs, deraileurs, front chain rings, etc. i used an old toothbrush and some kero. then wash with soapy water and dry with cloth.

    then the chain goes back on and oil (back then it was pedros, finish line or white lightning) every single link on your chain. oil every bearing in your deraileurs, oil your rear cog bearings. only one or two drops is required, don't go overboard as it'll just drip all over the place and you'd be wasting lubricant.

    if you can, dismantle your BB, clean and repack with grease. if you've got sealed headset bearings, then there's nothing you need to do to maintain them. just don't overtighten the bearings as this will cause 'flat spotting' and your bearings won't spin smoothly. shocks are pretty much the same as headsets. check, disassemble, clean and lubricate. (but to tell you honestly, i've had my rockshock Judy for years and have not disassembled them once, and they still work fine.)

    if you examine your frame closely, you'll see some small holes at the ends of each tube (usually on the chain stays and rear triangle) i read once that some people put tape over them to stop water from getting into the frame. Don't do this! these are vent holes for when they weld the tubes together and when the frame is assembled they allow the frame to breath. i sealed these holes once and water did get in, somehow, and when i dismantled by BB, it was rusted and a pool of water spilt out of the BB. i replaced my BB and unplugged the holes and resumed normal riding, rain, shine, etc. on my next maintenance, guess what... no water build up, no rusting.

    whoops... sorry for the long post.
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  14. #34
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    Default Re: Bicycle Maintainence

    Quote Originally Posted by patch17 View Post
    i wouldn't suggest grease for the chain or any exposed parts. it's a great lubricant as it sticks, but that's just the problem. it sticks and everything else sticks to it. Sand, dirt, mud, crud, etc.

    in my cycling days, i used heavy duty grease in the bottom bracket (BB), but i guess nowadays you can get the stuff with teflon and other slippery stuff.

    i "broke" my chain every week to clean it. Break meaning i'd use a chain breaker and push out one of the pins to split the chain. Tip - mark the pin you pushed out and push out the same pin everytime. that way you'll only have one weak link.

    i used kerosene to clean the chain. the stuff removes all the oil and dirt. after which i'd wash the chain clean with soapy water. let it hang dry, or wipe with a clean cloth.

    while the chain dries, clean the rear cogs, deraileurs, front chain rings, etc. i used an old toothbrush and some kero. then wash with soapy water and dry with cloth.

    then the chain goes back on and oil (back then it was pedros, finish line or white lightning) every single link on your chain. oil every bearing in your deraileurs, oil your rear cog bearings. only one or two drops is required, don't go overboard as it'll just drip all over the place and you'd be wasting lubricant.

    if you can, dismantle your BB, clean and repack with grease. if you've got sealed headset bearings, then there's nothing you need to do to maintain them. just don't overtighten the bearings as this will cause 'flat spotting' and your bearings won't spin smoothly. shocks are pretty much the same as headsets. check, disassemble, clean and lubricate. (but to tell you honestly, i've had my rockshock Judy for years and have not disassembled them once, and they still work fine.)

    if you examine your frame closely, you'll see some small holes at the ends of each tube (usually on the chain stays and rear triangle) i read once that some people put tape over them to stop water from getting into the frame. Don't do this! these are vent holes for when they weld the tubes together and when the frame is assembled they allow the frame to breath. i sealed these holes once and water did get in, somehow, and when i dismantled by BB, it was rusted and a pool of water spilt out of the BB. i replaced my BB and unplugged the holes and resumed normal riding, rain, shine, etc. on my next maintenance, guess what... no water build up, no rusting.

    whoops... sorry for the long post.
    Wow, thanks so much. But i don't have the equippment or skill to do those. I think the best i know from my experience is to lube the chain and gears. Haha.

    Well, i just hate went rust occurs at the brackets and the center shifter. I'd remember not to ride in the wet anymore. I use to ride in the wet, and come home, just clean the bike and leave it to dry. And all the rust came in. Haha. I think, i'll opt out grease and take teflon instead. Thanks for the help. Any advice for the disc brakes?


    GMAN

  15. #35
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    Default Re: Bicycle Maintainence

    are yours hydraulic discs or cable actuated discs?
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  16. #36
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    Default Re: Bicycle Maintainence

    Quote Originally Posted by Ninja23XX View Post
    Wow, thanks so much. But i don't have the equippment or skill to do those. I think the best i know from my experience is to lube the chain and gears. Haha.

    Well, i just hate went rust occurs at the brackets and the center shifter. I'd remember not to ride in the wet anymore. I use to ride in the wet, and come home, just clean the bike and leave it to dry. And all the rust came in. Haha. I think, i'll opt out grease and take teflon instead. Thanks for the help. Any advice for the disc brakes?


    GMAN
    hydraulic brakes, just make sure there's enough oil pressure. when topping up the oil in the lines, be sure to 'bleed' the lines. i.e. make sure all the air is pushed out from the line otherwise you'll have a spongey feeling when you apply the brakes.

    cable operated disc brakes, same as normal brakes. don't put any oil in the cable housing. better to purchase good quality cable housing with a teflon lining for smooth operation.

    make sure you check the brake pads, remove all dirt, sand or tiny stones that may lodge in the pads. these will reduce brake efficiency and surely scratch your discs.

    i like to set up my brakes such that a pull of about 5 - 6mm will activate the brakes. i've been in situations where i've squeezed the lever all the way to the handlebar and the bike's not slowing down. so i always make it a point to check the tension on the cables.

    as for riding in the wet, it's one of my favourite things. if you're bike is properly lubbed, you shouldn't have a problem with rust. obviously, parts like nuts, bolts etc, in which the chrome coating or paint has been worn away and exposed the metal, rust will occur. unless you change all your bolts and nuts to stainless steel, aluminium or Titanium, they will always have some rust, but don't let that bother you.
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  17. #37
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    Default Re: Bicycle Maintainence

    Quote Originally Posted by Ninja23XX View Post
    Wow, thanks so much. But i don't have the equippment or skill to do those. I think the best i know from my experience is to lube the chain and gears. Haha.


    GMAN
    get a basic set of tools.

    - a shifting spanner
    - a set of crescent wrenches, 4,5,8 and 10mm
    - a set of allen keys
    - flat and philips screwdrivers
    - long nose pliers and standard
    - vice grips (great for crimping cable ends)
    - set of sockets

    other good tools to have:

    - chain breaker
    - tyre levers
    - tyre patch kit
    - pump

    the above tools should allow you to carryout most of the maintenance work on your bike and keep it running for years to come.
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  18. #38
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    Default Re: Bicycle Maintainence

    Quote Originally Posted by terryansimon View Post
    are yours hydraulic discs or cable actuated discs?
    Cable operated.

    GMAN

  19. #39
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    Default Re: Bicycle Maintainence

    Quote Originally Posted by patch17 View Post
    get a basic set of tools.

    - a shifting spanner
    - a set of crescent wrenches, 4,5,8 and 10mm
    - a set of allen keys
    - flat and philips screwdrivers
    - long nose pliers and standard
    - vice grips (great for crimping cable ends)
    - set of sockets

    other good tools to have:

    - chain breaker
    - tyre levers
    - tyre patch kit
    - pump

    the above tools should allow you to carryout most of the maintenance work on your bike and keep it running for years to come.
    Wow, thanks so much! I will get them when i have saved enough. Right now i have enough to get lubes for my bike. Haha


    GMAN

  20. #40
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    Default Re: Bicycle Maintainence

    Quote Originally Posted by Ninja23XX View Post
    Cable operated.

    GMAN
    here's another tip, your dominant hand operates the rear brake. i.e. right handed, rear brake lever on the right, left handed, rear brake lever on the left.

    in an emergency, 9 times out of 10, your dominant hand will squeeze first and strongest, so better to apply rear brake first before front, otherwise sure endo into the ground.
    Today is a gift; that's why it's called the present.
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